Draven

Draven seems to come from an English surname; it was popularized by the 1994 movie The Crow based on the comic book series, though the last name was given to the character in the movie. Although the popular consensus seems to be that the name is somehow derived from d’raven meaning “of the raven”, there’s no real accuracy to that statement, along with other meanings I’ve seen attached to the name such as “child of beautiful shadows” and “avenger”, although the accuracy for the last two seem far more murkier. Another possible meaning I’ve seen is that it comes from an Old English word drǽfend meaning “hunter”, but once again I can’t attest to the accuracy of that either.

Origin: English

Variants:

  • Dravin (English)

 

Semiramis

Semiramis is the name of a legendary Assyrian queen who has been associated with the goddess Ishtar. Her name may be a Hellenized form of Shammuramat or Sammuramat which could possibly mean “loving doves” from Akkadian summatu (female dove) and ramu (to love).

Origin: Assyrian

Variants:

  • Semiramide (Italian)
  • Shammuramat (Assyrian)
  • Sammuramat (Assyrian)
  • Sammu-Ramat (Assyrian)

 

Jun

Jun is a Japanese unisex name with various meanings of: 純 “innocent, pure, genuine”, 潤 “moisture”, 淳 “pure”, 順 “order, obey”, 準 “conform, imitate, semi-“, 洵 “alike, truth”, 隼 “falcon”, and likely other meanings depending on the kanji used. It can also be used with other name elements such as Junko, a female name, or Junki, a male name.

Origin: Japanese

 

Yonah

Yonah is the Hebrew form of Jonah meaning “dove” in Hebrew.

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Jonah (English)
  • Jonas (English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch)
  • Yunus (Arabic, Turkish)
  • Ionas (Biblical Greek & Latin)
  • Iona (Russian, Georgian, Biblical Latin)
  • Jonáš (Czech, Slovak)
  • Joona (Finnish)
  • Joonas (Finnish)
  • Jónas (Icelandic)

 

Ingram

Ingram is an English surname derived from Norman French Enguerrand which is the Medieval French form of Engilram, a Germanic name. The second part of the name comes from Germanic hramn (raven) though the first part of the name is a little trickier. It could be from Angil, the name of a Germanic tribe possibly meaning “angel”, though it could also be derived from Proto-Germanic *anguz possibly meaning “narrow, tight”.

Another possible origin for the first element is that it comes from Ing, a Germanic name possibly meaning “ancestor” from Proto-Germanic *Ingwaz; Ing is an Old Norse cognate of Yngvi, the name of an Old Norse fertility god, possibly an alternate name for Freyr, the Norse god of fertility, prosperity, sunshine, and rain.

Origin: Ancient Germanic

 

Alita

Alita is a very rare name, possible a variant of Alethea, a Greek female name meaning “truth”. It could also be a variant spelling of Alida, the Dutch, Hungarian, and German diminutive of Adelaide meaning “noble kind, noble type” from Germanic elements adal (noble) and heid (kind, type, sort). It’s just as likely that Alita could be a short form of Adelita, also a Spanish diminutive of Adela meaning “noble”. It might also come from the Spanish word ala meaning “wing” deriving from Latin; Alita could be a variant form of the word, or it could be a diminutive of it meaning “little wing”.

Alita might also be a variant spelling of Alitta, which was the name given to the goddess Aphrodite in Arabia. According to the Greek historian Herodotus, the name likely derives from Al-Lat meaning “the goddess”, a pre-Islamic Arabian goddess.

It’s also possible that Alita is the feminine singular of alitus, which is the future passive participle of alō, a Latin word meaning “nourishment, sustenance, support” from Proto-Indo-European *h₂életi (grow, nourish).

Origin: Greek, Germanic, Proto-Indo-European, Arabic

Variants:

  • Alida (Dutch, Hungarian, German)
  • Alitta

 

Beck

Beck is an English surname derived from German surname Bach meaning “brook, stream”, a cognate of Old Norse bekkr (stream, brook). It could also be a short form of Becker, another Germanic surname meaning “baker”.

