Blaer

Blaer is an Icelandic unisex name meaning “gentle breeze” or “gust of wind”. Although it was used as a masculine name in Iceland, it wasn’t until 2013 that it was officially accepted as a female name as well.

Origin: Old Norse

Variants:

  • Blær (Icelandic)

 

Bellicent

Bellicent could be an Old French form of Belissendis, a Germanic name made of elements bili (gentle, kind, fitting, suitable, proper) and swind (strong, brave, powerful) so essentially meaning “gentle power” or “gentle strength”. It could also possibly be related to Belenus, the name of a Celtic god of the sun, whose name possibly means “bright, brilliant”

In the Arthurian legends, Bellicent is the half-sister of King Arthur (though in some versions she goes by Morgause) and is the mother of Gareth and Gawain.

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Belisent
  • Belisant

 

Benika

Benika is a Japanese female name meaning “crimson flower” (紅花) or “crimson fragrance” (紅香), though other possible meanings include “crimson + beautiful, good, excellent” (紅佳), and “crimson summer” (紅夏). There could be other meanings as well. Beniko is another variant of the name with the -ko () ending meaning “child”, used only for females, while Beni could also be used on its own as a given name.

Origin: Japanese

Variants:

  • Beniko
  • Beni

 

Brandy

Brandy is the name of an alcoholic drink, the shortened for of brandywine which is derived from Dutch brandewijn meaning “distilled wine” or “burnt wine”. It could also be a short form, or a feminine form, of Brandon, an English surname derived from a place name meaning “hill covered with broom” from Old English brom (broom, gorse) and dun (hill), likely referring to someone who lived near a place covered with gorse or broom shrubs.

However, Brandon could also be derived from Old French brandon from Frankish *brand meaning “firebrand, torch, sword” which ultimately comes from Proto-Germanic *brandaz, a cognate of Old Norse brandr.

Origin: Dutch, Old English, Proto-Germanic

 

Variants:

  • Brandee (English)
  • Brandi (English)
  • Brandie (English)
  • Brande (English)
  • Branda (English)

 

Male forms:

  • Brandon
  • Branden

 

Benji

Benji is a nickname for Benjamin or its feminine form Benjamina, the English form of Hebrew Binyamin meaning “son of the south” or “son of the right hand” from Hebrew ben (son of) and yamin (right hand, south).

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Benjy (English)
  • Benjamin (English, French, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian)
  • Binyamin (Hebrew, Arabic)
  • Benjamín (Spanish, Czech, Slovak, Icelandic)
  • Benjámin (Hungarian)
  • Beniamino (Italian)
  • Benjaminas (Lithuanian)
  • Venijamin (Macedonian)
  • Benjamim (Portuguese)
  • Beniamin (Romanian, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek)
  • Veniamin (Russian)
  • Venyamin (Russian)
  • Bünyamin (Turkish)
  • Peni (Hawaiian)

 

Female forms:

  • Benjamine (French)
  • Benjamina (English)

 

Beck

Beck is an English surname derived from German surname Bach meaning “brook, stream”, a cognate of Old Norse bekkr (stream, brook). It could also be a short form of Becker, another Germanic surname meaning “baker”.

Beck could also be a short form of Beckett, another English surname that comes from the same source as Bach.

It also comes from Middle English beke by way of Old French bec meaning “beak”. It was used as a nickname for someone who had a prominent nose, or which resembled the beak of a bird.

Beck is also a word, used in the idiom “at someone’s beck and call”, referring to someone ready to obey someone’s orders or subject to their slightest whims.

Origin: German, Old Norse, Old French

 

 

Birch

Birch is the name of a tree from Old English berc and beorc meaning “birch” which comes from a Proto-Indo-European source meaning “to gleam, shine, white”. Birch is also a surname referring to someone who lived near some birch trees.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

 

Brandon

Brandon is from an English surname derived from a place name meaning “hill covered with broom” from Old English brom (broom, gorse) and dun (hill), likely referring to someone who lived near a place covered with gorse or broom shrubs.

However, Brandon could also be derived from Old French brandon from Frankish *brand meaning “firebrand, torch, sword” which ultimately comes from Proto-Germanic *brandaz, a cognate of Old Norse brandr.

It could also be a various form of Brendan, an Irish name derived from Welsh brenin meaning “prince” from Celtic brigantinos meaning “king, prince”, “lord” or “high one”.

Origin: Old English, Proto-Germanic, Old Norse, Celtic

Variants:

  • Branden (English)
  • Brendan (Irish, English)