Hannibal

Hannibal is the name of a famous Carthaginian general who is considered one of the greatest military generals in history and caused the Ancient Romans great fear. His name comes from Phoenician haan (grace) combined with the name Ba’al meaning “grace of Ba’al”, Ba’al being the name of the chief god of the Phoenician pantheon which means “lord, husband”. Hannibal is also a surname, either derived from the given name or else a variant spelling of Hunnibal or Hunnabell, an Old English surname perhaps derived from Germanic given name Hunnbald meaning “brave bear cub” from Germanic elements hunn (bear cub) and bald (bold, brave). It may also be a derivative of female given name Anabel derived from Late Latin Amabilis meaning “lovable”.

Origin: Phoenician, Germanic, Late Latin

Variants:

  • Annibale (Italian)
  • Aníbal (Spanish, Portuguese)

 

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Moria

Moria is a female given name with several etymologies and meanings:

  • it’s a the name of a Naiad nymph in Greek mythology whose brother Tylos was killed by a dragon, though she later brought him back to life with a magical herb. This myth is similar to the story of Pelops, who had been killed by his father Tantalus but was brought back to life by the Moirai, the three goddesses of fate. It appears this myth might have its origins in Lydian mythology; the name may be related to Ancient Greek moros meaning “fate, doom”. Moros is also the name of the personification of impending doom in Greek mythology, who drove men to their fated death and who not even Zeus could go against;
  • Moria is also the name of a type of olive tree which were considered the property of the state, a gift given from the goddess Athena to the people of Athens, so it’s possible the name also means “olive tree”;
  • it’s the name of an underground compound in J.R.R. Tolkien’s fictional world of Middle-Earth; it comes from his fictional language of Sindarin meaning “black chasm” or “black pit” from mor (black) and ia (void, abyss, pit);
  • it may also be a variant spelling of Moriah, the name of a mountain in the Book of Genesis in which Abraham is instructed to take his son Isaac and sacrifice him to God; the name possibly means “chosen by Yahweh” or “seen by Yahweh”;

Moria is also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used such as:

  • “forest; woods + Asia; rank next; come after; -ous” (森亜);
  • “forest; woods + love; affection; favorite” (森愛);
  • “guard; protect; defend; obey + Asia; rank next; come after; -ous” (守亜);
  • “woods; grove + Asia; rank next; come after; -ous” (杜亜)

Origin: Ancient Greek, Sindarin, Hebrew, Japanese

Variants:

  • Moriah (Hebrew, English)

 

Lyndon

Lyndon comes from an English surname meaning “lime tree hill” or “flax hill” from Old English elements lind (lime tree) derived from Proto-Germanic *linþaz (flexible, supple, mild), or lin (flax) and dun (hill). It was originally used as a topographical name for someone who lived near lime trees.

Origin: Old English, Proto-Germanic

Variants:

  • Lindon (English)
  • Linden (English)

 

Bailey

Bailey is a unisex given name which comes from an English surname with several possible meanings:

  • it’s an occupational surname meaning “bailiff”, referring to someone who was an officer of the court, similar to a sheriff or a sheriff’s deputy in charge with keeping order; it derives from Latin bāiulus (carrier, porter; manager, steward);
  • it also refers to the outermost wall of a castle which comes from Old French baille meaning “stake, palisade, brace”, perhaps derived from Latin baculum (stick, staff, scepter, rod) from Proto-Indo-European *bak- (stick);
  • it may also be a locational surname meaning “berry wood”, referring to someone who lived near such a place, from Old English beg (berry) and leah (woodland).

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Bailee (English)
  • Baylee (English)
  • Baylie (English)

 

Pan

Pan is the name of a Greek god of the wild, nature, shepherds, and flocks, depicted as a man with the horns, legs, and tail of a goat, and who often played the pan-pipes. His name is somewhat tricky to pin down- it may be related to Greek pan meaning “all”; it could mean “shepherd” or it may come from an old Arcadian word for “rustic”, since Pan’s homeland was Arcadia. However, it’s believed that Pan is a cognate of Pushan, a Hindu god, in charge of the nourishment and protection of cattle; both their names may be from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂- (to protect, to shepherd). Pan is also a short form of names like Pandora or any name beginning with Pan.

