Hermes

Hermes is the name of the Greek god of commerce and trade, known as the trickster god and the protector of thieves, travelers, and athletes, as well as a messenger of the gods and the god of boundaries. He guided the souls of the dead to the underworld. The son of Zeus and Maia, one of the Pleiades, the day after his birth when he was just an infant, Hermes stole his half-brother Apollo’s cattle. When Apollo tracked him down, Hermes gave him a lyre he had just invented from the shell of a tortoise as an apology. He is the father of Autolycus, the Prince of Thieves, and the great-grandfather of the hero Odysseus. Although the etymology of the name has been linked to Greek herma meaning “cairn, pile of stones, boundary marker” it could also be related to Proto-European *ser “to bind, put together”; or it could be related to an older word of non-European origin.

Hermes is also a surname, either derived from the name of the Greek god or it could be a Germanic matronynic surname from the given name Ermens, a short form of either Ermelendis (derived from Germanic elements ermen “whole, universal” and linde “soft, tender”) or Ermgart (likely a short form of Ermengarde, also a Germanic name from Germanic ermen “whole, universal” and garde “enclosure”). As a French surname, it could have arisen as a topographic name for someone who lived in a deserted spot or a patch of barren land from Greek eremia “desert, desolate, lonely uninhabited” and the local suffix –ès.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Proto-European, Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Hermès (French)
  • Ermes (Italian)
  • Ermete (Italian)
  • Ermis (Modern Greek)

 

Female forms:

  • Hermione (Ancient Greek)
  • Hermia (English)

 

Hamilton

Hamilton comes from a surname derived from the name of a town that no longer exists in Leicestershire, England. It means “crooked hill” from Old English hamel (crooked, mutilated) and dun (hill).

Origin: Old English

 

 

Hadiyyah

Hadiyyah is an Arabic female name with two possible meanings. It means “gift” as well as also being a variant spelling of Hadia, the feminine form of Hadi meaning “leader, guide”.

Origin: Arabic

Variants:

  • Hadiyah
  • Hediiye (Turkish)
  • Hadia
  • Hadiya
  • Hadya
  • Hadiiye (Turkish)

 

Male forms:

  • Hadi

 

هدية (Arabic) “gift”

هادية (Arabic) “leader, guide”

 

Herodias

Herodias is the feminine form of Herod, a Greek name meaning “song of the hero” from Greek elements heros (hero, warrior) and oide (song, ode).

Origin: Greek

Variants:

  • Erodiade (Italian)
  • Aradia (Italian)
  • Hérodiade (French)
  • Heroda (English)
  • Herodia
  • Erodias
  • Irodiada (Romanian)
  • Herodiana (Latin)

 

Male forms:

  • Herod (Ancient Greek)
  • Herodes (Ancient Greek)
  • Herodion (Ancient Greek)
  • Rodion (Russian)
  • Rodya (Russian diminutive of Rodion)
  • Herodianus (Latin)

 

Harlan

Harlan comes from an English surname made up of Old English elements hara (hare), har (gray), hær (rock) and land (land) so the name essentially means “hare land”, “rock land” or “gray land”.

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Harland (English)

 

Hussein

Hussein is a variant spelling of Husayn, a diminutive of Hasan meaning “handsome, beautiful, comely, good, goodly”. It’s also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Arabic

Variants:

  • Husayn (Arabic)
  • Husain (Arabic)
  • Hussain (Arabic)
  • Hisein (Arabic)
  • Hasan (Arabic, Turkish, Persian, Urdu, Punjabi, Bengali, Indonesian)
  • Hossein (Persian)
  • Hüseyn (Azerbaijani)
  • Husein (Bosnian)
  • Khasan (Chechen, Ossetian, Circassian, Ingush, Tatar, Bashkir)
  • Hüseyin (Turkish)

 

حسين (Arabic)

 

 

Haroun

Haroun is the Arabic form of Aaron, possibly meaning “high mountain”, “bright” or “exalted”, though the etymology behind the name is uncertain. It seems more likely that it comes from an Egyptian origin whose meaning has long since been lost. However, according to Wiktionary, it’s likely related to an Ancient Egyptian aha rw meaning “warrior lion” although considering it’s the only source I’ve found that lists it so, I don’t know how accurate that is. In fact I’m almost positive it’s not an accurate etymology, but it would be so cool if it were. Haroun is also a surname deriving from the given name.

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian

Variants:

  • Harun (Arabic, Turkish, Bosnian)
  • Haroon (Urdu, Arabic)
  • Aaron (English, Hebrew)
  • Arron (English)
  • Aaren (English)
  • Aerin (English)
  • Aron (Polish, Croatian, Scandinavian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic)
  • Aarón (Spanish)
  • Áron (Hungarian)

 

Haydn

Haydn is a German surname meaning “pagan” or “heathen” from German Heide, which also means “heath, heathland”. It’s also been used as a variant spelling of Hayden, derived from Old English elements heg (hay) and denu (valley) or dun (hill) meaning “hay valley” or “hay hill”.

Origin: Old English, Germanic

Variants:

  • Hayden (English)

 

Hilda

Hilda comes from Germanic element hild meaning “battle” as well as being a nickname for any name beginning with Hilde such as Hildebrand or Hildred. Hilda is also a cogante of Old Norse Hildr, the name of a Valkyrie in Norse mythology who had the power to revive the dead.

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Hildy (English)
  • Hylda (English)
  • Hilde (German, Dutch, Norwegian)
  • Hildur (Icelandic, Norwegian)
  • Hild (Old English)
  • Hildr (Ancient Scandinavian, Norse mythology)
  • Ilda (Italian)
  • Elda (Italian)

 

Heinz

Heinz is a diminutive of Heinrich though it can be used as a given name on its own, the German form of Henry meaning “home ruler” from Germanic elements heim (home) and ric (ruler). Heinz is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Heinrich (German)
  • Henry (English)