Gladio

Gladio is the Italian word for Gladius, the Latin word for “sword” and referring to a type of shortsword used by Ancient Roman soldiers. Gladius might possibly be derived from Gaulish *kladyos (sword) from a Proto-Indo-European root word meaning “to break, beat”. Although I don’t believe Gladio has ever been used as a boy’s name before, I think it would be a rather nice name to give. Fun fact: gladiolus is the name of a genus of flowers, the name being a dimininutive of gladius so essentially meaning “little sword”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Gladius (Latin)
  • Gladiolus

 

Gentiana

Gentiana is the name of a genus of flowering plants, as well as also being the strictly feminine form of Gentian, derived from the given name Gentius which seems to have gotten its name from an Illyrian king supposedly because he discovered the medicinal properties of the plant. Though the etymology is uncertain, it could be derived from Latin gens meaning “tribe, people, kin, family” from Proto-Indo-European *genh- meaning “to produce, to beget, to give birth”. Though Gentian is a male name in Albania with Gentiana being its feminine form, in the English-speaking world Gentian could be used as a unisex name.

Origin: Proto-Indo-Eurpean

Variants:

  • Gentian (Albanian, English)
  • Gentien (French)
  • Gentius (Illyrian, Latin)

 

Female forms:

  • Gentienne (French)
  • Gentian (English)

 

Gilroy

Gilroy comes from a surname, the anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Ruaidh meaning “son of the red-haired youth” or it could be derived from Mac Giolla Rí meaning “son of the king’s servant”.

Origin: Gaelic

 

 

Golda, Goldie

Golda is a Yiddish female name meaning “gold”. Goldie could be a nickname for Golda, though it’s also an English name, originally used as a nickname for someone who had blond hair or who was a goldsmith, making it a unisex name. Goldie was also used as a nickname for someone who had an unusual pigmentation of one eye. Both Golda and Goldie are also surnames.

Origin: Yiddish, English

Variants:

  • Goldy (English)
  • Golde (Yiddish)

 

Gregory

Gregory is the English form of Latinized Greek form Gregorius deriving from Greek Gregorios meaning “watchful, vigilant, alert” from Greek gregoros. Gregory is also a surname deriving from the given name.

Origin: Greek

Variants:

  • Gregorios (Greek)
  • Gregorius (Latinized Greek)
  • Gregor (German, Scottish, Slovak, Slovene, English)
  • Gregorio (Italian, Spanish)
  • Grégoire (French)
  • Grigor (Welsh, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Armenian)
  • Gligor (Macedonian)
  • Krikor (Armenian)
  • Grgur (Croatian)
  • Řehoř (Czech)
  • Gregers (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Reijo (Finnish)
  • Reko (Finnish)
  • Grigol (Georgian)
  • Gergely (Hungarian)
  • Gréagóir (Irish)
  • Grigorijs (Latvian)
  • Grzegorz (Polish)
  • Grigore (Romanian)
  • Grigori (Russian)
  • Grigoriy (Russian)
  • Grigory (Russian)
  • Griogair (Scottish)
  • Greig (Scottish)
  • Grega (Slovene)
  • Hryhoriy (Ukrainian)

 

Female forms:

  • Gregoria (Italian, Spanish, Late Greek)
  • Grigoria (Russian, Greek)
  • Grigoriya (Russian)

 

Gita

Gita is an Indian female name meaning “song” from Sanskrit gītā (song). The Bhagavad Gita (the divine song) is a Hindu epic poem in which the god Krishna and the prince Arjuna have a philosophical dialogue about the righteousness of battle against friends and family (Arjuna is about to battle his own cousin). 

Origin: Sanskrit

Variants:

  • Geet (Hindi, Urdu)

 

Gale

Gale refers to a very strong wind derived from gaile meaning “wind” of uncertain origin though perhaps related to Old Norse gol (breeze) or Old Danish gal meaning “bad, furious” in reference to the wind, derived from Old Norse gala meaning “to shout, charm away” or from Old English galan meaning “to sing, enchant, call” which ultimately derives form Proto-Indo-European gʰel- (to call, chant, shout). Gale is also a surname derived from Old English gal meaning “jovial, merry”, originally a nickname for a cheerful person. Another possible source is it comes from Norman French gaoile meaning “jail”, an occupational name for a jailer or perhaps someone who lived near a jail.

It’s also a nickname for Abigale or a variant spelling of Gail, both of which come from Hebrew meaning “my father is joy”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Old English, Norman French, Hebrew

Variants:

  • Gail
  • Gayle

 

Gilberte

Gilberte (pr. zheel-bert in French; Forvo and Youtube) is the French female form of Gilbert, an English male name meaning “bright pledge” or “bright hostage” from Germanic elements gisil (pledge, host) and beraht (bright).

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Gilberta (Dutch, Italian)

 

Male forms:

  • Gilbert (Ancient Germanic, German, Dutch, French, English)
  • Giselbert (Ancient Germanic)
  • Gisilbert (Ancient Germanic)
  • Gilberto (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)

 

Garrett

Garret is a given name as well as a surname, a form of either Gerard meaning “brave spear” or “hardy spear” from Germanic elements ger (spear) and hard (brave, hardy); or Gerald, another Germanic name meaning “ruler of the spear” from ger (spear) and wald (ruler, power, leader).

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Garet (English)
  • Garret (English)
  • Garett (English)
  • Gerard (English, Dutch, Catalan, Polish)
  • Gerald (English, German)

 

Gerda

Gerda is the feminine form of Dutch and German given name Gerd, a short form of Gerhard, the Scandinavian form of Gerard meaning “brave spear, hardy spear” from Germanic elements ger (spear) and hard (brave, hardy). Gerda is also the name of a Norse goddess and jotunn (giant) in Norse mythology, the wife of Freyr. The name comes from Old Norse garðr meaning “protection, fenced-in, to enclose”.

Origin: Germanic, Old Norse

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Variants:

  • Gerdina (Dutch)
  • Gerðr (Old Norse)
  • Gerth (Old Norse)

 

Male forms:

  • Gerd (German, Dutch)
  • Gerhard (German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Ancient Germanic, Scandinavian)
  • Gerard (English, Dutch, Catalan, Polish)