Gilroy

Gilroy comes from a surname, the anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Ruaidh meaning “son of the red-haired youth” or it could be derived from Mac Giolla Rí meaning “son of the king’s servant”.

Origin: Gaelic

 

 

Apollo

Apollo is the Greek god of prophecy, medicine, the sun, light, music, poetry, plague and disease, and one of the most important gods in both the Greek and Roman pantheon. He is the twin brother of Artemis and often associated with the sun (and Artemis the moon), and the son of Zeus and Leto. His name is of uncertain etymology and meaning though the ancient Greeks often associated it with the Greek apollymi meaning “to destroy”. It’s also been associated with Doric apella “wall”, later referring to an assembly. Other possible theories regarding the name link it to Indo-European apelo “strength”, Greek apolusis “to redeem”, apolousis “purification”, apoloúōn “washing”, apolúōn “delivering”, aploun “simple”, and aei bállōn “always shooting (arrows)”. However, it seems more likely that Apollo is pre-Greek in origin, perhaps related to Appaliunas, an Anatolian god  whose name possibly means “father light” or “father lion”, though it could also be related to the name of a Hittite god related to Aplu, a Hurrian and Hittite god of plague and healing; the name might be derived from Akkadian Aplu Enlil meaning “the son of Enlil”, a title given to the Mesopotamian god Nergal (who was the god of war, pestilence, and death), though I’ve also seen it listed as meaning “father light” or “father lion”. Appaliunas might also have a Luwian etymology (Luwian being an ancient language related to Anatolian and closely related to Hittite) from *appal- meaning “trap, snare, pitfall, ambush”.

Origin: Indo-European, Greek, Akkadian

Variants:

  • Apollon (Ancient Greek)
  • Apollinaris (Ancient Greek)
  • Apollonios (Ancient Greek)
  • Apollinaire (French)
  • Apolinary (Polish)
  • Apolinar (Spanish)
  • Apollodorus (Ancient Greek)
  • Apollodoros (Ancient Greek)

 

Female forms:

  • Apolla
  • Apollonia (Ancient Greek, Italian)
  • Apollodora (Ancient Greek)
  • Apolena (Slovak, Czech)
  • Apolonia (Spanish, Polish)
  • Apolline (French)

Atalya

Atalya is a variant spelling of Athalia, a Hebrew female name meaning “Yahweh is exalted”, or a variant spelling of Attalia, the ancient name of Antalya, a city in Turkey. The name seems to be derived from the name of its founder, Attalos (also spelled Attalus). Though the etymology behind his name is uncertain, it might be derived from Greek atalos meaning “tender, delicate”, or it could be a diminutive of atta meaning “father”.

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Athaliah (Hebrew)
  • Athalia (Hebrew)
  • Atalia (Hebrew)
  • Athalie (French)
  • Attalia
  • Antalya

 

Male forms:

  • Attalos (Ancient Greek)
  • Attalus (Ancient Greek)

 

Julian

Julian is the English form of Iulianus (or Julianus), an Ancient Roman family name meaning “belonging to Julius”, Julius a name of uncertain meaning though it could possibly be derived from Greek ioulos meaning “downy-bearded”, implying someone who was youthful, though it could also be related to Iovis, the older form of Latin Iuppiter (Jupiter), the name of the chief god in the Roman pantheon. His name is derived from Indo-European *Dyeus-paterpater meaning “father” while Dyeus meaning “shine” or “sky”.

Although Julian is commonly used as a boy’s  name, it was also a popular girl’s name in medieval times, used as the medieval vernacular form of Juliana eventually becoming Gillian.

