Draven

Draven seems to come from an English surname; it was popularized by the 1994 movie The Crow based on the comic book series, though the last name was given to the character in the movie. Although the popular consensus seems to be that the name is somehow derived from d’raven meaning “of the raven”, there’s no real accuracy to that statement, along with other meanings I’ve seen attached to the name such as “child of beautiful shadows” and “avenger”, although the accuracy for the last two seem far more murkier. Another possible meaning I’ve seen is that it comes from an Old English word drǽfend meaning “hunter”, but once again I can’t attest to the accuracy of that either.

Origin: English

Variants:

  • Dravin (English)

 

Della

Della originally started out as a nickname for names like Adela, from Germanic element adal meaning “noble”, and Adelaide, the French form of Germanic Adalheidis meaning “noble character” or “noble type” from Germanic elements adal (noble) and heid (kind, sort, type). Della is also an Italian word and surname meaning “of the”, originally used to refer to the place a person originally came from or the name of their father. It comes from Latin di + la.

Origin: Germanic, Latin

Variants:

  • Dela

 

Dalya, Dalia

Dalya is a variant transcription of Dalia, a Hebrew female name meaning “branch”, though Dalia is also an Arabic female name meaning “grape vine”.

Dalia is the name of the Lithuanian goddess of fate meaning “fate, luck” in Lithuanian from dalis (part, portion, share), as well as being a variant spelling and Spanish form of Dahliathe name of a flower named after Anders Dahl; Dahl is a surname that means “valley” from Old Norse dalr.

Origin: Hebrew, Arabic, Lithuanian, Old Norse

Variants:

  • Daliyah (Hebrew)

 

داليا (Arabic)

דַּלְיָה (Hebrew)

 

Dayton

Dayton comes from an English surname, a locational surname made up from Old English elements  dic (ditch, dike) and tun (enclosure, settlement) meaning “settlement by the ditch” or “settlement surrounded by a dike”, originally referring to someone who lived near such a place.

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Deighton
  • Deaton
  • Dyton

 

Dalton

Dalton comes from an English surname derived from a place name meaning “valley town” or “valley enclosure” from Old English elements dael (dale, valley) ultimately deriving from Proto-Germanic *dalan (curve, arch); and tun (enclosure, settlement).

Origin: Proto-Germanic, Old English

 

David

David comes from a Hebrew male name meaning “beloved”. It’s also a surname derived from the given name.

Nicknames: Dave, Davey/Davie/Davi

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Dávid (Hungarian, Slovak)
  • Dovid (Yiddish)
  • Daud (Arabic, Indonesian)
  • Dawud (Arabic)
  • Dawood (Arabic)
  • Dawid (Polish, Biblical Hebrew)
  • Daveth (Cornish)
  • Taavet (Estonian)
  • Taavetti (Finnish)
  • Davit (Georgian)
  • Daviti (Georgian)
  • Dáibhí (Irish)
  • Dàibhidh (Scottish Gaelic)
  • Daividh (Scottish Gaelic)
  • Davi (Portuguese Brazilian)
  • Davide (Italian)
  • Dovydas (Lithuanian)
  • Davud (Persian)
  • Dafydd (Welsh)
  • Dewi (Welsh)
  • Dewydd (Old Welsh)
  • Davíd (Icelandic)

 

Female forms:

  • Davina (English)
  • Davena (English)
  • Davinia (English)
  • Davida (English)

Demeter

Demeter is the goddess of agriculture who presides over all growing things, particularly crops, the mother of Persephone, and the sister of Zeus. Though the etymology behind the name is uncertain, the second element of the name is from Greek meter meaning “mother”. The first part of the name is a little tricky. It could be linked to da meaning “earth” which is the Doric form of Greek ge (earth) essentially meaning “mother earth”. Another possible theory is that it comes from the same Proto-Indo-European root word as Zeus’s name, *Dyeus, likely meaning “shine” or “sky, heaven, god”.

Demeter is also the Hungarian male form of Demetrius which is actually the masculine form of Greek Demeter.

Origin: Greek, Proto-Indo-European

Female variants:

  • Demetria (Ancient Greek, English)
  • Demetra (Greek, Italian, Romanian)
  • Dimitra (Modern Greek)

 

Male forms:

  • Demetrius (Ancient Greek)
  • Demetrios (Ancient Greek)
  • Dimitrios (Modern Greek)
  • Dimitris (Modern Greek)

 

Dean

Dean is from an English surname, either derived from Middle English dene meaning “valley” or else it’s an occupational surname meaning “dean”, referring to a person who was a dean or someone who worked for one, referring to an ecclesialtical head of a cathedral. It’s derived from Latin decanus meaning “chief of ten” in reference to someone who was in charge of ten people. A dean is the head of a college or university.

Dean could also be a variant spelling of Deen or Dīn, an Arabic male name meaning “religion”.

Origin: Latin, Arabic

Variants:

  • Deen (Arabic)
  • Dene (English)

 

Douglas

Douglas is the Anglicized Scottish surname Dubhghlas meaning “dark river” or “dark stream” from Gaelic elements dubh (dark) and glais which means “river, stream” though it also means “green” . It comes from the name of a river in Scotland from which the clan Douglas derives its name.

Nicknames include Doug.

Variants:

  • Dubhghlas (Scottish)
  • Douglass (Scottish)