Olin

Olin is a unisex name, a feminine form of Oline from Scandinavian male name Ole, the Danish and Norwegian masculine form of Olaf which comes from Old Norse Áleifr meaning “ancestor’s descendant” from Old Norse elements anu (ancestor) and leifr (descendant). Olin could also be the male form of Olina which also comes from the same source as Oline. Spelled Olenit’s the Russian word for “deer” as well as also possibly being a variat of Middle English holin, the word for holly.

As a surname, Olin could be from Germanic element odal meaning “heritage, fatherland”.

Origin: Old Norse, Russian, Middle English, Germanic

Female forms:

  • Oline (Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Finnish, Greenlandic)
  • Olina (Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Greenlandic, Finnish)

 

Male forms:

  • Ole (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Olaf (Danish, Norwegian, German, Dutch, Polish)
  • Olen

 

Terry

Terry is an English unisex name originally used as a diminutive of Terence (which comes from Roman family name Terentius which is of uncertain meaning though it could be derived from Latin terens meaning “rubbing, wearing away” from Latin terere (to rub, to wear out) though it might also be related to Sabine terenus meaning “soft”) or Theresa ( comes from Greek Therasia, the name of an island (the name is of uncertain meaning but has been linked to several possible meanings such as Greek theros “summer”, therizo “to harvest, to reap”, ther “wild beast”, or therao “to hunt”).

As an surname, however, Terry comes from medieval given name Thierry, the Norman French form of Theodoric meaning “ruler of the people” from Germanic elements theud (people) and ric (power); it could also be an anglicized form of Gaelic surname Mac Toirdhealbhaigh meaning “son of Toirdhealbhach”, the latter being a personal given name meaning “one who is like Thor” or “one who is like thunder”; or it’s a French surname deirved from Occitan terrin meaning “earthenware vessel, earthenware vase”, an occupational surname for a potter, which comes from Latin terra (earth).

Origin: Latin, Greek, Germanic, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Terrie
  • Terri
  • Teri

 

Aster

Aster is the name of a flower derived from Greek astḗr meaning “star”. It could also have been used as either a misspelling or a variant spelling of Esther, a name of uncertain etymology though it could be related to Persian meaning “star”; Esther has also been linked to Ishtar, the Mesopotamian goddess of love, fertility, and war, though the meaning is unknown. As a surname, it could be derived from Middle High German agelster meaning “magpie”.

Origin: Greek, Persian

Variants:

  • Astra (English)
  • Astraea (Greek)
  • Astraia (Greek)
  • Esther (English, French, Spanish, Dutch, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish)
  • Ester (Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Czech, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish)

 

Capricorn

Capricorn comes from Latin Capricornus meaning “horned goat” or “having horns like a goat” from Latin capra (goat) and cornu (horn), the name originally referring to a mythical hybrid of a goat fish, a half-goat, half-fish creature with its top half that of a goat and its lower half of a fish. It’s the name of a both a constellation and the tenth sign of the zodiac for those born from December 22 to January 20. Those born under the Capricorn are supposedly serious and diligent, ambitious, resolute, and steady but also spiritual, intutitive, and passionate.

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Capricornus (Latin)

 

Lucky

Lucky is an English word referring to something or someone having or is marked by good luck or someone or something that is fortunate, and often used as a nickname for someone who is lucky though it could also be used as a given name. Lucky is also a surname derived from the given name Luke/Lucas, the English form of Greek Loukas meaning “from Lucania”, the name of a region in southern Italy. Though the name is of uncertain meaning, Lucania could be related to Greek leukos “white”, “light, bright, shining”, a cognate of Latin lux “light”. It could also be derived from the Latin word lucus (a cognate of lucere “shining, bright”) meaning “sacred wood” or Greek lykos meaning “wolf”.

Origin: Greek, Latin

 

Variants:

  • Luck

 

Torcan

Torcan is a male name made up from Old Irish torcc “boar” with the diminutive suffix -an meaning “little boar” or “wild boar”. It also seems to be a Turkish male name possibly meaning “shy, bashful, coy, reserved”. Torcan is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Old Irish, Turkish

Variants:

  • Torcán (Irish)
  • Torccán (Irish)

 

Rayne

Rayne seems to be a variant spelling of Rain on the surface which comes from Old English regn (rain) which might possibly come from Proto-Indo-European *hreg- meaning “moist, wet”. It could also be derived from Germanic element ragin meaning “counsel” and used as a short form of names beginning with the element such as Raymond or Rainer (meaning “advice army”). Rayne could also be a medieval female name derived from Old French reine meaning “queen” from Latin regina; it could also be derived from Old French raine meaning “frog”, derived from Latin rana, as well as also coming from a Scottish place name in Aberdeenshire meaning “strip of land”. Rayne is also a surname.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Germanic, Latin, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Raine (English, Germanic)
  • Rain (English)
  • Reine (French) f
  • Rayna
  • Reina

 

Lyonesse

Lyonesse is the name of a country in Arthurian legend bordering Cornwall, the home of Tristan whose father was its king, as well as also being the site of the final battle between King Arthur and Mordred. It was said to have sunk beneath the waters. It’s also the name of an Arthurian character, Lyonesse, the sister of Lynette, in the story of Gareth and Lynette. Lyonesse does sound like a variant spelling of Lioness, the name of a female lion, though I’ve also seen it listed as being the English form of French of Léoneis or Léonois, the French form of Lodonesia which is the Latin name for Lothian, a region in Scotland. The etymology of Lothian is unknown.

Origin: English

Variants:

  • Lyoness
  • Lioness
  • Lionesse

 

Harlan

Harlan comes from an English surname made up of Old English elements hara (hare), har (gray), hær (rock) and land (land) so the name essentially means “hare land”, “rock land” or “gray land”.

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Harland (English)

 

Beowulf

Beowulf is the name of eponymous hero of the Old English epic poem Beowulf, set in Scandinavia. He fights against the monster Grendel and wins, and later becomes a king of the Geats (a North Germanic tribe living in what is now Southern Sweden), later dying from a fatal found fighting against a dragon. The name comes from Old English beo (bee) and wulf (wolf) meaning “bee wolf”.

Origin: Old English