Valdis

Valdis is used as a short form of Latvian male name Voldemārs, the Latvian cognate of Germanic Waldemar which is derived from Slavic Vladimir meaning “famous ruler” or “great ruler” or “ruler of the world” from elements vladeti (to rule, to control) and meru (great, famous), though the second element of the name has also been associated with miru meaning “peace, world” so the name could also mean “peaceful ruler” or “world ruler”.

Valdis is also a variant form of Valdís, a female name composed from Old Norse valr “the dead (of battle)” or “the slain (in Valhalla)” and dís (goddess) so the name essentially means “goddess of the slain in battle”. It also seems to be a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Slavic, Old Norse

Variants:

  • Voldemārs (Latvian)
  • Waldemar (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish)
  • Vladimir (Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic)
  • Waldomar (Ancient Germanic)
  • Valdimárr (Old Norse)
  • Wealdmær (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Uladzimir (Belarusian)
  • Vladimír (Czech, Slovak)
  • Valdemar (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Vladimer (Georgian)
  • Valdemaras (Lithuanian)
  • Visvaldas (Lithuanian)
  • Vladimiras (Lithuanian)
  • Voldemaras (Lithuanian)
  • Valdas (Lithuanian short form of Valdemaras)
  • Włodzimierz (Polish)
  • Volodymyr (Ukrainian)
  • Wolodymyr (Ukrainian)
  • Vsevolod (Russian, Ukrainian, Medieval Slavic)
  • Vladilen (Russian contraction of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin)
  • Vladlen (Russian contraction of Vladimir Lenin)

 

Female forms

  • Vladimira (Slovene Croatian)
  • Vladimíra (Czech, Slovak)

 

Volterra

Volterra is the name of a town in Italy that goes back to the time of the Etruscans (who called it Velathri before the Roman conquered it and renamed it Volterrae, eventually becoming Volterra). The name is of Etruscan origin and the first part of the name, vel, might come from a root verb used to indicate height, such as a hill, and used in the names of families to indicate a high status. As a surname Volterra is used to describe someone who came from the town of Volterra.

Origin: Etruscan

Variants:

  • Velathri (Etruscan)

 

Varun

Varun is an Indian male name, a variant of Varuna, the name of an ancient Hindu god, one of the oldest in Hindu myth, who was the supreme leader of the cosmos, god of the sky, rain, celestial ocean, a well as keeper of the law and the underworld, responsible for the moral laws of the universe. He could see what people would do with his thousand eyes, and give out the appropriate punishment to those who sinned. His name is possibly related to Sanskrit root vr meaning “to envelop, to surround” likely in reference to the fact that Varuna had domain over the world. It may be related to Proto-Indo-European root *wer or *wel meaning “to cover”. Varuna’s importance eventually diminished as Indra and other gods became more important, his dominion limited and restricted to celestial waters instead of the entire world, later becoming more of an underworld deity who kept the souls of those who drowned and could give out immortality.

Origin: Sanskrit, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Varuna (Hindu)
  • Baruna (Malay)

 

Female forms:

  • Varuni

 

Vidya

Vidya is an Indian unisex name meaning “knowledge, science, learning”, “correct knowledge”, “clarity”, coming from the same root word as Veda from Sanskrit vetti (to know, to understand) from Proto-Indo-European root word *weyd (to see). It’s also one of the epithets of the Hindu goddess Sarasvati (also spelled Saraswati).

Origin: Sanskrit

Variants:

  • Widya (Indonesian)

 

Veda

Veda is an Indian female name meaning “knowledge, understanding”, “true knowledge”, “knowledge of ritual” or “sacred knowledge, sacred lore” deriving from Sanskrit vetti (to know, to understand) whic comes from the root word vid (to know) from Proto-Indo-European root word *weyd (to see).

The Vedas are the oldest sacred texts of Hinduism. There are four Vedas: Rigveda, Yajurveda, Samaveda, and the Atharvaveda.

Veda also seems to be a Turkish word meaning “farewell, goodbye, parting” from Arabic wada (goodbye, farewell), though I don’t know it it’s ever used as a given name in Turkey.

Origin: Sanskrit, Arabic

 

वेद (Sanskrit)- Veda

వేద (Telugu)- Veda

ವೇದ (Kannada)- Veda

 

Vadim

Vadim is a Russian male name of unknown meaning. It’s been used as the Russian form of Bademusthe name of a Persian Christian martyr who was killed in Persia and later recognized as a saint. I’ve seen the name as possibly originating from Persian badian meaning “anise, aniseed”. Vadim could also be a short form of Russian Vadimir composed of Slavic elements vaditi (accuse, blame, slander) and miru (peace, world).

Vadim is also a surname which seems to have originated from the given name.

Nicknames: Vadik is the Russiam diminutive of Vadim

Origin: Persian, Slavic

Variants:

  • Vadimir (Russian)

 

Вадим (Russian) Vadim

Victor

Victor is a Roman name which comes from Latin meaning “victor, conqueror”. It’s also a surname.

Nicknames: Vic

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Viktor (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian)
  • Vicktor (English, Swedish)
  • Victorius (Late Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Victoria (English, Spanish, Romanian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)

 

Viola

Viola comes from Latin viola meaning “violet” referring to the flowers. It’s also the name of a musical instrument related to the violin.

Viola is the name of the protaganist of Shakespeare’s play Twelfth Night (1601-02), the twin sister of Sebastian, who dresses up as a man and becomes entangled in a somewhat humorous love triangle that all works out in the end.

Viola is also an Italian surname from the same source.

The name is pronounced vye-o-lah or vee-o-lah.

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Violet (English)
  • Violette (French)
  • Violetta (Italian, Russian)
  • Violeta (Bulgarian, Romanian, Spanish, Macedonian, Serbian, Lithuanian)
  • Wioletta (Polish)
  • Wioleta (Polish)
  • Wiola (Polish)

 

Veronica

Origin: Greek

Meaning: Veronica is the Latin transliteration of Berenice, itself the Latinized form of Macedonian Berenike from Greek Pherenike meaning “bringing victory” or “bringer of victory” from Greek elements pheros (to bring) and nike (victory).

However, the name has also been associated with Latin vera iconica meaning “true image” in reference to Saint Veronica who apparently wiped Jesus’s face with the towel and whose image was imprinted upon it. It was known as the Veil of Veronica.

Nicknames: Vero, Vera, Ronnie/Ronny, Nica/Nika,

Variants:

  • Veronika (Russian, Czech, Slovak, German, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Lithuanian, Latvian)
  • Véronique (French)
  • Weronika (Polish, Sorbian)
  • Verônika (Portuguese)
  • Verónica (Spanish)
  • Bérénice (French)
  • Berenice (English, Italian, Ancient Greek)
  • Berenike (Ancient Macedonian)
  • Pherenike (Ancient Greek)
  • Bernice (English)
  • Berniece (English)
  • Bernike (Greek)

 

Vega

Origin: Arabic, Spanish

Meaning: the name of the brightest star in the contellation Lyra and the fifth brightest star in the night sky, Vega derives its name from Arabic- the phrase an-nasr al-wāqi means “the alighting eagle” or “the falling eagle”, and because Vega comes from the wāqi part the name would mean “alighting” or falling”.

Vega is also a Spanish surname meaning “meadow” or “plain”, a locational surname indicating where someone lived or used to live. De la Vega means “from the meadow” or “from the plain”.