Lana

Lana is an Arabic female name deriving from a root word meaning “soft, tender, gentle”. It’s also a short form of names like Svetlana, a Slavic female name meaning “light” from Slavic svet (light), or Alana, feminine form of Alan, a Celtic name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to meaning either “little rock” or “handsome” though it might also be related to Alaunus, a Gaulish god of healing and prophecy whose name could be related to Proto-Celtic *al(aun) meaning “nourishing” or *alo meaning “feed, raise, nurture” or possibly meaning “shining one”.

Lana is also a Hawaiian name meaning “calm as still waters” or “afloat”.

Origin: Arabic, Slavic, Celtic, Hawaiian

 

لانا (Arabic)

 

Hussein

Hussein is a variant spelling of Husayn, a diminutive of Hasan meaning “handsome, beautiful, comely, good, goodly”. It’s also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Arabic

Variants:

  • Husayn (Arabic)
  • Husain (Arabic)
  • Hussain (Arabic)
  • Hisein (Arabic)
  • Hasan (Arabic, Turkish, Persian, Urdu, Punjabi, Bengali, Indonesian)
  • Hossein (Persian)
  • Hüseyn (Azerbaijani)
  • Husein (Bosnian)
  • Khasan (Chechen, Ossetian, Circassian, Ingush, Tatar, Bashkir)
  • Hüseyin (Turkish)

 

حسين (Arabic)

 

 

Haroun

Haroun is the Arabic form of Aaron, possibly meaning “high mountain”, “bright” or “exalted”, though the etymology behind the name is uncertain. It seems more likely that it comes from an Egyptian origin whose meaning has long since been lost. However, according to Wiktionary, it’s likely related to an Ancient Egyptian aha rw meaning “warrior lion” although considering it’s the only source I’ve found that lists it so, I don’t know how accurate that is. In fact I’m almost positive it’s not an accurate etymology, but it would be so cool if it were. Haroun is also a surname deriving from the given name.

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian

Variants:

  • Harun (Arabic, Turkish, Bosnian)
  • Haroon (Urdu, Arabic)
  • Aaron (English, Hebrew)
  • Arron (English)
  • Aaren (English)
  • Aerin (English)
  • Aron (Polish, Croatian, Scandinavian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic)
  • Aarón (Spanish)
  • Áron (Hungarian)

 

Melanie

Melanie is the English form of Mélanie, the French form of Latin Melania derived from Ancient Greek melas meaning “black, dark”.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Mélanie (French)
  • Melany (English)
  • Mellony (English)
  • Mellanie (English)
  • Melánie (Czech)
  • Melaina (Greek)
  • Melánia (Hungarian, Slovak)
  • Melania (Italian, Spanish, Polish, Late Roman)
  • Melanija (Serbian, Macedonian, Slovene, Latvian, Lithuanian)
  • Melani (Croatian, Slovene, Modern Greek, English)

 

Trip

Trip comes from a word referring to a journey or a voyage, or it refers to someone who stumbles and falls. It comes from Old French tripper (strike with the feet, tread or skip lightly) which comes from a Germanic source; or it could be from Middle Dutch trippen meaning “to skip, hop, trot, stamp, trample”. Tri- is also a Latin root word meaning “three”, used in conjection with other words such as triple and trisect, so Trip could be used with that in mind, or it could also be used as  nickname for someone who is the third (III) generation of the same name.

Origin: Old French Middle Dutch, Latin

Variants:

  • Tripp (English)

 

Colista

Colista is a female name that could be a variant spelling of Calista, the feminine form of Callistus, the Latin form of Greek Kallisto meaning “most beautiful” from kalos (beautiful). It could also be a combination of Colette (the short form of Nicolette, feminine form of Greek Nicholas meaning “victory of the people”) and Calista.

Colista is also a Spanish word, apparently referring to the bottom or last of something or someone (like the bottom team of a soccer league). It also has some use as a surname although there wasn’t much I could find behind it’s meaning and origin.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Spanish

 

 

 

Latham

Latham comes from an English surname meaning “(place of or by) the barns” derived from Old Norse hlatha (barn). It was a habitational place name referring to someone who originally came from a town called Latham.

Origin: Old Norse

Variants:

  • Laytham (English)
  • Lathom (English)

 

Kato

Kato is an African male name meaning “second of twins” in Luganda, as well as also being a Japanese surname (also spelled Katō or Katou) meaning “increase wisteria” (加藤) though it could have other meanings if other kanji are used. It’s pronounced ka-toe in Japanese. Kato could also be a variant spelling of Cato, an Ancient Roman cognomen meaning “wise” in Latin. Cato is also a Dutch diminutive of Catharina, the Dutch and Swedish form of Katherine. Katherine comes from Greek name Aikaterine though the etymology behind the name is not certain. It could be derived from another Greek name, Hekaterine from hekateros meaning “each of the two” or from Hecate, the name of the Greek goddess of witchcraft, the underworld, and crossroads, from hekas possibly meaning “far off” though another theory states it comes from a Greek word meaning “will”. It might also be derived from Greek aikia “torture”. Katherine could also be from a Coptic name meaning “my consecration of your name”. The spelling of the name was later changed to be associated with Greek katharos “pure”.

Origin: East African (Luganda), Japanese, Latin, Greek, Coptic

Variants:

  • Kató (Icelandic, Hungarian)
  • Cato (Ancient Roman, Dutch, English)