Gamaliel is a Hebrew male name meaning “benefit of God” or “reward of God”. Origin: Hebrew Variants: Gamliel Gamiliel  


Gladys comes from an old Welsh name, Gwladus, of uncertain meaning though it could possibly be derived from gwlad meaning “country” which derives from a PIE source. It has also been used as the Welsh form of Claudia meaning “lame, crippled”. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Gwladys (Welsh) Gwladus (Welsh)  


Gardenia is the name of a genus of tropical flowers. It was named after Scottish naturalist Alexander Garden, his surname derived as an occupational name for a gardener which comes from Anglo-Norman gardin via Proto-Germanic *gardaz (enclosure; court, yard; garden) from a PIE root word. Origin: Proto-Indo-European  


Gottlieb is the German form of Goteleib which is an Ancient Germanic male name meaning “God’s love” or “beloved by God” or “beloved of God” composed from Old High German elements got (god) from PIE *ǵʰutós (invoked, poured) derived from root word *ǵʰew- (pour, liberate); and lieb (beloved, dear) derived from PIE root word *lewbʰ- (to love). Gottlieb also means “god +offspring, son”, the latter from Old High German leiba (offspring,…


Gable comes from an English surname of uncertain origin and meaning: It’s been linked to Old Norse gafl meaning “gable”, which referred to a triangular-shaped hill or it may even be a variant spelling of Gabel, a German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) occupational name for a maker or seller of forks, such as agricultural equipment like hayforks; it’s also…


Gus is often used as a short form of names such as:  August, derived from Augustus meaning “great”, “venerable”, “majestic”; Gustavo (Spanish, Portuguese, Italian) and Gustav (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German) both deriving from Slavic Gostislav meaning “guest glory” from Proto-Slavic *gȏstь (guest) and slava (glory); Angus, the anglicized form of Scottish Aonghus either meaning “one choice” or “one strength, vigor, force”; the first element of the name comes from…


Gallant refers to someone who is brave, chivalrous, noble, and courteous, and someone who was attentive to women. It was originally used to refer to someone who stylish, pompous, or dashing. It derives from a PIE root word. Gallant is also an English surname that originally derived as a nickname for someone who was cheerful or…


Gondlir is the anglicized form of Göndlir, one of the many epithets of the Norse god Odin. It means “wand-wielder” or “wand-bearer” derived from Old Norse gandr (magic staff). Origin: Old Norse Variants: Göndlir (Old Norse)  


Grigori is a variant transcription of Grigoriy, the Russian form of Gregory which means “watchful, vigilant, alert”. It comes from Ancient Greek grḗgoros (watchful, alert) derived from a PIE root. Grigori also refers to a group of watcher angels. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Gregory (English) Gregorios (Greek) Gregorius (Latinized Greek) Gregor (German, Scottish, Slovak, Slovene, English) Gregorio (Italian, Spanish) Grégoire (French)…


Galina is the Russian and Bulgarian feminine form of Galenus, the Latin form of Ancient Greek Galenos meaning “calm, tranquil”. In Greek mythology, Galene is a Nereid nymph who was the personification of calm seas. Nicknames: Galya (Russian), Gala (Russian), Gal (English), Gale (English), Lina (English) Origin: Ancient Greek Variants: Galena (Bulgarian, Macedonian) Galene (Ancient Greek) Halina (Polish) Halyna (Ukrainian)…


Gabino is the Spanish form of Italian Gavino which derives from Gabinus, a Late Latin name meaning “of Gabinus”, referring to someone who came from Gabii, an ancient city of Latium in central Italy. Gabino is also a Spanish surname derived from the given name. Variants: Gavino (Italian) Gabinus (Late Roman) Gabin (French)   Female forms: Gabina  


Gene derives as a short form of Eugene, the English form of Latin Eugenius which derives from Ancient Greek Eugenios meaning “well born” from eu (well) from PIE root *h₁es- (to be) and genos (born) which also derives from PIE *ǵénh₁os (race, lineage). A gene is also a word used to refer to a molecular unit of heredity among living organisms. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Eugene  


Genevieve is the English form of Geneviève, a French female name which derived from Genovefa, a medieval name of uncertain origin. The first part of the name has been linked to Germanic kuni (kin, family) from Proto-Germanic *kunją (kin, family, clan) derived from PIE *ǵenh₁- (to produce, to beget, to give birth), though it’s also possible that first part of the name derives…

Gordan, Gordon

Gordan originates from South Slavic  gord meaning “dignified” or”proud” from Proto-Slavic good. The name is pronounced gor-dahn. Spelled Gordon (pr. gor-den), it’s a Scottish surname derived from a place name meaning “spacious fort” from Welsh elements gor (spacious) and din (fort) though it may also come from Old English meaning “mud hill” or “dirty hill”. Another possible etymology of Gordon is from Gallo-Roman…


Gemini is the name of the third sign of the zodiac and a constellation which represents twins Castor and Pollux, who had the same mother, Leda, but different fathers: Pollux was the son of Zeus while Castor‘s father was the Spartan king Tyndareus. The name comes from Latin geminī meaning “twins” from geminus (twin; double, paired), possibly deriving from PIE *yem- (to pair, match). Origin: Proto-Indo-European Male forms: Geminus (Ancient Roman)…


Gladiolus is the name of a genus of flowers that have sword-shaped leaves and brightly colored flowers. The name comes from Latin gladiolus meaning “little sword, sword lily” which is a diminutive of gladius (sword) which derives from Gaulish *kladyos (sword) via Proto-Celtic *kladiwos  (sword) from a Proto-Indo-European root word meaning “to break, beat”. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Gladio (Italian, Latin) Gladius (Latin)  


Greer comes from a Scottish surname which derives from the given name Gregor meaning “watchful, vigilant, alert; to be awake” from Ancient Greek grígoros (quick, fast, swift). Origin: Ancient Greek Variants: Grier (Scottish, English) Gregor (Scottish, German, Slovak, Slovene)  


Grayson comes from an English surname meaning “son of the steward”, an occupational name referring to someone who was in charge of an estate. It derives from Middle English greyve (steward) with the -son suffix. It could also mean “son of Gray”, referring to either someone who is gray-haired, or from given name Gratus meaning “pleasing, acceptable, agreeable, welcome” from Latin…


Godfrey is the English form of Germanic name Godafrid meaning “peace of god” from Germanic elements god (god) from Old English which derives from Proto-Germanic *gudą (god, deity) from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰutós (to call, to invoke); and frid (peace) from Proto-Germanic *friþuz (peace, tranquility) which also derives from a PIE source. Godfrey is also a surname derived from the given name. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Godafrid (Ancient Germanic) Guðfriðr (Old…


Grace comes from Latin gratia meaning “favor, kindness” and usually referring to qualities of elegance, pleasantness, charm, kindness, courteousness, and attractiveness. It derives from grātus (pleasing, acceptable, agreeable) via PIE *gʷerH- (to favor, approve; praise). I’ve also seen it listed as having originally been associated with Germanic element gris meaning “gray” though it was later eclipsed with the Latin…