Mila

Mila (pr. mee-lah or my-lah) is a Slavic given name, often used as a short form for names such as Ludmila (love of the people), Milena (gracious, dear), Milica (gracious, dear), Camilla/Camila, or Milagros (miracles). It comes from the Slavic element milu meaning “gracious, dear”.

Origin: Slavic

 

Variants:

  • Myla (English)
  • Milla (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Milena (Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Polish, Russian, Italian)
  • Miléna (Hungarian)
  • Milica (Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian)
  • Ludmila (Czech, Russian)
  • Camilla (English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman)
  • Camila (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Milagros (Spanish)

 

Male forms:

  • Milan (Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Dutch)
  • Milen (Bulgarian)
  • Milo (English, Ancient Germanic)
  • Miloš (Czech, Slovak, Serbian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian)
  • Mile (Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian)
  • Miloje (Serbian)

 

Belisarius

Belisarius is the name of a renowned and famous general of the Byzantine Empire under the rule of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I and was called the Last of the Romans because he was believed to embody the values of the Ancient Roman civilization. The meaning behind the name is unknown. Belisarius was born in Illyria, the western part of the Balkan peninsula, so his name might be Illyric in origin. Another theory I’ve seen posted is that it might be derived from Slavonic Beli-tzar meaning “white prince” although that origin seems to be seriously in doubt. It’s also possible that his name is related to Belisama, a Celtic goddess whose name is uncertain though the first part of the name, bel-, which means either “bright” or “strong” or “powerful” while the second part of the name, -isama-, means “most” or “greatest” so the name essentially means “brightest” or “most powerful”. The second part of the name might also be related to Proto-Celtic *samos (summer) so the name may also mean “summer bright” which may make sense she is the goddess of fire and light as well as possibly being a goddess of the Ribble river in Merseyside, England.

Belisarius is also the name of a genus of scorpion.

Nicknames: Bel

Origin: Slavic, Proto-Celtic

Variants:

  • Belisario (Spanish, Italian)
  • Bellisario (Italian)
  • Bellisarius (English)
  • Bélisaire (French)

 

Female forms:

  • Belisaria (English)
  • Bellisaria (English)

 

Herodias

Herodias is the feminine form of Herod, a Greek name meaning “song of the hero” from Greek elements heros (hero, warrior) and oide (song, ode).

Origin: Greek

Variants:

  • Erodiade (Italian)
  • Aradia (Italian)
  • Hérodiade (French)
  • Heroda (English)
  • Herodia
  • Erodias
  • Irodiada (Romanian)
  • Herodiana (Latin)

 

Male forms:

  • Herod (Ancient Greek)
  • Herodes (Ancient Greek)
  • Herodion (Ancient Greek)
  • Rodion (Russian)
  • Rodya (Russian diminutive of Rodion)
  • Herodianus (Latin)

 

Edward

Edward comes from Old English elements ead (wealth, fortune, rich) and weard (guard, guardian) meaning “rich guardian”, “rich guard” or “wealthy guard/guardian”. It’s also an surname derived from the given name.

Nicknames: Ed, Eddy/Eddie, Ted, Teddy, Ned, Lalo (Spanish diminutive of Eduardo), Ede (Hungarian diminutive), Edu (Portuguese diminutive), Dado (Portuguese), Duda (Portuguese)

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Eadweard (Old English)
  • Eduard (German, Russian, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Catalan, Dutch, Estonian, Romanian, Georgian, Armenian)
  • Edvard (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Slovene, Czech, Armenian)
  • Edorta (Basque)
  • Eetu (Finnish)
  • Édouard (French)
  • Ekewaka (Hawaiian)
  • Eduárd (Hungarian)
  • Edvárd (Hungarian)
  • Eadbhárd (Irish)
  • Edoardo (Italian)
  • Eduards (Latvian)
  • Duarte (Portuguese)
  • Eduardo (Portuguese, Spanish)
  • Eideard (Scottish)
  • Ned (English)

 

Female forms:

  • Edwarda (English)
  • Edwardine (English)
  • Edwardina (English)
  • Eduarda (Portuguese)

 

Annora

Annora is a medieval English spelling of Honora which is a variant spelling of Honoria, the feminine form of Honorius meaning “honor” from Latin honos.

