Dinah

Dinah (pr. die-nah) is a Hebrew female name meaning “judged” or “vindicated” in Hebrew. It was the name of Jacob and Leah’s daughter in the Old Testament.

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Dina (Hebrew, English)

 

Duilio

Duilio is the Spanish and Italian form of Duilius, a Roman name possibly derived from Latin duellum meaning “war” derived from Proto-Indo-European *dew- “to injure, destroy, burn”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Duilius (Ancient Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Duilia (Ancient Roman)
  • Duília (Brazilian)

 

Dennis

Dennis is the English form of Dionysius, the name of the Greek god of the vine, wine, pleasure, festivity, madness, and wild frenzy, who represented both the intoxicating madness of wine as well as its beneficient qualities. He was the son of Zeus and the Theban princess Semele, making him the only god with a mortal parent and the last god to enter the Greek pantheon.

Although the etymology of his name isn’t quite clear-cut, the first part of the name, Dio-, means “of Zeus” though it could also be related to Proto-Indo-European *dyews meaning “sky, heaven, god” and “shining”. The second part -nysus might be derived from Nysa, the name of a mountain in which Dionysios was raised by the nymphs who loved there; the name might be related to an archaic Greek word meaning “tree”.

Dennis is also a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Denis (French, Russian, English, German, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Romanian, Croatian)
  • Denys (Ukrainian, English)
  • Denny (English)
  • Dennie (English)
  • Dionýz (Slovak)
  • Dionisie (Romanian)
  • Dénes (Hungarian)
  • Tenney (medieval English diminutive of Denis)
  • Dinis (Portuguese)
  • Diniz (Portuguese)
  • Dionísio (Portuguese)
  • Dionisio (Spanish)
  • Deon (English)
  • Deion (English)
  • Dion (Ancient Greek, English short form of Dionysios)
  • Dionysos (Ancient Greek)
  • Dionysios (Ancient Greek)
  • Dionysius (Ancient Greek)

 

Female forms:

  • Denise (English, French, Dutch)
  • Denice (English)
  • Deniece (English)
  • Denisa (Czech, Slovak, Romanian)
  • Dionisia (Italian, Spanish)
  • Dionísia (Portuguese)
  • Dionysia (Late Roman)
  • Diot (Medieval English diminutive of Dionysia)
  • Dye (Medieval English diminutive of Dionysia)

 

Dana

Dana is an English unisex name though it has multiple origins and meanings. As an English given name it’s derived from a surname, a variant of Dane, referring to someone who came from Denmark or had Danish descent. It could also be a variant of D’Aunay, a Huguenot French name derived from several place names in France called Aunay, of unknown meaning.

It’s also the feminine form of Daniel, a Hebrew male name meaning “God is my judge”, or a feminine form of Dan “judge”, as well as meaning a nickname for names such as Bogdana, a Slavic female name meaning “given by God”; Yordana, the Bulgarian feminine form of Jordan meaning “descend” or “flow down” though the name could also have been influenced by Jordanes, an Old German name that probably derives from Old Norse jord meaning “earth”; and Gordana, the feminine form of Gordan, a Slavic name meaning dignified”.  Dana is also a Persian unisex name meaning “wise”, “knowing”, “learned”. Spelled dána, it’s an Irish word meaning “bold” and “presumptuous”, as well as also being a modern form of Danu, the name of an Irish mother goddess and also a Hindu primordial goddess of the sea. Though the etymology behind the name is unclear I’ve seen it listed as meaning “swift flowing” though it also means “river” from the Avestan word dānu meaning “river”; the Danube river comes from this etymology.

Origin: English, Hebrew, Slavic, Persian, Irish,

Variants:

  • Dayna (English)

 

Dietrich

Dietrich is a Germanic male name meaning “ruler of the people” or “people ruler” from Germanic elements theud (people) and ric (power, ruler). It’s also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Diederich (German)
  • Theodoric (Latinized form of Dietrich)
  • Theodoricus (Ancient Germanic Latinized)
  • Derek (English)
  • Diederik (Dutch)
  • Dederick (English)
  • Derick (English)
  • Derrick (English)
  • Deryck (English)
  • Theoderich (Ancient Germanic)
  • Thierry (French)
  • Dirk (Dutch, German, English)
  • Teutorigos (Ancient Celtic)
  • Tudor (Welsh)
  • Tudur (Welsh)

 

Dober

Dober comes from a Slavic word meaning “good”; it’s the name of a settlement (also spelled Dobër and Dobre) in northern Albania. Dober is also a surname of English origin (with various spellings of Dauber, Dawber, Daber, and Doberer), an occupational surname for someone who was a plasterer from Middle English daubere via Old French daubier (whitewash, plasterer).

Origin: Slavic, Old French

 

Dido

Dido (pr. die-do) is the name of the Carthaginian queen featured in Virgil’s Aeneid. She was the founder and very first queen of Carthage (located in modern day Tunisia), who killed herself by throwing herself onto a funeral pyre after the Roman hero Aeneas left her to find a new home for the Trojan people. Though Dido’s real name was Elissa, she was also known as Dido later on, a name which seems to have been given to her by the Libyans meaning “wanderer” since she and her people had been wandering, searching for a new home before arriving at North Africa where she founded Carthage. Other possibly meanings for the name I’ve seen are it could possibly be from Phoenician meaning “virgin”, or related to Akkadian didu used to refer to a woman’s robe (dida) meaning “loosened” or “torn”.

Origin: Libyan, Phoenician, Akkadian

Variants:

  • Didone (Italian)
  • Didon (French)

 

Draven

Draven seems to come from an English surname; it was popularized by the 1994 movie The Crow based on the comic book series, though the last name was given to the character in the movie. Although the popular consensus seems to be that the name is somehow derived from d’raven meaning “of the raven”, there’s no real accuracy to that statement, along with other meanings I’ve seen attached to the name such as “child of beautiful shadows” and “avenger”, although the accuracy for the last two seem far more murkier. Another possible meaning I’ve seen is that it comes from an Old English word drǽfend meaning “hunter”, but once again I can’t attest to the accuracy of that either.

Origin: English

Variants:

  • Dravin (English)

 

Della

Della originally started out as a nickname for names like Adela, from Germanic element adal meaning “noble”, and Adelaide, the French form of Germanic Adalheidis meaning “noble character” or “noble type” from Germanic elements adal (noble) and heid (kind, sort, type). Della is also an Italian word and surname meaning “of the”, originally used to refer to the place a person originally came from or the name of their father. It comes from Latin di + la.

Origin: Germanic, Latin

Variants:

  • Dela