Naia

Naia has several possible meanings: Naia is a Basque female name meaning "wave, sea foam"; It may also be derived from the Naiads, water nymphs who typically inhabit fountains, streams, or any fresh water. The name comes from Ancient Greek nā́ō meaning "to flow" or nâma "running water", both derived from Proto-Indo-European *(s)neh₂- (to swim, to float); Spelled Nai'a, it's a Hawaiian word … Continue reading Naia

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Nereus

Nereus is the name of the Greek god of the sea, the father of the Nereids, and was a shapeshifter who had the gift of prophecy. He was known as the Old Man of the Sea. Though the name seems to be derived from Greek neros meaning "water", it seems more likely that it comes from a … Continue reading Nereus

Calpurnia

Calpurnia is an Ancient Roman name, the feminine form of Calpurnius meaning "chalice, cup". It comes from Latin calpar, used to refer to a vessel for liquids such as wine, which derives from Ancient Greek kalpís (jug, urn). Calpurnia was the third wife of Julius Caesar who apparently had a premonition of her husband's death and features in Shakespeare's play Julius Caesar … Continue reading Calpurnia

Tyson

Tyson comes from an English surname, either a variant of Dyson, a matronymic surname meaning "son of Dye", Dye being a medieval form of Dionysia, the female form of Dionysius, the Greek god of vine, wine, pleasure, festivity, madness, and wild frenzy, who represented both the intoxicating madness of wine as well as its beneficient qualities. Although the etymology of his name isn’t quite … Continue reading Tyson

Agafya

Agafya is the Russian form of Agatha which comes from Greek agathos meaning "good". Origin: Ancient Greek Variants: Agata (Russian, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian) Águeda (Spanish, Portuguese) Agatha (English, Ancient Greek) Agathe (Ancient Greek, French, German, Norwegian, Danish) Agáta (Czech) Ágota (Hungarian) Ågot (Norwegian) Águeda (Spanish, Portuguese) Agda (Swedish)   Male forms: Agaton (Russian) Agafon (Russian) … Continue reading Agafya

Royce

Royce comes from an English surname which derives from a medieval female name Royse, a variant of Rose, the name of the flower which derives from Latin rosa meaning “rose” via Greek rhodon (rose) which may ultimately be derived from Persian *wrda- (rose), though it may also derive from Proto-Indo-European *wṛdho- meaning “sweetbriar”. Rose was also originally the Norman form of Germanic names beginning with hrod meaning … Continue reading Royce

Lita

Lita was originally used as a nickname for names ending in -lita such as Rosalita (Spanish diminutive of Rosa, the Latin form of Rose which derives from Latin rosa meaning “rose” via Greek rhodon (rose) which may ultimately be derived from Persian *wrda- (rose), though it may also derive from Proto-Indo-European *wṛdho- meaning “sweetbriar”. Rose was also originally the Norman form of Germanic names beginning with hrod meaning “fame”, originally … Continue reading Lita

Manuel

Manuel is the Portuguese and Spanish form of Emmanuel, a  Hebrew male name meaning "God is with us". It seems to have been brought over from the Byzantine empire, belonging to two Byzantine emperors. Manuel is also a surname originating from the given name. Nicknames: Manny, Manu (German, French, Spanish, Finnish), Manolo (Spanish) Origin: Hebrew Variants: Emmanuel … Continue reading Manuel

Bonnie

Bonnie comes from the Scottish word bonnie meaning "pretty, beautiful" which derives from Middle French bonne (good) from Latin bonus ultimately derived from the Proto-Indo-European *dew- (to show favor; revere). Origin: Proto-Indo-European   Variants: Bonny (English)  

Kenneth

Kenneth is the anglicized form of two Gaelic names: Coinneach which derives from Gaelic caoin meaning "handsome, fair, beautiful, kind"; and Cináed meaning "born of fire". Kenneth is also a surname derived from the given name. Nicknames: Ken, Kenny Origin: Gaelic Variants: Coinneach (Scottish) Cináed (Scottish, Irish) Kennith (English) Kennet (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) Cainneach (Irish) Cionaodh (Irish) Cinioch (Irish) Ciniod … Continue reading Kenneth