Saga

Saga is the name of an Old Norse goddess of wisdom and seems to be another name for the goddess Frigg. The name seems to come from Old Norse sjá meaning “to see”, likely in reference to the fact that she is a seeress. Saga is also a word derived from Old Norse saga meaning “saga, story”, cognate with Old English sagu (story, tale, statement). A saga originally referred to stories in Old Norse about ancient Scandinavian and Germanic history, sometimes romanticized about battles and heroes that happened in the past.

In Latin, saga means “fortune-teller, sooth-sayer, female sage”. It also seems to have some Japanese roots, the name of an emperor of Japan in the 9th century. Wikipedia writes his name with the kanji 嵯峨 meaning “steep, rugged + high mountain”. Saga is also a Japanese surname as well as the name of a prefecture in Japan, whose capital city is also called Saga.

Origin: Old Norse, Latin, Japanese

 

 

 

 

Ravi

Ravi is an Indian male name meaning “sun” in Sanskrit as well as also being a synonym with Surya which also means “sun” in Sanskrit. In Hindu myth, Surya is the god of sun and Ravi is one of many names he is known by.

Origin: Sanskrit

Variants:

  • Rabi (Bengali)

 

Emmeline

Emmeline is an Old French form of Germanic name Amalia, derived from Germanic word amal meaning “work” in reference to the idea of industriousness and fertility.

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Emmaline (English)
  • Emmalyn (English)
  • Emmelyn (English)
  • Emelina (Spanish)
  • Amelina (Ancient Germanic)
  • Amalia (German, Spanish, Dutch, Italian, Romanian)
  • Amelia (English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German)
  • Émeline (French)

 

Felix

Felix comes from a Roman cognomen meaning “lucky, successful, auspicious” in Latin. According to K.M. Sheard’s Llewellyn’s Complete Book of Names, it seems to have originally been used in Pagan religious ceremonies for trees whose fruit were offered to the gods and that it’s original meaning in Latin was “fruit-bearing” and “fertile” from a root cognate with Greek phuo “to make grow” or “to produce” and connected to Latin fio “to become”, fecundus “fertile”, fetus “pregnant” and “offspring” and even femina “woman”. Felix is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Phelix (Biblical Greek)
  • Félix (French, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Feliks (Russian, Polish, Slovene)
  • Feliu (Catalan)
  • Felice (Italian)
  • Felicius (Late Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Felixa (English)
  • Félice (French)
  • Felice (English)
  • Felicia (Late Roman, English, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish)
  • Felícia (Hungarian, Portuguese)
  • Felicja (Polish)
  • Félicie (French)
  • Felicie (Ferman)
  • Felicity (English)
  • Felicitas (Late Roman, German)
  • Felicitás (Hungarian)
  • Felicidad (Spanish)
  • Felicyta (Polish)
  • Felicita (Italian)
  • Felizitas (German)
  • Félicité (French)

 

June

June is the sixth month of the year according to the Julian calendar. The name derives from the Roman goddess Juno, wife of Jupiter and goddess of marriage and women; Hera is her Greek counterpart. Her name is possibly related to Latin iuvenis meaning “youthful” from Proto-Indo-European *yeu- meaning “vital force”, related to her role as a goddess of childbirth.

June may also be related to Latin iuniores meaning “the younger ones”.

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Junie
  • Juno
  • Junia (Ancient Roman)

 

Male forms:

  • Junius (Ancient Roman)

 

Mythili

Mythili is an Indian female name likely meaning “princess of Mithila”, Mithila being the name of a kingdom in which she was found. Mithila seems to mean “soil”. It was an epithet of Sita, the name of a Hindu goddess in the Rigveda as well as also being the name of the wife of Rama (who was the avatar of the god Vishnu), who was also the avatar of the goddess Lakshmi (who was the goddess of wealth and wife of Vishnu). Sita was found abandoned as a baby in a furrow, which is why she is referred to as the daughter of the mother goddess Bhumi-Devi, and was adopted by King Janaka of Mithila. Siva and Rama’s story is told in the Ramayana, an ancient Indian epic poem about Rama and wife Siva, who is abducted by the demon king Ravana, and she represents the ideal virtues and qualities a woman should have.

Origin: Sanskrit

Variants:

  • Mythily
  • Maithili

 

Varun

Varun is an Indian male name, a variant of Varuna, the name of an ancient Hindu god, one of the oldest in Hindu myth, who was the supreme leader of the cosmos, god of the sky, rain, celestial ocean, a well as keeper of the law and the underworld, responsible for the moral laws of the universe. He could see what people would do with his thousand eyes, and give out the appropriate punishment to those who sinned. His name is possibly related to Sanskrit root vr meaning “to envelop, to surround” likely in reference to the fact that Varuna had domain over the world. It may be related to Proto-Indo-European root *wer or *wel meaning “to cover”. Varuna’s importance eventually diminished as Indra and other gods became more important, his dominion limited and restricted to celestial waters instead of the entire world, later becoming more of an underworld deity who kept the souls of those who drowned and could give out immortality.

Origin: Sanskrit, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Varuna (Hindu)
  • Baruna (Malay)

 

Female forms:

  • Varuni

 

Lana

Lana is an Arabic female name deriving from a root word meaning “soft, tender, gentle”. It’s also a short form of names like Svetlana, a Slavic female name meaning “light” from Slavic svet (light), or Alana, feminine form of Alan, a Celtic name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to meaning either “little rock” or “handsome” though it might also be related to Alaunus, a Gaulish god of healing and prophecy whose name could be related to Proto-Celtic *al(aun) meaning “nourishing” or *alo meaning “feed, raise, nurture” or possibly meaning “shining one”.

Lana is also a Hawaiian name meaning “calm as still waters” or “afloat”.

Origin: Arabic, Slavic, Celtic, Hawaiian

 

لانا (Arabic)

 

Hussein

Hussein is a variant spelling of Husayn, a diminutive of Hasan meaning “handsome, beautiful, comely, good, goodly”. It’s also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Arabic

Variants:

  • Husayn (Arabic)
  • Husain (Arabic)
  • Hussain (Arabic)
  • Hisein (Arabic)
  • Hasan (Arabic, Turkish, Persian, Urdu, Punjabi, Bengali, Indonesian)
  • Hossein (Persian)
  • Hüseyn (Azerbaijani)
  • Husein (Bosnian)
  • Khasan (Chechen, Ossetian, Circassian, Ingush, Tatar, Bashkir)
  • Hüseyin (Turkish)

 

حسين (Arabic)