Belisarius

Belisarius is the name of a renowned and famous general of the Byzantine Empire under the rule of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I and was called the Last of the Romans because he was believed to embody the values of the Ancient Roman civilization. The meaning behind the name is unknown. Belisarius was born in Illyria, the western part of the Balkan peninsula, so his name might be Illyric in origin. Another theory I’ve seen posted is that it might be derived from Slavonic Beli-tzar meaning “white prince” although that origin seems to be seriously in doubt. It’s also possible that his name is related to Belisama, a Celtic goddess whose name is uncertain though the first part of the name, bel-, which means either “bright” or “strong” or “powerful” while the second part of the name, -isama-, means “most” or “greatest” so the name essentially means “brightest” or “most powerful”. The second part of the name might also be related to Proto-Celtic *samos (summer) so the name may also mean “summer bright” which may make sense she is the goddess of fire and light as well as possibly being a goddess of the Ribble river in Merseyside, England.

Belisarius is also the name of a genus of scorpion.

Nicknames: Bel

Origin: Slavic, Proto-Celtic

Variants:

  • Belisario (Spanish, Italian)
  • Bellisario (Italian)
  • Bellisarius (English)
  • Bélisaire (French)

 

Female forms:

  • Belisaria (English)
  • Bellisaria (English)

 

Beowulf

Beowulf is the name of eponymous hero of the Old English epic poem Beowulf, set in Scandinavia. He fights against the monster Grendel and wins, and later becomes a king of the Geats (a North Germanic tribe living in what is now Southern Sweden), later dying from a fatal found fighting against a dragon. The name comes from Old English beo (bee) and wulf (wolf) meaning “bee wolf”.

Origin: Old English

 

Bernie

Bernie is a nickname for names like Bernard, a Germanic male name meaning “brave bear” or “hardy bear” from Germanic elements bern (bear) and hard (brave, hardy); Bernadette and Bernardine, both feminine forms of Bernard; and Bernice, a variant spelling of Berenice, which is the Latinized form of Macedonian Berenike from Greek Pherenike meaning “bringing victory” or “bringer of victory” from Greek elements pheros (to bring) and nike (victory).

Origin: Germanic, Greek

Variants:

  • Berny (English)
  • Bern (English, Germanic)

 

Blaer

Blaer is an Icelandic unisex name meaning “gentle breeze” or “gust of wind”. Although it was used as a masculine name in Iceland, it wasn’t until 2013 that it was officially accepted as a female name as well.

Origin: Old Norse

Variants:

  • Blær (Icelandic)

 

Bellicent

Bellicent could be an Old French form of Belissendis, a Germanic name made of elements bili (gentle, kind, fitting, suitable, proper) and swind (strong, brave, powerful) so essentially meaning “gentle power” or “gentle strength”. It could also possibly be related to Belenus, the name of a Celtic god of the sun, whose name possibly means “bright, brilliant”

In the Arthurian legends, Bellicent is the half-sister of King Arthur (though in some versions she goes by Morgause) and is the mother of Gareth and Gawain.

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Belisent
  • Belisant

 

Benika

Benika is a Japanese female name meaning “crimson flower” (紅花) or “crimson fragrance” (紅香), though other possible meanings include “crimson + beautiful, good, excellent” (紅佳), and “crimson summer” (紅夏). There could be other meanings as well. Beniko is another variant of the name with the -ko () ending meaning “child”, used only for females, while Beni could also be used on its own as a given name.

Origin: Japanese

Variants:

  • Beniko
  • Beni

 

Brandy

Brandy is the name of an alcoholic drink, the shortened for of brandywine which is derived from Dutch brandewijn meaning “distilled wine” or “burnt wine”. It could also be a short form, or a feminine form, of Brandon, an English surname derived from a place name meaning “hill covered with broom” from Old English brom (broom, gorse) and dun (hill), likely referring to someone who lived near a place covered with gorse or broom shrubs.

However, Brandon could also be derived from Old French brandon from Frankish *brand meaning “firebrand, torch, sword” which ultimately comes from Proto-Germanic *brandaz, a cognate of Old Norse brandr.

Origin: Dutch, Old English, Proto-Germanic

 

Variants:

  • Brandee (English)
  • Brandi (English)
  • Brandie (English)
  • Brande (English)
  • Branda (English)

 

Male forms:

  • Brandon
  • Branden

 

Benji

Benji is a nickname for Benjamin or its feminine form Benjamina, the English form of Hebrew Binyamin meaning “son of the south” or “son of the right hand” from Hebrew ben (son of) and yamin (right hand, south).

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Benjy (English)
  • Benjamin (English, French, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian)
  • Binyamin (Hebrew, Arabic)
  • Benjamín (Spanish, Czech, Slovak, Icelandic)
  • Benjámin (Hungarian)
  • Beniamino (Italian)
  • Benjaminas (Lithuanian)
  • Venijamin (Macedonian)
  • Benjamim (Portuguese)
  • Beniamin (Romanian, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek)
  • Veniamin (Russian)
  • Venyamin (Russian)
  • Bünyamin (Turkish)
  • Peni (Hawaiian)

 

Female forms:

  • Benjamine (French)
  • Benjamina (English)