Wallis

Wallis comes from an English surname, a variant spelling of Wallace which is a Scottish and English surname meaning “Welsh” or “foreigner” from Norman French word waleis (foreign), originally used to refer to someone who was a Welshman or who lived at the border between England and Wales. This spelling makes it more of a unisex name than Wallace does. Origin: … Continue reading Wallis

Advertisements

Wyatt

Wyatt comes from an English surname which comes from a medieval given name, Wyot, from Old English Wigheard made up from Old English elements wig (war, battle) via Proto-Germanic *wīgą (fight, battle) from Proto-Indo-European *weyk-; and heard (brave, hardy) essentially meaning "brave in battle". Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Wyat (English) Wyot (Medieval English)  

Willis

Willis comes from an English surname, a patrynomic surname meaning "son of William", the latter an English given name meaning "desiring protection" or "willful protection" from Germanic elements wil (will, desire) and helm (helmet, protection). Nicknames: Will Origin: Germanic Variants: Willys (English)  

Wendy

Wendy is often associated with J.M. Barrie's 1904 play (and later novel) Peter Pan and while he is credited with inventing the name, having coined it from a child's expression "fwendy-wendy", the name actually had some use prior to Barrie's play. It may have originally derived as a nickname for Gwendolen meaning "white ring" or "white brow" from Welsh … Continue reading Wendy

Wilfrid

Wilfrid is a variant spelling of Wilfred, an English male name meaning "desiring peace" or "desires peace" from Ancient Germanic elements wil (will, desire) and frið (peace). Nicknames: Wil/Will, Wilf Origin: Ancient Germanic Variants: Wilfred (English) Willifrid (Ancient Germanic) Wilfrith (Anglo-Saxon) Wilfrið (Anglo-Saxon) Guifré (Catalan) Vilfred (Danish) Wilfried (German) Vilfredo (Italian) Wilfredo (Spanish)  

Wayne

Wayne comes from an English surname, an occupational name for someone who was a cartwright, someone who made carts and wagons though it could also have been used to refer to someone who lived near a cartwright. It comes from Old English wægen meaning "wagon". Origin: Old English  

Winnifred

Winnifred is a variant spelling of Winifred, the anglicized form of Gwenfrewi, a Welsh female name meaning "blessed peace" or "fair peace" from Welsh elements gwen (white, fair, blessed) and frewi (peace, reconciliation). It may also be related to Winfred, an Old English male name meaning "peaceful friend" or "friend of peace" from wine (friend) and frid (peace). Nicknames: Winnie, Win, Fred, Freddie/Freddy Origin: Welsh … Continue reading Winnifred

Wallace

Wallace comes from a Scottish and English surname meaning "Welsh" or "foreigner" from Norman French word waleis (foreign), originally used to refer to someone who was a Welshman or who lived at the border between England and Wales. Nicknames: Wally/Wallie Origin: Norman French Variants: Wallis (English) Walleis Waleis  

Warren

Warren comes from an English surname with a few possible origins: it could be derived from Norman French warrene meaning "animal enclosure" or "game park" possibly originating from Gaulish *varenna (enclosed area) from *varros (stick, post); it may also refer to someone who lived near a game park; it may be derived from a town called La Varenne in Normandy, France; … Continue reading Warren