China

China is the name of a country in East China as well as the name of a fine porcelain. The origin behind the name isn't clear-cut. It may have originated from Persian čin چین (China) via Sanskrit Cīna (China) which may have originated from the name of the Qi 秦 (pr. chin) dynasty, the first imperial dynasty of China lasting from …

Cornelian

Cornelian is an alternate spelling of Carnelian, the name of a reddish-brown type of chalcedony used in jewelry. Cornelian comes from either Latin cornus meaning "cornel, dogwood" which may be related to Ancient Greek kerasós (cherry), derived from an uncertain origin, either Anatolian or pre-Greek; or from Latin cornu meaning "horn". The Carnelian spelling seems to have been influenced from Latin carneus …

Colt

Colt is an English word referring to a young male horse under four years, though it can also be used to refer to a young, inexperienced person. In Biblical translations, colt is used to refer to a young camel or donkey. The word comes from Old English colt (young donkey, young camel) via Proto-Germanic *kultaz derived from …

Carly

Carly is a female given name, the feminine form of Carl which comes from Proto-Germanic *karilaz meaning "free man" derived from a PIE root word. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, connoting the idea of someone who was free. …

Columbus

Columbus is the anglicized form of Italian Colombo which comes from Latin columbus meaning "dove; pigeon" from Ancient Greek kolumbos (diver) which seems to derive from a pre-Greek origin. Origin: pre-Greek Variants: Colombo (Italian) Columba (Late Roman) Columbanus (Late Roman) Columban (Irish) Coleman (English, Irish) Colmán (Irish) Kolman (German) Koloman (German, Slovak) Colombano (Italian) Calum (Scottish) Callum (Scottish)   Female …

Castor

Castor is the name of one of the Dioscuri (meaning "the boys of Zeus"), the twin brother of Pollux in Greek mythology.Their mother was Leda, the queen of Sparta and the wife of Tyndareus, but Castor and Pollux had different fathers- Castor was the son of Tyndareus while Pollux was the son of Zeus. Castor was skillful in managing and taming wild horse while Pollux was …

Cadmium

Cadmium is the name of a chemical element (symbol Cd) with an atomic number of 48. It's a soft silvery-white bluish color and can be coated to metals to prevent corrosion, and  is also used to make rechargeable batteries and in the control rods of nuclear reactors. Cadmium can also be used as a colored pigment …

Clarity

Clarity is an English word referring to a state or quality of clearness or lucidity, either in appearance, thought, or style. It comes from Old French clarté (clarity; clearness) via Latin clāritās (clarity; brightness) from clarus (clear, bright; famous) derived from PIE root word *kelh₁- (to shout, call). Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Klarity (English)  

Callahan

Callahan comes from an Irish surname, an anglicized form of Irish Ó Ceallacháin meaning "descendant of Ceallachán", Ceallachán being a diminutive form of Ceallach, a name of uncertain meaning though it could mean "bright-headed" or it could be derived from ceallach (war, strife) or ceall (church). Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Kallahan (English) Ceallachán (Irish)  

Cullen

Cullen comes from a surname with a few possible sources: from an Irish surname, an anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Coileáin meaning "descendant of Coileán", Coileán meaning "pup, whelp, young dog"; it could also be an anglicized form of Ó Cuilinn meaning "descendant of Cuileann", Cuileann being an Irish and Scottish Gaelic word meaning "holly"; as an English surname it …

Chantal

Chantal comes from a French surname meaning "stone, stony" which comes from Old Occitan cantal (stone); although its popularly become associated with Old French chant (song), there's no etymological link between the two. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Chantel (English) Chantelle (English) Shantel (English) Shantelle (English)  

Culhwch

Culhwch (pr. keel-hookh; Forvo) is a Welsh male name meaning "narrow pig", made up of Welsh elements cul (narrow) and hwch (sow), though I've also seen it listed as meaning "hiding place of the pig". In Welsh mythology, Culhwch's mother Goleuddydd becomes mad when she gets pregnant and wanders the countryside; when her time came to give birth she regained her …