Pan is also a Chinese surname, also common in Korean and Vietnamese, meaning “water in which rice has been rinsed” from the character , though there may be other meanings depending on the character; it’s also a Spanish and Occitan surname meaning “bread” from Latin panis (bread), an occupational name for a baker or a pantryman, as well as a Polish, Ukrainian, and Yiddish surname meaning “lord; master; landowner” from a Slavic word.

Origin: Greek, Proto-Indo-European, Chinese, Latin, Slavic

 

 

Klervi

Klervi is a Breton female name, the Breton form of Welsh Creirwy possibly meaning “token of the egg” or “mundane egg” from Welsh creir (a token, sacred object, jewel, treasure) while the second part -wy might be from Middle Welsh meaning “egg”. In Welsh mythology, Creiry is the daughter of the enchantress Ceridwen.

Origin: Welsh

Variants:

  • Creiry (Welsh)

 

Saeran

Saeran seems to be a male name possibly of Irish origin maning “noble” although I’m not sure of the accuracy of that. I’ve also seen it listed as coming from Welsh Saer meaning “carpenter, wright” with the diminutive suffix -an meaning “Saer the younger” or “little Saer”. There’s a church in Wales called St. Saeran’s Church dedicated to Saint Saeran, a Celtic bishop.

Saeran also seems to be a Korean male name (also spelled Serran) written with Korean hangul meaning “three + that/what is called” or “bird + that/what is called” though it has several meanings in hanja (Korean reading of Chinese characters) with the 세 (se) reading such as:

  • 世 (generation; world; society; lifetime)

  • 稅 (tax; duty)
  • 勢 (power, force; energy; military strength)

  • 歲 (year; age)
  • 細 (fine, thin; slender)
  • 洗 (to wash)
  • 貰 (get; have; obtain)
  • 笹 (bamboo grass)
  • 說 (explain; seek; talk)

and with the 란 (ran): 

  • 欄 (column)
  • 卵 (egg, ovum)
  • 蘭 (orchid)

Origin: Irish, Welsh, Korean

Variants:

  • Serran
  • Seran

 

Koda

Koda is not an easy name to find much information on. It could be a Native American male name meaning “the allies, friends”, a short form or a variant form of Dakota. Koda is also a Japanese surname with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used, such as:

  • “country+ borough, urban prefecture, storehouse, govt. office, representative body + rice field, rice paddy” (國府田);
  • “armor, high (voice), carapace, shell, A grade, first class, former, instep + rice field, rice paddy” (甲田);
  • “happiness, luck + rice field, rice paddy” (倖田);
  • “happiness, blessing, fortune + rice field, rice paddy” (幸田);
  • “incense, smell, perfume + rice field, rice paddy” (香田);
  • “going, journey, line (of text), row, bank + rice field, rice paddy”; and likely other meanings depending on the kanji used. Also spelled Kouda and Kouta and Kōd.

Koda could also be a variant spelling of Coda which comes from Latin meaning “tail”

Origin: Native American, Japanese, Latin

Variants:

  • Coda

 

Kyri

Kyri (pr. kee-ree or kye-ree) could be a variant spelling of Kyrie, which comes from the Greek phrase Kyrie eleison meaning “Lord, have mercy”, the vocative form of Kyrios meaning “lord” or “master”. It could also be another form of Kiri, a Maori female name meaning “peel”, “skin” or “bark, rind” referring to the “bark of a tree” as well as an Indonesian and Malay word meaning “left”. Kiri is also a Maltese word meaning “hire” or “rental”, an Estonian word meaning “writing”, “letter”, “script”, as well as a Japanese female name meaning “pear tree” (樹梨) or “fog, mist” () though there are other meanings depending on the kanji used. It’s also the word for the paulownia tree (桐). Kyri is also a surname, likely derived from the Greek meaning of the name.

Origin: Greek, Maori, Indonesian, Malay, Maltese, Estonian, Japanese

Variants:

  • Kyrie (Ancient Greek, English)
  • Kiri (Maori, Indonesian, Malay, Maltese, Estonia, Japanese, English)
  • Kyria (Ancient Greek)

 

Male forms:

  • Kyrios (Ancient Greek)
  • Kyriakos (Ancient Greek)