Nicknames: Nora, Ann, Annie/Anny

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Honora (Irish, English)
  • Onóra (Irish)
  • Honoria (Roman)

 

Male forms:

  • Honoré (French)
  • Honorius (Roman)

 

Dietrich

Dietrich is a Germanic male name meaning “ruler of the people” or “people ruler” from Germanic elements theud (people) and ric (power, ruler). It’s also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Diederich (German)
  • Theodoric (Latinized form of Dietrich)
  • Theodoricus (Ancient Germanic Latinized)
  • Derek (English)
  • Diederik (Dutch)
  • Dederick (English)
  • Derick (English)
  • Derrick (English)
  • Deryck (English)
  • Theoderich (Ancient Germanic)
  • Thierry (French)
  • Dirk (Dutch, German, English)
  • Teutorigos (Ancient Celtic)
  • Tudor (Welsh)
  • Tudur (Welsh)

 

Rie

Rie (pr. ree-eh in Japanese; Forvo) is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used. Some possible meanings are: 理恵 “logic, reason + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 利恵 “profit, advantage, benefit + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 梨絵 “pear tree + picture, painting, drawing, sketch”; 理江 “logic, reason + inlet, bay, creek”; 理絵 “logic, reason +picture, painting, drawing, sketch”; 里枝 “village, hometown + bough, branch limb, twig”; 梨恵 “pear tree + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 里依 “village, hometown + reliant, depend on, consequently, therefore, due to”. There are likely other meanings depending on the kanji used.

Rie is also a Dutch female name (pr. rhee), used as a nickname for Hendrika, the feminine form of Hendrik, the Dutch and Estonian form of Henry which comes from a Germanic name meaning “home ruler”; and Marie, which comes from Maria, the Latin form of Hebrew name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr “love”. Rie has also been used as a male nickname for Henri, the French male form of Henry.

Spelled ríe, it’s the Spanish verb of ríer meaning “to laugh” which comes from Latin rīdēre (to laugh).

Origin: Japanese, Ancient Germanic, Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Latin

 

 

Sasha

Sasha is a unisex given name originally used as a nickname for given names Aleksandr and Aleksandra, the Russian and Ukrainian form of Greek Alexandros meaning “defending men” or “defender of men” composed from alexo (to defend, help) and aner (man).

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Sacha (French)
  • Sascha (German)

 

Sabrina

Sabrina is the Latin form of Old Welsh Habren or Hafren, the original name of the River Severen in the United Kingdom. The name might be derived from Proto-Celtic *samaros meaning “summer fallow, fallow land” from Proto-Celtic *samos (summer) and *aros (ploughing, ploughed land), or from *samos (summer) and *renwo- (quick, fast) or it could possibly mean “boundary” from an unknown source. Sabrina could also be an Arabic name derived from Arabicصبر (sabr) meaning “patient”. 

According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, the river received its name from the daughter of Locrinus, a king of the Britons, and his mistress Estrildis, a captured Germanic princess who was originally brought to Britain as a captive by the Huns. Locrinus fell in love with her but he was already bethrothed to Gwendolen, the daughter of Corineus and an ally of his father’s, and though he went through with the marriage and had a son by her, Locrinus kept Estrildis a secret by locking her in a cave underground and visiting her there. He had his daughter by her. When Corineus died, Locrinus left Gwendolen and took Estrildis as his queen. In response, Gwendolen assembled an army during which he was killed in battle, and Gwendolen had Estrildis and Sabrina/Habren drowned in the river which now bears her name.

Origin: Proto-Celtic, Arabic

Variants:

  • Sabryna (English)
  • Zabrina (English)
  • Habren (Welsh)
  • Hafren (Welsh)
  • Severn (English)
  • Sabre
  • Sabren
  • Averne

 

Thomas

Thomas is the Greek form of an Aramaic name, Ta’oma, meaning “twin”. It was a nickname given to one of the twelve Apostles who was skeptical of the resurrection of Jesus Christ. I’m not sure why he was given the byname Thomas though some claims I’ve seen are that it was meant to distinguish him from another man by the same name (which was Judas); he was also known as Didymus, which also means “twin” in Greek. Thomas is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Aramaic

Variants:

  • Tomas (Swedish, Norwegian, Lithuanian, Spanish)
  • Tomás (Spanish, Portuguese, Irish)
  • Tomé (Portuguese)
  • Te’oma (Aramaic)
  • Toma (Bulgarian, Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian)
  • Tomo (Croatian)
  • Tomàs (Catalan)
  • Tomáš (Czech, Slovak)
  • Toomas (Estonian)
  • Tuomas (Finnish)
  • Tuomo (Finnish)
  • Tamás (Hungarian)
  • Tómas (Icelandic)
  • Tommaso (Italian)
  • Toms (Latvian)
  • Tamati (Maori)
  • Tomasz (Polish)
  • Foma (Russian)
  • Tàmhas (Scottish)
  • Tavish (Scottish)
  • Tòmas (Scottish)
  • Tam (Scottish)
  • Tomaž (Slovene)
  • Tomos (Welsh)
  • Thoma (Old Slavic)

 

Female forms:

  • Thomasina (English)
  • Thomasin (English)
  • Thomasyn (English)
  • Thomasine (English)
  • Thomazin (English)
  • Thomazine (English)
  • Thomasia (English)
  • Tomasa (Spanish)
  • Tamsin (English)
  • Tamsen (English)
  • Tamsyn (English)
  • Tamzen (English)