Wallace

Wallace comes from a Scottish and English surname meaning “Welsh” or “foreigner” from Norman French word waleis (foreign), originally used to refer to someone who was a Welshman or who lived at the border between England and Wales.

Nicknames: Wally/Wallie

Origin: Norman French

Variants:

  • Wallis (English)
  • Walleis
  • Waleis

 

Advertisements

Warren

Warren comes from an English surname with a few possible origins:

  • it could be derived from Norman French warrene meaning “animal enclosure” or “game park” possibly originating from Gaulish *varenna (enclosed area) from *varros (stick, post);
  • it may also refer to someone who lived near a game park;
  • it may be derived from a town called La Varenne in Normandy, France;
  • it may also be derived from an ancient Germanic warin meaning “guard, protect”;
  • Warren is also a word referring to a colony of rabbit burrows.

Nicknames: War

Origin: Gaulish, Germanic

Variants:

  • Warrin (English)
  • Warin (Ancient Germanic, English)
  • Guerino (Italian)
  • Guarin (Medieval French)
  • Guérin (French)

 

Wade

Wade comes from an English surname, either derived from Old English wæd meaning “ford” or “shallow water”, used to refer to someone who lived near a ford; it comes from Proto-Germanic wadą. Wade may also be derived from an Old English given name, Wada, which comes from Old English wadan meaning “to go” from Proto-Germanic wadaną (to wade, to walk) via Proto-Indo-European *weh₂dʰ- (to go, to proceed). In the English language, it’s a word that’s used to refer to someone walking or traversing through water. Wade may also be a Dutch and German surname derived Proto-Germanic wǣd meaning “garment, item of clothing”.

Origin: Proto-Germanic, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Wayde (English)

 

Wolf

Wolf comes from Proto-Germanic *wulfaz via Proto-Indo-European *wĺ̥kʷos (wolf). It’s used to refer to the animal, wolves have long been a symbol of the wild and untamed, but also dangerous and predatory. Wolf can also be a nickname for names such as Wolfgang (meaning “wolf path”) and Wolfram (meaning “wolf raven), as well as also being a surname.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Wulf (German)
  • Wolfe (English)
  • Úlfr (Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Uffe (Danish)
  • Ulf (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)

 

Willow

Willow comes from Old English welig from Proto-Germanic *wiligaz via Proto-Indo-European *wel meaning “to turn, to wind, twist”. Willow is the name of a tree or shrub from the genus Salix, which grows along damp or watery areas. They are tough and flexible. It’s also a surname originally referring to somone who lived near a willow tree.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

 

 

Wilma

Wilma is a female name, originally used as a short form of Wilhelmina, the feminine form of German Wilhelm meaning “willfull protection” or “desiring protection” composed from Germanic elements wil (will, desire) and helm (helmet, protection). It  could also be a feminine form of William.

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Wilhelmina (Dutch, German, English)
  • Willa (English)
  • Wilhelmine (German)
  • Wilhelma (German)
  • Vilma (Spanish, Hungarian, German, Swedish, Finnish, Czech, Slovak, Coatian)
  • Vilhelmiina (Finnish)
  • Vilhelmina (Lithuanian, Swedish)
  • Willamina (English)
  • Male forms:
  • Wilhelm (Ancient Germanic, German, Polish)
  • William (English)
  • Willem (Dutch)
  • Wilhelmus (Dutch)

 

Wynstan

Wynstan is a variant spelling of Wynnstan, an Old English name meaning “joy stone” from elements wynn (joy) and stan (stone). It could also be a variant spelling of Winston, which could either be derived from Wynnstan, or else it derives from the name of a town made up from Old English wine/win (friend) and tun (settlement) meaning “friend’s settlement” or “Wine’s settlement”, Wine being a personal given name from Old English win/wine. It’s also a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Wynnstan (Anglo-Saxon)

 

Winifry

Winifry could be a variant form of Winifred, the anglicized form of Welsh given name Gwenfrewi. The first part of the name comes from Welsh gwen meaning “fair, blessed, white” while the second element frewi might mean “reconciliation, peace” so Winifry essentially means “fair peace” or “blessed peace”. However, Winifry could also be a feminine variant form of Winfred, an Old English male name meaning “peaceful friend” from Old English wine (friend) and frið (peace). Winifry has also been used as a surname, originating from the given name.

Origin: Welsh, Old English

Variants:

  • Winifred (Welsh, English)
  • Winnifred (Welsh, English)
  • Gwenfrewi (Welsh)

 

Male forms:

  • Winfred (English)
  • Winfrith (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Winfried (German)

 

Wilhelmina

Wilhelmina is the feminine form of Wilhelm, the German cognate of William meaning “willful protection” or “desiring protection” made up from Germanic elements wil (will, desire) and helm (helmet, protection”.

Nicknames: Will, Mina, Willie/Willy

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Wilhelmine (German)
  • Wilhelma (German)
  • Wilma (German, Dutch, English)
  • Vilma (Spanish, Hungarian, German, Swedish, Finnish, Czech, Slovak, Coatian)
  • Vilhelmiina (Finnish)
  • Vilhelmina (Lithuanian, Swedish)
  • Willamina (English)

 

Female forms:

  • Wilhelm (Ancient Germanic, German, Polish)
  • William (English)
  • Willem (Dutch)
  • Wilhelmus (Dutch)