Latham

Latham comes from an English surname meaning “(place of or by) the barns” derived from Old Norse hlatha (barn). It was a habitational place name referring to someone who originally came from a town called Latham.

Origin: Old Norse

Variants:

  • Laytham (English)
  • Lathom (English)

 

Leatrice

Leatrice seems to be a combination of two names, Leah (a Hebrew female name possibly meaning “weary, languid, tired” though it’s also been associated with the meaning of “cow”. It might also be related to an Akkadian word meaning “mistress”); and Beatrice, the Italian form of Beatrix which means ‘”happy” or “blessed” from Latin beatus, taking on the meaning of “she who makes happy” or it could be a variant form of Viatrix, also from Latin meaning “female traveler/voyager”. It’s just as likely that Leatrice is a variant spelling of Liatris, the name of a genus of flowers also known as blazing star and gayfeather, native to North America (including Mexico and the Bahamas). I couldn’t find anything behind the name.

Origin: Hebrew, Akkadian, Latin

 

Variants:

  • Liatris

 

Lisetta

Lisetta is an Italian diminutive of Elizabeth, which comes from Hebrew ‘Elisheva meaning “my God is an oath” or “my God is abundance”.

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Lysetta (English)
  • Lisette (French, English)
  • Lysette (English)
  • Lizette (English)

 

Levon

Levon is the Armenian form of Leon, a Greek male name meaning “lion”. It’s also a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Leon (English, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch, Ancient Greek)
  • Leontios (Ancient Greek)
  • Leontius (Latinized Ancient Greek)
  • Leo (Latin, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Croatian)

 

Lennox

Lennox comes from a surname via a place name in Scotland meaning “place of the elms” or “elm field” from Gaelic Leamhnachd made up of Gaelic elements leamhan (elm) and the locational suffix ach (field), likely referring to a place near elm trees. It was first anglicized as Leuenaichs and later as Levanaux and Levenex before finally becomming Lennox.

Origin: Gaelic

Variants:

  • Lenox (English)
  • Lenix (English)
  • Lennix (English)

 

Lukan

Lukan is a variant spelling of Lucan, derived from Roman Lucanus meaning “from Lucania”, referring to someone who came from the city of Lucania located in southern Italy. The name seems to be derived from Ancient Greek *leukos meaning “white” and “bright, shining”, or it could be derived from Latin lucus meaning “sacred wood” or “sacred grove” (lucus is also a cognate of lucere meaning “shining, bright” from the same root word as *leukos). Lucan is also a place name in Ireland, deriving its name from Gaelic Leamhcán meaning “place of the elms” from leamhán (elm) and ceann (headland, point).

As well as being a given name, Lukan is also a surname which seems to be derived from the given name. Lucan is also the name of a character in the Arthurian legend, a knight of the Round Table, as well as Butler of the royal court.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Latin, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Lucan (English, Ancient Roman)
  • Lucanus (Ancient Roman)
  • Loukanos (Ancient Greek)

 

Lenora

Lenora is a short form of Elenora, a variant form of Eleanor which comes from Old French form of Occitan name Aliénor which could mean “the other Aenor” from Latin alia meaning “another” and the given name Aenor, possibly a Germanic name of unknown meaning, though it’s been linked to Adenorde or Adenor, made up of Germanic elements adal (noble) and nord (north), or even as a contracted form of Azenor, a Breton name of uncertain meaning and etymology though it could also be derived from Breton enor “honor”. Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen Consort of France and England during the 12th century, is said to have been named after her mother Aenor, and Aliénor distinguished her as the other Aenor. However, since the name had been used well before Eleanor of Aquitaine’s birth, it seems likely that that particular meaning was only used for mother and daughter.

Another possible origin of Eleanor is that it originated from the name Helen, an Ancient Greek name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to Greek helene meaning “torch” or “corposant”, though it might also be linked to selene meaning “moon ”

Origin: Germanic, Latin, Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Elenora (English)
  • Eleanora (English)
  • Lenore (English)
  • Leanora (English)
  • Alienor (Occitan)
  • Aliénor (Occitan)
  • Alianor (French, English)
  • Alienora (Latin)

 

Lalia

Lalia is a short form of Eulalia, a Greek female name meaning “well-spoken” or “sweetly speaking” from Greek elements eu (good) and laleo (to talk).

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Eulalia (Ancient Greek, Spanish, Italian, English)
  • Eulalie (French)
  • Eulàlia (Catalan)
  • Eulália (Hungarian, Portuguese, Slovak)
  • Olalla (Spanish)
  • Eula (English)
  • Ulalia (English)

 

Male forms:

  • Eulalius (Ancient Greek)

 

Lydia

Lydia is a Greek female name derived from the name of an ancient kingdom in Asia Minor, used to refer to someone who came from there. It was apparently named after a king, Lydus or Ludos, whose name might mean “beautiful one” or “noble one”. Another possible meaning is that it means “play” or “sport” though that seems sketchy.

Lydos could also be tentatively linked to Proto-Indo-European h₁lewdʰ meaning “people”.

Origin: Greek, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Lidia (Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, English)
  • Lyydia (Finnish)
  • Lidiya (Russian, Bulgarian)
  • Lídia (Catalan, Portuguese, Hungarian)
  • Lidija (Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian)
  • Lýdie (Czech)
  • Lýdia (Slovak, Faroese)
  • Lydie (French)
  • Lyda (English)
  • Lidda (English)
  • Lydian (English)
  • Lydiana (English)
  • Lidiana (English)
  • Ludia (Ancient Greek)

 

Male forms:

  • Lydus (Ancient Greek)
  • Lydos (Ancient Greek)
  • Ludos (Ancient Greek)