Duilio

Duilio is the Spanish and Italian form of Duilius, a Roman name possibly derived from Latin duellum meaning “war” derived from Proto-Indo-European *dew- “to injure, destroy, burn”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Duilius (Ancient Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Duilia (Ancient Roman)
  • Duília (Brazilian)

 

Valdis

Valdis is used as a short form of Latvian male name Voldemārs, the Latvian cognate of Germanic Waldemar which is derived from Slavic Vladimir meaning “famous ruler” or “great ruler” or “ruler of the world” from elements vladeti (to rule, to control) and meru (great, famous), though the second element of the name has also been associated with miru meaning “peace, world” so the name could also mean “peaceful ruler” or “world ruler”.

Valdis is also a variant form of Valdís, a female name composed from Old Norse valr “the dead (of battle)” or “the slain (in Valhalla)” and dís (goddess) so the name essentially means “goddess of the slain in battle”. It also seems to be a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Slavic, Old Norse

Variants:

  • Voldemārs (Latvian)
  • Waldemar (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish)
  • Vladimir (Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic)
  • Waldomar (Ancient Germanic)
  • Valdimárr (Old Norse)
  • Wealdmær (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Uladzimir (Belarusian)
  • Vladimír (Czech, Slovak)
  • Valdemar (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Vladimer (Georgian)
  • Valdemaras (Lithuanian)
  • Visvaldas (Lithuanian)
  • Vladimiras (Lithuanian)
  • Voldemaras (Lithuanian)
  • Valdas (Lithuanian short form of Valdemaras)
  • Włodzimierz (Polish)
  • Volodymyr (Ukrainian)
  • Wolodymyr (Ukrainian)
  • Vsevolod (Russian, Ukrainian, Medieval Slavic)
  • Vladilen (Russian contraction of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin)
  • Vladlen (Russian contraction of Vladimir Lenin)

 

Female forms

  • Vladimira (Slovene Croatian)
  • Vladimíra (Czech, Slovak)

 

Arlo

Arlo is an English male name of uncertain meaning. It was used by English poet Edmund Spenser for his epic poem The Faerie Queen (1590-1596) as the name of a place called Arlo Hill which he might have based on a real place name, Aherlow, a Gaelic name meaning “lowland between two high lands” or “between two highlands”. I’ve also seen it listed as being a variant form of Harlow, a surname derived from a place name meaning “rock hill” or “army hill”. It might also be a variant of Carlo, the Italian form of Charles derived from Germanic name Karl meaning “man”. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, connoting the idea of a “free man”.

Several sites have also listed the name as meaning “barberry tree” in Spanish but when I looked it up bérbero was the Spanish word for barberry, not Arlo, so I’m not sure whether it was an older Spanish form of the name or whether it comes from a different dialect.

Origin: Gaelic, Old English, Germanic

Variants:

  • Arlow (English)
  • Arlowe (English)

Kelly

Kelly comes from a surname, an anglicized form of Ó Ceallaigh meaning “descendant of Ceallach”, Ceallach being an Irish given name of uncertain meaning though possible meanings attributed to it are “bright-headed” or perhaps coming from Irish ceallach “war, strife, contention” or Irish ceall meaning “church”. Kelly could also be derived from Scottish Gaelic coille meaning “wooded area” and “grove, forest, woodland”.

Origin: Gaelic

Female forms:

  • Kelley
  • Kelli
  • Kellie
  • Kelleigh

 

Male forms:

  • Kelley
  • Ceallach (Irish)
  • Ceallagh (Irish)
  • Ceallachán (Irish)

 

Onika

Onika is an African female name though there doesn’t seem to be a lot of accurate information on it. I’ve seen it with various meanings of “warrior”, or it could be derived from Yoruba meaning “one in possession of”, or it could be a short form of Onyekachi, an Igbo name meaning “who is greater than God?” Onika is also a Maori word meaning “onyx”. Spelled Oni-ka (鬼化) it’s a Japanese word meaning “devil”.

Origin: African, Maori, Japanese

Variants:

  • Oneika
  • Onyeka (short form of Onyekachi)

 

Corin

Corin is the French masculine form of Quirinus, a Latin name meaning “spear” or “lance” from Sabine quiris. In Roman mythology, Quirinus was a Sabine god who was later absorbed into the Roman pantheon, as well as being an epithet of Janus, the Roman god of beginnings, doorways, and endings. Corin could also be a variant form of Corinne, which is the French form of Greek Corinna meaning “maiden”. Corin could also be related to Cures, the name of an ancient Sabine town, or perhaps from Latin curia meaning “court”. It could also be derived from Cyrene (originally pronounced ky-ree-nee), the name of an ancient town in Libya named after a nymph beloved by the Greek god Apollo; her name could be derived from Greek kuros meaning “supreme power”.

Origin: Sabine, Greek

Variants:

  • Coren

 

Umberto

Umberto is the Italian form of Humbert, a Germanic name meaning “bright warrior” or “bright bear cub” from Germanic elements hun (warrior, bear cub) and beraht (bright). I’ve also seen the first element of the name hun as being connected to the Huns, a nomadic tribe who came from somewhere between the Caucasus and Central Asia. Humbert is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Humbert (German, French, English)
  • Hunberct (Ancient Germanic)
  • Humberto (Spanish, Portuguese)

 

Female forms:

  • Umberta (Italian)

 

Hilda

Hilda comes from Germanic element hild meaning “battle” as well as being a nickname for any name beginning with Hilde such as Hildebrand or Hildred. Hilda is also a cogante of Old Norse Hildr, the name of a Valkyrie in Norse mythology who had the power to revive the dead.

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Hildy (English)
  • Hylda (English)
  • Hilde (German, Dutch, Norwegian)
  • Hildur (Icelandic, Norwegian)
  • Hild (Old English)
  • Hildr (Ancient Scandinavian, Norse mythology)
  • Ilda (Italian)
  • Elda (Italian)

 

Risa

Risa is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used, made of Japanese elements ri meaning: 梨 “pear”, 里 “village, hometown”, 理 “reason, logic”, “jasmine”; and sa meaning: 紗 “gauze”, 沙 “sand”,  “assistant, help”; and likely other meanings. It could also be a short form of names like Parisa, a Persian name meaning “fairy, like a fairy” or Marisa, a combination of given names Maria (the Latin form of Mary which ultimately comes from Hebrew female name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr “love”) and Luisa (the feminine form of Luis, the Spanish form of Louis ultimately derived from a Germanic name meaning “famous war/battle”

Risa is also the Spanish word for “laughter, laugh” which comes from Latin risus/rideo. 

Origin: Japanese, Persian, Hebrew, Germanic, Latin

 

Variants:

  • Marisa
  • Parisa