Tamerlane

Tamerlane is the westernized form of Timur which comes from Proto-Turkic temür meaning “iron”. Timur was a Turkic-Mongol emperor who was known as Timur the Lame by Europeans, which became Tamerlane, because of wounds sustained by arrows that struck his right leg and hand which gave him crippling injuries.

Origin: Proto-Turkic

Variants:

  • Tamerlan
  • Timur (Tatar, Chechen, Kazakh, Uzbek, Russian, Turkish)
  • Timour
  • Temir (Kazakh)
  • Temur (Georgian)
  • Temuri (Georgian)
  • Temür (Old Turkic)
  • Demir (Turkish)
  • Timur (Turkish)

 

Tova

Tova is a Hebrew female name meaning “good”, though it’s also a Swedish variant of Tove, a modern form of Old Norse Tófa which is a short form of Old Norse Þórfríðr (or Thorfrither) meaning “Thor is beautiful” or “beautiful Thor” from Þórr/Thor (Thor) and fríðr (beautiful, beloved), Thor being the Norse god of thunder, strength, war and storms; his name fittingly means “thunder”.

Origin: Hebrew, Old Norse

Variants:

  • Tovah (Hebrew)
  • Tove (Swedish)
  • Tuva (Swedish, Norwegian)
  • Þórfríðr (Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Thorfrithr

 

Terry

Terry is an English unisex name originally used as a diminutive of Terence (which comes from Roman family name Terentius which is of uncertain meaning though it could be derived from Latin terens meaning “rubbing, wearing away” from Latin terere (to rub, to wear out) though it might also be related to Sabine terenus meaning “soft”) or Theresa ( comes from Greek Therasia, the name of an island (the name is of uncertain meaning but has been linked to several possible meanings such as Greek theros “summer”, therizo “to harvest, to reap”, ther “wild beast”, or therao “to hunt”).

As an surname, however, Terry comes from medieval given name Thierry, the Norman French form of Theodoric meaning “ruler of the people” from Germanic elements theud (people) and ric (power); it could also be an anglicized form of Gaelic surname Mac Toirdhealbhaigh meaning “son of Toirdhealbhach”, the latter being a personal given name meaning “one who is like Thor” or “one who is like thunder”; or it’s a French surname deirved from Occitan terrin meaning “earthenware vessel, earthenware vase”, an occupational surname for a potter, which comes from Latin terra (earth).

Origin: Latin, Greek, Germanic, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Terrie
  • Terri
  • Teri

 

Torcan

Torcan is a male name made up from Old Irish torcc “boar” with the diminutive suffix -an meaning “little boar” or “wild boar”. It also seems to be a Turkish male name possibly meaning “shy, bashful, coy, reserved”. Torcan is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Old Irish, Turkish

Variants:

  • Torcán (Irish)
  • Torccán (Irish)

 

Thistle

Thistle is the name of a genus of prickly plants which comes from Old English þistel from Proto-Germanic *þistilaz which seems to come from Proto-Indo-European *steig-,*steyg- meaning “to prick”. Thistle also refers to a color, a pale purplish color like the flower, as well as also being the national emblem of Scotland. It’s also a surname, likely used to refer to someone who lived near an abundance of thistles or used as a nickname for someone who had a prickly personality.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

 

 

Thomas

Thomas is the Greek form of an Aramaic name, Ta’oma, meaning “twin”. It was a nickname given to one of the twelve Apostles who was skeptical of the resurrection of Jesus Christ. I’m not sure why he was given the byname Thomas though some claims I’ve seen are that it was meant to distinguish him from another man by the same name (which was Judas); he was also known as Didymus, which also means “twin” in Greek. Thomas is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Aramaic

Variants:

  • Tomas (Swedish, Norwegian, Lithuanian, Spanish)
  • Tomás (Spanish, Portuguese, Irish)
  • Tomé (Portuguese)
  • Te’oma (Aramaic)
  • Toma (Bulgarian, Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian)
  • Tomo (Croatian)
  • Tomàs (Catalan)
  • Tomáš (Czech, Slovak)
  • Toomas (Estonian)
  • Tuomas (Finnish)
  • Tuomo (Finnish)
  • Tamás (Hungarian)
  • Tómas (Icelandic)
  • Tommaso (Italian)
  • Toms (Latvian)
  • Tamati (Maori)
  • Tomasz (Polish)
  • Foma (Russian)
  • Tàmhas (Scottish)
  • Tavish (Scottish)
  • Tòmas (Scottish)
  • Tam (Scottish)
  • Tomaž (Slovene)
  • Tomos (Welsh)
  • Thoma (Old Slavic)

 

Female forms:

  • Thomasina (English)
  • Thomasin (English)
  • Thomasyn (English)
  • Thomasine (English)
  • Thomazin (English)
  • Thomazine (English)
  • Thomasia (English)
  • Tomasa (Spanish)
  • Tamsin (English)
  • Tamsen (English)
  • Tamsyn (English)
  • Tamzen (English)

 

Tyrese

Tyrese is a masculine given name, a modern American name which could be a combination of Ty (a short form of names such as Tyler, Tyrone, and Tyson) and Reese, the Anglicized form of Welsh name Rhys meaning “ardor”, “enthusiasm”, “splendor, glory”. It could also be an elaborated form of Tyree, a variant form of McIntyre, a Gaelic surname meaning “son of the craftsman” or “son of the carpenter”.

Origin: Gaelic, Welsh, English

Variants:

  • Tyreese (English)

 

Tearsa

Tearsa is a very unusual and rare name I can’t find much information on. It could be derived from a surname (also spelled Tearse and Tearce) but I couldn’t find much background about it either. It’s possible that Tearsa is a variant spelling of Tirzah, from a Hebrew female name meaning “favorable” or “pleasantness” which makes more sense.

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Tirzah (Hebrew)
  • Tirtzah (Hebrew)
  • Thersa (Biblical Latin & Greek)
  • Thirza (Dutch)
  • Thyrza (Dutch)
  • Tersa (English)

Trip

Trip comes from a word referring to a journey or a voyage, or it refers to someone who stumbles and falls. It comes from Old French tripper (strike with the feet, tread or skip lightly) which comes from a Germanic source; or it could be from Middle Dutch trippen meaning “to skip, hop, trot, stamp, trample”. Tri- is also a Latin root word meaning “three”, used in conjection with other words such as triple and trisect, so Trip could be used with that in mind, or it could also be used as  nickname for someone who is the third (III) generation of the same name.

Origin: Old French Middle Dutch, Latin

Variants:

  • Tripp (English)