Maraya

Maraya is a variant spelling of Mariah, itself a variant form of Maria which comes from the Hebrew female name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian source either meaning “beloved” from myr, … Continue reading Maraya

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Edith

Edith is an English female name meaning "wealth, fortune + war" from Old English elements ead (wealth, fortune) from Proto-Germanic *audaz (wealth, riches) and gyð (war). Nicknames: Edie, Dee, Eda (Medieval English) diminutive Origin: Old English, Proto-Germanic Variants: Eadgyð (Old English) Eadgyth (Old English) Editha (English) Edythe (English) Edytha (English) Edita (Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Lithuanian) Édith (French) Edit (Hungarian, Swedish) Edyta … Continue reading Edith

Wyatt

Wyatt comes from an English surname which comes from a medieval given name, Wyot, from Old English Wigheard made up from Old English elements wig (war, battle) via Proto-Germanic *wīgą (fight, battle) from Proto-Indo-European *weyk-; and heard (brave, hardy) essentially meaning "brave in battle". Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Wyat (English) Wyot (Medieval English)  

Mario

Mario is the Italian and Spanish form of Marius, an Ancient Roman family name which could be derived from Latin mas meaning "male" or Latin mare meaning "sea". It could also be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart of the Greek god Ares), a name of uncertain etymology though it's possible that Mars was … Continue reading Mario

Duncan

Duncan is the anglicized form of Gaelic Donnchadh which means "brown battle" from Gaelic donn which comes from Proto-Celtic *dusnos (brown) via Proto-Indo-European *dunnos- (dark), and cath (battle) also derived from a Proto-Indo-European root word. Another possible meaning I've seen for the name is "brown chieftain". Duncan is also a surname derived from the given name. In Shakespeare's Macbeth (1606), Duncan is the king of … Continue reading Duncan

Andromache

Andromache (pr. an-dro-ma-kee) is the name of the wife of the Trojan hero Hector, making her a princess of Troy. The name comes from Ancient Greek aner (man) and mache (battle) either meaning "battle of man", "man's battle", or "fight like a man". When Troy was sacked, their son Astyanax was thrown from the city walls and she as … Continue reading Andromache

Mark

Mark is the English form of Marcus, an Ancient Roman name which seems to be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” though it might also be from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”. … Continue reading Mark

Alvaro

Alvaro is the Italian form of Alvar which comes from Old Norse Alfarr meaning "elf warrior" or "elf army"  from Old Norse elements alfr (elf) and arr (warrior) or herr (army). Alvaro is also a Spanish and Portuguese surname derived from the given name. An alvar is also a type of environment that has poor soil as well as also referring to a group … Continue reading Alvaro

Belinda

Belinda is a female given name of uncertain origin and meaning. Though the first part of the name is often associated with Italian  bella meaning "beautiful" (which comes from Latin bellus "beautiful, pretty, handsome"), the name has an older Germanic source, Betlindis, so it seems more likely that the first element is Germanic in origin. While the second … Continue reading Belinda

Herman

Herman is a male name made up of Germanic elements hari (army) and man (man) meaning "army man". It's also a surname derived from the given name. Origin: Germanic Variants: Hermann (German) Hermanus (Dutch, Ancient Germanic) Hariman (Ancient Germanic) Hermanni (Finnish) Armand (French) Ármann (Icelandic) Armando (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese) Ermanno (Italian) German (Russian)