Dusana

Dusana (pr. du-sa-na) could be a variant form of Dušana (pr. du-sha-na) , without the š symbol. It's the feminine form of Dušan which comes from Slavic dusha meaning "soul, spirit". Origin: Slavic   Variants: Dušana (Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovak) Dušanka (Serbian, Slovene, Croatian) Dušica (Serbian) Dushana (English)   Male forms: Dušan (Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovak, Slovene, Macedonian) Duško (Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian) Dushan … Continue reading Dusana

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Danuta

Danuta is a female given name, the Polish form of Danutė, a Lithuanian female name of uncertain origin though it could possibly be a feminine form of Daniel, a Hebrew male name meaning "God is my judge", or possibly as a diminutive of Dana, which may have originated as a variant of Dane, referring to someone who came from Denmark … Continue reading Danuta

December

December is the twelfth month of the year which derives from Latin decem meaning "ten" derived from a Proto-Indo-European root. In the Roman calender, December was originally the tenth month of the year which originally consisted of ten months before the addition of two more months. Nicknames: Ember, Dez, Dezzy/Desi, Dee Origin: Proto-Indo-European    

Drake

Drake comes from an English surname meaning "dragon, snake"  from Old English Draca, which comes from Latin draco (dragon) derived from Proto-Indo-European drakon (dragon, serpent) from *derḱ- (to see). Drake is also a Middle English word meaning "male duck" from Proto-Germanic *anudrekô, made up of *anudz via Proto-Indo-European *h₂énh₂ts (duck) and Proto-Germanic *rekô (king, chief) via Proto-Indo-European *h₃reǵ- (king, chief). Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Drayke (English) Draki (Old Norse) Draco (Latinized Ancient … Continue reading Drake

Devere

Devere comes from a French surname meaning "of Ver" or "from Ver", referring to someone who came from a town called Vere. It's made up from French de (of, from) and  Vere meaning "alder" which comes from a Gaulish word so the name essentially means "from the alders". Origin: French, Gaulish  

Dwayne

Dwayne is a variant spelling of Duane, itself the anglicized form of Gaelic surname Ó Dubhán meaning "descendant of Dubhán", the latter derived from Irish dubh meaning "dark, black" with the diminutive suffix -an, so the name means "little dark one". Origin: Gaelic Variants: Duane (English, Irish) Dewayne (English) Dewain (English) Dwain (English) Devin (English, Irish) Devyn (English)   Female forms: Duana (English) … Continue reading Dwayne

Dixie

Dixie was once used as a generic name for the southern U.S. states from the Mason-Dixon line which defined the border between Pennsylvania and Maryland, and which later defined the boundary between free states and slave states. The name may have originated as a nickname for Dixon, an English patrynomic surname meaning "son of Dick", the … Continue reading Dixie

Duncan

Duncan is the anglicized form of Gaelic Donnchadh which means "brown battle" from Gaelic donn which comes from Proto-Celtic *dusnos (brown) via Proto-Indo-European *dunnos- (dark), and cath (battle) also derived from a Proto-Indo-European root word. Another possible meaning I've seen for the name is "brown chieftain". Duncan is also a surname derived from the given name. In Shakespeare's Macbeth (1606), Duncan is the king of … Continue reading Duncan

Dmitri

Dmitri is the Russian form of Demetrios, a Greek male name meaning "belonging to Demeter", Demeter being the name of the Greek goddess of agriculture. Though the etymology behind the name is uncertain, the second element of the name is from Greek meter meaning “mother”. The first part of the name is a little tricky. It could be … Continue reading Dmitri