Cerelia

Cerelia seems to be a variant of Cerealia which is the name of an ancient Roman festival held in honor of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture (and the Roman equivalent of Greek goddess Demeter). The names comes from Latin crescere (to grow, increase, expand) derived from Proto-Indo-European *ḱer- (to grow, increase). Another possible meaning behind the name is that it may be a … Continue reading Cerelia

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Carson

Carson comes from a Scottish and Irish surname of uncertain meaning though it's been linked to Curzon, a Norman-French surname meaning "short" from Latin curtus (short) from Proto-Indo-European root word *(s)ker- (to cut). Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Karson (English) Carsen (English) Karsen (English)  

Croceus

Croceus comes from Latin meaning "saffron" and "golden, yellow". The word derives from Ancient Greek krókos (crocus, saffron) which may be from a Semitic origin or it may ultimately comes from Sanskrit kunkumam. Croceus's feminine form, Crocea, was the name of Julius Caesar's sword, Crocea Mors meaning "yellow death". Origin: Semitic, Sanskrit Variants: Crocus (Latin, English)   Female forms: Crocea (Latin, … Continue reading Croceus

Carey

Carey is an English unisex name, derived from Irish surname Ó Ciardha meaning "descendant of Ciardha", the latter a given name derived from Irish ciar meaning "black" though it may also be derived from Welsh caer meaning "fort, castle", making it a variant form of Carew meaning "fort on the hill". Carey may also be derived from Irish car (love) which comes from Proto-Celtic *kareti (to … Continue reading Carey

Caleen

Caleen is a female given name though there wasn't much I could find on it. It could be a variant form of Calina, a variant spelling of Kalina, a Slavic female name meaning "guelder rose" or "viburnum tree" (the guelder rose is the common name for the viburnum), though it may also be a variant form of Callie, a short … Continue reading Caleen

Carlyle

Carlyle is a variant spelling of Carlisle, a surname derived from the name of a city in Cumbria, England. The place was originally called Luguvalium, originally a Roman settlement named by the Ancient Romans meaning "strength of Luguvalos", made up of Lugus, a Celtic god associated with the Roman god Mercury; the origin of his name is unknown though it's … Continue reading Carlyle

Clemency

Clemency is the feminine form of Clement meaning "merciful, gentle", deriving from Latin clemens (merciful, lenient, mild, gentle). Origin: Latin Variants: Clemence (English) Clémence (French) Clémentine (French) Clementine (English) Clementina (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Late Roman) Clementia (Late Roman) Klementina (Slovene, Croatian) Klementyna (Polish) Klimentina (Macedonian) Clementa (Romanian, Spanish, Dutch, English)   Male forms: Clement (English) Klement (Czech, Slovak) … Continue reading Clemency

Celia

Celia is the English form of Caelia, the feminine form of Caelius, an Ancient Roman family name meaning "heaven, sky" from Latin caelum from a Proto-Indo-European root word of uncertain meaning. It was used by Shakespeare for a character in his play As You Like It (1623). Celia could also be used as a short form of Cecelia, a variant spelling of Cecilia derived … Continue reading Celia

Carmelo

Carmelo is the masculine form of Carmela, the Spanish and Italian form of Carmel which comes from Hebrew karmel meaning "garden" and "vinyard". Origin: Hebrew Variants: Carmo (Portuguese) Carmine (Italian)   Male forms: Carmela (Spanish, Italian) Carmen (Spanish, Italian, Romanian, English) Carmel (English, Hebrew) Karmela (Croatian) Karmen (Croatian, Slovene, English) Carmella (English) Carme (Galician, Catalan) Carmelita (Spanish)  

Christianne

Christianne is the feminine form of Christian which comes from Latin Christianus meaning "a Christian", referring to someone who followed Christianity. Christian comes from Ancient Greek Christos meaning "anointed" or "the anointed one". Nicknames: Chris, Chrissie/Chrissy, Christie/Christy Origin: Ancient Greek Variants: Christian (English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) Christiana (English, Late Roman) Christina (English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Greek) Christine (French, … Continue reading Christianne