Beck could also be a short form of Beckett, another English surname that comes from the same source as Bach.

It also comes from Middle English beke by way of Old French bec meaning “beak”. It was used as a nickname for someone who had a prominent nose, or which resembled the beak of a bird.

Beck is also a word, used in the idiom “at someone’s beck and call”, referring to someone ready to obey someone’s orders or subject to their slightest whims.

Origin: German, Old Norse, Old French

 

 

Arina

Arina is a Russian variant of Irina, a cognate of Irene meaning “peace”. Irene (also spelled Eirene) is the goddess of peace in Greek mythology. I’ve also seen it listed as being a feminine form of Arni, an Old Norse name meaning “eagle”.

According to Wikipedia, Arina is also a Kurdish feminine name meaning “flower plain” although I can’t attest to the accuracy of that. If anyone knows more about it, please let me know.

Arina is also a Japanese feminine name with different meanings depending on the kanji used. The meanings are listed below at the end, although it’s possible there are other meanings besides the ones I’ve found. I’ve come across this site that shows all the possible kanji that can be used in a name. I don’t have the time, nor the effort, to look up every kanji for the meaning so I’ve listed the ones I’ve already come across. If anyone is interested in the other possible meanings on the site you’ll have to look it up yourself.

Origin: Greek, Old Norse, Japanese

 

Variants:

  • Irina (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Romanian, Finnish, Georgian)
  • Irene (English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Ancient Greek)
  • Eirene (Ancient Greek)

 

*na (奈) is a phonetic character meaning it has no special meaning*

Arina 亜莉奈 (Japanese kanji) “second, Asia+jasmine”

Arina 亜利奈 (Japanese kanji) “second, Asia+advantegous/profit”

Arina 亜梨奈 (Japanese kanji) “second, Asia+pear”

Arina 亜莉菜 (Japanese kanji) “second, Asia+jasmine+vegetables, greens”

Arina 亜利菜 (Japanese kanji) “second, Asia+advantegous/profit+vegetables, greens”

Arina 亜梨菜 (Japanese kanj) “second, Asia+pear+vegetables, greens”

 

*I’ve tried very hard to be as accurate as possible but I’m not a native Japanese speaker nor am I in any way fluent in the language, so there might be some mistakes.

Arden

Arden is a place name and a surname that comes from Celtic *ardwo meaning “high”. It was used as the name of a forest in William Shakespere’s play As You Like It (roughly around 1599), as well as being the name of a real forest in Warwickshire, England. Arden was also the maiden name of Shakespeare’s mother, Mary Arden.

Another possible meaning I’ve seen for Arden is “eagle valley” which comes from Old English earn (eagle) and dun (valley).

Arden is also a word in Spanish, the third person plural of arder meaning “to burn”, derived from Latin ardere. 

Origin: Celtic, Old English, Latin

 

 

 

Penny

Origin: Greek, Germanic

Meaning: Penny is usually used as a nickname for Penelope, a Greek feminine name of uncertain etymology but which could be derived from Greek penelops, referring to a type of duck.

Penelope could be also be derived from Greek pene (threads, weft) and ops (face, eye). This meaning seems more fitting for the character in Greek mythology: Penelope, the wife of Odysseus, who was apparently faithful to him for the twenty years he was gone, despite the many persistant suitors who attempt to woo her with marriage. In an attempt to ward off their persistance, Penelope tells them that she will choose a suitor when she has finished weaving a burial shroud for Odysseus, though every night she undoes some of it to give her more time. This goes on for 3 years before her trick is discovered.

Penelope (or Penelopeia) is also the name of a dryad, the daughter of Dryops and portrayed as the mother of Pan, the god of shepherds and hunters.

Penny is also a coin, an Old English word derived from a Proto-Germanic source of unknown meaning.

Variants:

  • Penelope (Greek)
  • Pénélope (French)
  • Penélope (Spanish, Portuguese)