Gita

Gita is an Indian female name meaning “song” from Sanskrit gītā (song). The Bhagavad Gita (the divine song) is a Hindu epic poem in which the god Krishna and the prince Arjuna have a philosophical dialogue about the righteousness of battle against friends and family (Arjuna is about to battle his own cousin). 

Origin: Sanskrit

Variants:

  • Geet (Hindi, Urdu)

 

Gale

Gale refers to a very strong wind derived from gaile meaning “wind” of uncertain origin though perhaps related to Old Norse gol (breeze) or Old Danish gal meaning “bad, furious” in reference to the wind, derived from Old Norse gala meaning “to shout, charm away” or from Old English galan meaning “to sing, enchant, call” which ultimately derives form Proto-Indo-European gʰel- (to call, chant, shout). Gale is also a surname derived from Old English gal meaning “jovial, merry”, originally a nickname for a cheerful person. Another possible source is it comes from Norman French gaoile meaning “jail”, an occupational name for a jailer or perhaps someone who lived near a jail.

It’s also a nickname for Abigale or a variant spelling of Gail, both of which come from Hebrew meaning “my father is joy”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Old English, Norman French, Hebrew

Variants:

  • Gail
  • Gayle

 

Gilberte

Gilberte (pr. zheel-bert in French; Forvo and Youtube) is the French female form of Gilbert, an English male name meaning “bright pledge” or “bright hostage” from Germanic elements gisil (pledge, host) and beraht (bright).

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Gilberta (Dutch, Italian)

 

Male forms:

  • Gilbert (Ancient Germanic, German, Dutch, French, English)
  • Giselbert (Ancient Germanic)
  • Gisilbert (Ancient Germanic)
  • Gilberto (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)

 

Garrett

Garret is a given name as well as a surname, a form of either Gerard meaning “brave spear” or “hardy spear” from Germanic elements ger (spear) and hard (brave, hardy); or Gerald, another Germanic name meaning “ruler of the spear” from ger (spear) and wald (ruler, power, leader).

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Garet (English)
  • Garret (English)
  • Garett (English)
  • Gerard (English, Dutch, Catalan, Polish)
  • Gerald (English, German)

 

Gerda

Gerda is the feminine form of Dutch and German given name Gerd, a short form of Gerhard, the Scandinavian form of Gerard meaning “brave spear, hardy spear” from Germanic elements ger (spear) and hard (brave, hardy). Gerda is also the name of a Norse goddess and jotunn (giant) in Norse mythology, the wife of Freyr. The name comes from Old Norse garðr meaning “protection, fenced-in, to enclose”.

Origin: Germanic, Old Norse

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Variants:

  • Gerdina (Dutch)
  • Gerðr (Old Norse)
  • Gerth (Old Norse)

 

Male forms:

  • Gerd (German, Dutch)
  • Gerhard (German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Ancient Germanic, Scandinavian)
  • Gerard (English, Dutch, Catalan, Polish)

 

Gareth

Gareth is the name of one of the Knights of the Round Table in the Arthurian legends, the son of Lot and Morgause, Arthur’s older half-sister, which makes him Arthur’s nephew. The name first appeared in Thomas Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur, based on the name Gahariet, an Old French form of the name. The etymology behind the name is uncertain though it has been linked to Welsh gwaredd meaning “gentleness”. It could also be connected to another name, Geraint, the Welsh form of Latin Gerontius meaning “old man” from Greek geron. Other possible meanings I’ve come across is that it might be from Welsh Gweir “grass”, “hay”, “collar”, “loop” or “bend” or Gweirydd “Gweir + lord”, or that it could be from Old Welsh gwrhyt “valor”.

Origin: Welsh, Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Gahariet (Medieval French)
  • Gaharet
  • Gahareth
  • Gariet

 

Gilda

Gilda comes from Germanic element gild meaning “sacrifice, value”, originally a nickname for Ermenegilda, the Italian feminine form of Ermenegildo, itself the Italian form of Spanish and Portuguese name Hermenegildo which comes from a Visigothic name meaning “complete sacrifice” or “whole sacrifice” from Germanic elements ermen (whole, universal) and gild (sacrifice, value).

Gilda could also be from Old English gyldan meaning “to gild, to cover with a thin layer of gold” which comes from Proto-Germanic *gulthjan and gulþą (gold).

Gilda could also be the feminine form of Gildas, the Latinized form of a Celtic name. Though the etymology isn’t certain, it might be derived from Celtic elements *kCElyo (companion) + *dCEwo (a God) meaning “companion of God” or “servant of God”.

Origin: Germanic, Celtic

Male forms:

  • Gild
  • Gildas (Brythonic)

 

Gillian

Gillian is the Medieval feminine form of Julian, which comes from the Roman family name Julius which is either possibly derived from Latin ioulos meaning “downy-bearded” or it could be related to the Roman god Jupiter, which is made up of Indo-European *Dyeu-pater, dyeus meaning “shine” or “sky” and pater meaning “father”.

Gillian is also a surname, the Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Gileáin meaning “son of Gileán”, the latter derived from personal name Gealán, a diminutive of geal meaning “bright, white”.

The name Gillian has two possible pronunciations, either with a hard like Gilbert, or like a j, like Julian.

Origin: Latin, Indo-European, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Jillian (English)

 

Ganesh

Ganesh is a variant form of Ganesha, an Indian male name meaning “lord of the hordes” composed from Sanskrit gana (horde, multitude) and isha (lord, ruler). In Hindu mythology, Ganesh is the name of the Hindu god of good fortune, wisdom, and of gates and beginnings. He is depicted as having the head of an elephant and the body of a man.

Origin: Sanskrit

Variants:

  • Ganesha (Sanskrit)
  • Gaṇeśa (Sanskrit)
  • Ganesa
  • Ganapati
  • Vinayaka
  • Binayak

 

Gabriel

Gabriel is a male name, from Hebrew Gavri’el meaning “God is my strong man” or “God is my strength”. It’s also a surname originating from the given name.

Nicknames: Gabe

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Gavril (Romanian, Macedonian, Bulgarian)
  • Gavrail (Bulgarian)
  • Gavri’el (Hebrew)
  • Gavriel (Hebrew)
  • Gavrel (Yiddish)
  • Jabril (Arabic)
  • Jibril (Arabic)
  • Dzhabrail (Chechen)
  • Gabrijel (Croatian, Slovene)
  • Gabriël (Dutch)
  • Gavriil (Greek, Russian)
  • Gábor (Hungarian)
  • Gábriel (Hungarian)
  • Gabriele (Italian)
  • Gabriels (Latvian)
  • Gabrielius (Lithuanian)
  • Gavrilo (Serbian)
  • Cebrail (Turkish)
  • Havryil (Ukrainian)
  • Kaapo (Finnish)
  • Kaapro (Finnish)

 

Female forms:

  • Gabrielle (French, English)
  • Gabriella (Italian, Hungarian, Swedish, English)
  • Gabriela (Portuguese, Polish, Romanian, Spanish, German, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Bulgarian)
  • Gabrijela (Croatian)
  • Gabriëlle (Dutch)
  • Gabriele (German)
  • Gabrielė (Lithuanian)
  • Gavrila (Romanian)
  • Gavriila (Russian)