Battle/War, Etruscan, Etruscan mythology, Latin, Light, M names, Male, Mythology, Physical Attributes, Proto-Indo-European, Roman mythology, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes

Marcus

Marcus is a Latin praenomen (given name) of uncertain etymology though it’s likely that it derives from Mars, the Roman god of war and agriculture. The name itself is of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” or from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”. However, it’s also possible that Mars is related to a much older source, perhaps from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture), his name of unknown meaning. Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavorsa cognate of Oscan Mamers, which could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”. Mars could also be derived from the same Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel”. Marcus is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European, possibly Etruscan

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Variants:

  • Markus (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Markos (Greek, Ancient Greek)
  • Mark (English, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Marko (Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish, Basque)
  • Marco (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch)
  • Marcos (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Marc (French, Catalan, Welsh)
  • Margh (Cornish)
  • Marek (Czech, Slovak, Polish)
  • Markku (Finnish)
  • Maleko (Hawaiian)
  • Márk (Hungarian)
  • Marcas (Irish, Scottish)
  • Markuss (Latvian)
  • Mars (Roman mythology)
  • Marcellus (Ancient Roman, German, Dutch)
  • Marcello (Italian)
  • Marcelo (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Marcelinho (Portuguese diminutive of Marcelo)
  • Marcellus (Ancient Roman, German, Dutch)
  • Marcellinus (Ancient Roman, German, Dutch)
  • Marzell (German)
  • Marcel (French, Catalan, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, German)
  • Marcellin (French)
  • Marcell (Hungarian)
  • Marceli (Polish)
  • Martzel (Basque)

 

Female forms:

  • Marcella (Ancient Roman, Italian, German)
  • Marcela (Czech, Slovak, Polish, Romanian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Marcelle (French)
  • Marcellette (French diminutive of Marcelle)
  • Marsaili (Scottish)
  • Marcelina (Polish)
  • Marcellina (Ancient Roman)
  • Marceline (French)
  • Marcelline (French)
  • Marcelyn (English)

 

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