Origin: Latin, Indo-European

Variants:

  • Julyan (Medieval English)
  • Jolyon (Medieval English)
  • Iulianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Julianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Julen (Basque)
  • Yulian (Bulgarian, Russian)
  • Julien (French)
  • Giuliano (Italian)
  • Iulian (Romanian, Ancient Roman)
  • Julián (Spanish)

 

Female forms:

  • Julianna (English, Hungarian, Polish)
  • Juliana (English, Dutch, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman)
  • Iuliana (Ancient Roman, Romanian)
  • Julianne (English)
  • Juliane (German, French)
  • Jillian (English)
  • Gillian (English)
  • Yuliana (Bulgarian, Russian, Indonesian)
  • Yulianna (Russian)
  • Uliana (Russian)
  • Ulyana (Russian)
  • Julienne (French)
  • Julijana (Croatian, Slovene, Serbian, Macedonian)
  • Giuliana (Italian)
  • Leanna (English)
  • Liana (Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, English)

 

Kato

Kato is an African male name meaning “second of twins” in Luganda, as well as also being a Japanese surname (also spelled Katō or Katou) meaning “increase wisteria” (加藤) though it could have other meanings if other kanji are used. It’s pronounced ka-toe in Japanese. Kato could also be a variant spelling of Cato, an Ancient Roman cognomen meaning “wise” in Latin. Cato is also a Dutch diminutive of Catharina, the Dutch and Swedish form of Katherine. Katherine comes from Greek name Aikaterine though the etymology behind the name is not certain. It could be derived from another Greek name, Hekaterine from hekateros meaning “each of the two” or from Hecate, the name of the Greek goddess of witchcraft, the underworld, and crossroads, from hekas possibly meaning “far off” though another theory states it comes from a Greek word meaning “will”. It might also be derived from Greek aikia “torture”. Katherine could also be from a Coptic name meaning “my consecration of your name”. The spelling of the name was later changed to be associated with Greek katharos “pure”.

Origin: East African (Luganda), Japanese, Latin, Greek, Coptic

Variants:

  • Kató (Icelandic, Hungarian)
  • Cato (Ancient Roman, Dutch, English)

 

King

King comes from Old English cyning meaning “king, ruler”, which is derived from Proto-Germanic *kuninggaz, coming from “kin, family, clan”, originally used in reference to someone who was a leader of the people or perhaps someone born of noble birth. It’s used as a royal title referring to a male monarch, though in the modern world it’s used less for someone who’s descended from noble birth and more as a modern appellation (or even from a woman’s maiden name). As a surname, it came about as a nickname for someone who acted in a kingly manner or someone who played the part of a king in a pageant.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

 

Seiya

Seiya is a Japanese male name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used. Some meanings I could find are: 世哉 “world, generation”; 星矢 “star, planet, heavenly body + arrow”; 清耶 “clear, distinct, apparent, pure + father”; 正夜 “correct, righteous + night”; 生八 “life, existence, being + eight”; 成也 “to become, to succeed, accomplish + to be, also, too”; 声弥 “voice + extensive, full, complete”; 盛哉 “prosper”; 聖野 “holy, sacred + area, field”; 世乎 “world, generation + seem to, as if”; 西椰 “west + coconut tree”; 征椰 “conquer, subdue, vanquish + coconut tree”. Though there are likely many more meanings than this.

Origin: Japanese

 

Clary

Clary is the name of a species of herbs in the genus Salvia, Salvia sclarea, also known as the clary sage (and clear eye since it was used to clear up one’s eyesight), which when distilled into oil has been used as a seasoning, in perfumes, and used to help with eye problems, good for digestion and the kidneys as well as helping women during their menstrual cycles, and used in aromatherapy to help with anxiety and stress. Though the etymology behind the name is uncertain, it has been linked to Latin clarus meaning “clear, bright, famous”. Clary is also a surname, from Irish surname McClary/McCleary, the Anglicized form of Mac Cleirich meaning “son of the cleric”, though it might also come from Latin clarus.

Clary can also be used as a nickname for Clarissa, which is also derived from Latin clarus.

Origin: Latin, Gaelic

 

Trick

Trick is a nickname for Patrick comes from Latin Patricius meaning “patrician” used to refer to the elite of the Roman aristocracy descended from the founding fathers of Rome, derived from Latin patres (father). It has since attained the idea of “nobleman, noble”.

Trick is also an English word meaning “to cheat, deceive” and refers to someone playing a prank. It’s derived from Old Northern French trique from trikier meaning “to deceive, to cheat” which could be from Latin tricari meaning “be evasive, shuffle”

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Patrick