Octavia

Octavia is the feminine form of Octavius, an Ancient Roman family name meaning “eighth” from Latin octavus.

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Ottavia (Italian)
  • Octávia (Portuguese)
  • Otávia (Brazilian Portuguese)
  • Octavie (French)

 

Male forms:

  • Octavio (Spanish)
  • Octavius (Ancient Roman)
  • Ottavio (Italian)
  • Octávio (Portuguese)
  • Otávio (Brazilian Portuguese)
  • Octave (French)

 

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Orin

Orin could be a variant of Orrin, itself an anglicized form of Odhrán, an Irish male name meaning “little pale green one”, or a variant spelling of Oren, a Hebrew male name meaning “pine tree”. It’s also a surname originating from the given name. Orin is also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used such as:

  • “cherry + small bell; buzzer” (桜鈴);
  • “at; in; on; as for + ethics; companion” (於倫)

In hiragana it’s written as おりん.

Origin: Irish, Hebrew, Japanese

Male forms:

  • Orrin (Irish)
  • Oren (Hebrew)
  • Odhrán (Irish)
  • Odran (Hebrew)
  • Oran (Irish)
  • Orren (English, Irish)

 

Orlando

Orlando is the Italian form of Roland, a Germanic male name meaning “famous land” or “fame land” composed from Germanic elements hrod (fame) and land (land), though it’s possible that the second part of the name may derived from nand meaning “brave, daring”. It’s the name of a city in Florida as well as a surname derived from the given name and the name of a character in Shakespeare’s As You Like It (1599/1600).

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Roland (English, French, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian)
  • Rolland (English)
  • Rowland (English)
  • Roeland (Dutch)
  • Rolando (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Roldão (Portuguese)
  • Rolan (Russian)
  • Roldán (Spanish)
  • Loránd (Hungarian)
  • Lóránt (Hungarian)
  • Hrodland (Ancient Germanic)

 

Female forms:

  • Orlanda (Italian)
  • Rolande (French)

 

Olin

Olin is a unisex name, a feminine form of Oline from Scandinavian male name Ole, the Danish and Norwegian masculine form of Olaf which comes from Old Norse Áleifr meaning “ancestor’s descendant” from Old Norse elements anu (ancestor) and leifr (descendant). Olin could also be the male form of Olina which also comes from the same source as Oline. Spelled Olenit’s the Russian word for “deer” as well as also possibly being a variat of Middle English holin, the word for holly.

As a surname, Olin could be from Germanic element odal meaning “heritage, fatherland”.

Origin: Old Norse, Russian, Middle English, Germanic

Female forms:

  • Oline (Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Finnish, Greenlandic)
  • Olina (Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Greenlandic, Finnish)

 

Male forms:

  • Ole (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Olaf (Danish, Norwegian, German, Dutch, Polish)
  • Olen

 

Ophelia

Ophelia was first coined in 1504 by Italian poet Jacobo Sannazaro for his poem Arcadia though it’s famously connected to William Shakespeare’s character in Hamlet although whether Shakespeare was inspired by Sannazaro or came up with it himself independently isn’t clear. The name was inspired from Greek ōphéleia (ὠφέλειᾰ) meaning “help, aid, succor” though it could also be related to Greek óphelos (ὄφελοςmeaning “profit, advantage, benefit” especially one made in war. The name may also have been based on the masculine name Ophellas, the name of a Macedonian soldier who served with Alexander the Great and was later the governor of the city of Cyrene acting under the rule of Ptolemy I, and it seems likely that the name is based on the Greek meanings though I couldn’t find anything online to confirm it.

Origin: Greek

Variants:

  • Ophélie (French)
  • Ofelia (Spanish, Italian)
  • Ofélia (Portuguese)
  • Ophela
  • Ephelia

 

Male forms:

  • Ophelio
  • Ofelio
  • Ophelas
  • Ophellas

 

Odafin

Odafin is a Yoruba name meaning “the establisher of laws” or “lawmaker”. From what I could find, Odafin is used to refer to the spiritual leader of his clan so it’s not used as a given name but rather a title. I first came across this name on the tv show Law and Order: SVU, as the name of the character Odafin “Fin” Tutuola. It also seems to be a surname, likely referring to someone who was related to an Odafin.

Nicknames: Fin

Origin: African (Yoruba)

Variants:

  • Odofin

 

Onika

Onika is an African female name though there doesn’t seem to be a lot of accurate information on it. I’ve seen it with various meanings of “warrior”, or it could be derived from Yoruba meaning “one in possession of”, or it could be a short form of Onyekachi, an Igbo name meaning “who is greater than God?” Onika is also a Maori word meaning “onyx”. Spelled Oni-ka (鬼化) it’s a Japanese word meaning “devil”.

Origin: African, Maori, Japanese

Variants:

  • Oneika
  • Onyeka (short form of Onyekachi)

 

Odin

Odin is an Anglicized form of Old Norse Óðinn which comes from óðr meaning “inspiration, rage, frenzy”. It comes from Proto-Germanic *Wodanaz meaning “poetic fury” derived from *wodaz (rage, manic inspiration, mad, furious, possessed). In Norse mythology, Odin is the chief god of the Norse pantheon, a complex character who presided over war, art, wisdom, death, and magic, as well as poetry and seers. He has one eye and a large beard, and likes to wander, often in a relenetless pursuit of knowledge. Odin also presided over Valhalla and the valkyries, and is supposed to be killed by the wolf Fenrir at the end of the world known as Ragnarok.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Variants:

  • Oden (Swedish)
  • Óðinn (Icelandic, Old Norse)
  • Woden (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Wodan (Germanic)
  • Wotan (Germanic)

 

Otis

Otis comes from a surname derived from Germanic given name Ode, the medieval English form of Otto meaning “wealth, fortune” from Ancient Germanic element aud (wealth, fortune).

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Otto (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, English, Ancient Germanic)
  • Odo (Ancient Germanic)
  • Ode (Medieval English)
  • Audo (Ancient Germanic)

 

Female forms:

  • Oda (Ancient Germanic)
  • Auda (Ancient Germanic)