Leatrice

Leatrice seems to be a combination of two names, Leah (a Hebrew female name possibly meaning “weary, languid, tired” though it’s also been associated with the meaning of “cow”. It might also be related to an Akkadian word meaning “mistress”); and Beatrice, the Italian form of Beatrix which means ‘”happy” or “blessed” from Latin beatus, taking on the meaning of “she who makes happy” or it could be a variant form of Viatrix, also from Latin meaning “female traveler/voyager”. It’s just as likely that Leatrice is a variant spelling of Liatris, the name of a genus of flowers also known as blazing star and gayfeather, native to North America (including Mexico and the Bahamas). I couldn’t find anything behind the name.

Origin: Hebrew, Akkadian, Latin

 

Variants:

  • Liatris

 

Risa

Risa is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used, made of Japanese elements ri meaning: 梨 “pear”, 里 “village, hometown”, 理 “reason, logic”, “jasmine”; and sa meaning: 紗 “gauze”, 沙 “sand”,  “assistant, help”; and likely other meanings. It could also be a short form of names like Parisa, a Persian name meaning “fairy, like a fairy” or Marisa, a combination of given names Maria (the Latin form of Mary which ultimately comes from Hebrew female name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr “love”) and Luisa (the feminine form of Luis, the Spanish form of Louis ultimately derived from a Germanic name meaning “famous war/battle”

Risa is also the Spanish word for “laughter, laugh” which comes from Latin risus/rideo. 

Origin: Japanese, Persian, Hebrew, Germanic, Latin

 

Variants:

  • Marisa
  • Parisa

 

Hedwin

Hedwin could be a variant spelling of Heddwyn, a Welsh male name meaning “blessed peace” or “fair, white peace” from Welsh elements hedd (peace) and gwyn (white, fair, blessed). Hedwin has also been used as a female name, perhaps from a Germanic name meaning “battle bliss” or “battle joy” from Germanic element hadu (battle) and Anglo-Saxon wynn (joy, bliss). It could also simply be a variant of Hedwig meaning “battle war”.

Origin: Welsh, Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Heddwen (Welsh female form of Heddwyn).

 

Corliss

Corliss comes from an English surname meaning “carefree person” or “cheerful person” from Old English carleas (careless, reckless, free from care). It likely originated as a nickname for a carefree person or someone who was always happy.

Origin: Old English

 

Zelda

Zelda was originally used as a nickname for Griseldaa female given name meaning “gray battle” from Germanic elements gris (gray) and hild (battle), though it’s now used as a given name in its own right.

Zelda is also a Yiddish name, the feminine form of Selig, meaning “blessed, happy” in Yiddish.

Origin: Germanic, Yiddish

Variants:

  • Selda (English)
  • Griselda
  • Grizel (Scottish)
  • Griselda (Spanish)
  • Zelde (Yiddish)
  • Zilda (English)

 

Male forms:

  • Selig (Yiddish)
  • Zelig (Yiddish)

 

Edwin

Edwin is an English male name composed from Old English elements ead (wealth, fortune, riches, blessed, happiness) and wine (friend) meaning “rich friend”, “blessed friend” or “happy friend”.

Nicknames: Ed, Eddy/Eddie, Win/Wyn

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Edwyn (English)
  • Eadwine (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Edvin (Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian)
  • Audun (Old Norse)

 

Female forms:

  • Edwina (English)
  • Edweena (English)
  • Edwena (English)
  • Edwyna (English)

 

Gaius

Gaius is a Roman given name though one of uncertain etymology. It could be derived from Latin gaudere meaning “to rejoice”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from Gaia, a feminine name meaning “earth” in Greek, or perhaps from an Etruscan source that has long since lost its meaning. Apparently it was a very common given name to the point that it became a generic term for a man, with Gaia being a generic term for a woman, as well as being used in marriage ceremonies- ex: “where you are Gaius, I am Gaia”.

Origin: Latin, Greek, Etruscan

Variants:

  • Caius (Ancient Roman)
  • Gaios (Ancient Greek)
  • Caio (Portugese)
  • Gaioz (Georgian)
  • Kajus (Lithuanian)

 

Female forms:

  • Gaia (Ancient Roman, Ancient Greek)
  • Caia (Ancient Roman)

 

Rona

Rona is the feminine form of Hebrew male name Ron meaning “song, joy”, as well as being the name of two islands in Scotland. Known as North Rona and South Rona, the name comes from Old Norse meaning “rough island”. It’s also a surname although I couldn’t find a specific meaning behind it, or if it’s derived from the island of Rona.

Rona is also the name of a figure in Maori mythology. She had gone to the river to get some water one night when the moon was hidden behind some clouds. When she was returning home, Rona stepped on a root in the ground and was so upset she began to curse at the moon. The moon heard her and, angered, grabbed her. Rona grabbed onto a tree but was dragged away into the sky. There seems to be another version of the myth in which Rona is a male who is looking around for his wife although I’m not quite sure of it. I couldn’t find a meaning behind the name in Maori.

Origin: Hebrew, Old Norse

Variants:

  • Rhona
  • Rònaigh (Scots Gaelic)

 

Male forms:

  • Ron (Hebrew)