Lukan

Lukan is a variant spelling of Lucan, derived from Roman Lucanus meaning “from Lucania”, referring to someone who came from the city of Lucania located in southern Italy. The name seems to be derived from Ancient Greek *leukos meaning “white” and “bright, shining”, or it could be derived from Latin lucus meaning “sacred wood” or “sacred grove” (lucus is also a cognate of lucere meaning “shining, bright” from the same root word as *leukos). Lucan is also a place name in Ireland, deriving its name from Gaelic Leamhcán meaning “place of the elms” from leamhán (elm) and ceann (headland, point).

As well as being a given name, Lukan is also a surname which seems to be derived from the given name. Lucan is also the name of a character in the Arthurian legend, a knight of the Round Table, as well as Butler of the royal court.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Latin, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Lucan (English, Ancient Roman)
  • Lucanus (Ancient Roman)
  • Loukanos (Ancient Greek)

 

Mika

Mika is a Japanese female name with various meanings depending on the kanji used. It’s made up of Japanese mi with various meanings of “beautiful”, 実 “reality, truth”, 味 “taste, flavor”, 光 “light”, and ka meaning “beautiful, good, excellent”, “fragrance”, “add, addition, increase”, “praise, auspicious”, though there are likely other meanings depending on the kanji used.

Mika is also a Finnish male name, a short form of Mikael, the Scandinavian and Finnish form of Michael meaning “who is like God?”, a rhetorical question implying there is no one like God. Mika is also a Slavic surname, a patrynomic surname. It’s also possible that Mika could be a nickname for Michaela/Mikaela, the feminine form of Michael.

Origin: Japanese, Hebrew

Hikaru

Hikaru is a Japanese unisex name meaning “light” with the kanji or “brightness” with the kanji. Because it’s a unisex name, some kanji characters are used specifically for females while others are used for males only. Some kanji characters used for females are: 光佳留 “light + beautiful, good, excellent + to stay, to keep, to remain, to study abroad”; 光流 “light + to flow, current, flow, stream; to drift, to wander”; 光海 “light + sea, ocean”; 光留 “light + to stay, to keep, to remain, to study abroad”; 妃夏瑠 “a ruler’s wife, queen, empress + summer + precious stone, gem, lapis lazuli”; 妃華瑠 “a rulers wife, queen, empress + flower, splendor + precious stone, gem, lapis lazuli”; 妃香瑠 “a ruler’s wife, queen, empress + fragrance, fragrant + precious stone, gem, lapis lazuli”; while some kanji used for men are: 光琉 “light + precious stone, gem, lapis lazuli”; 太陽 “sun”; “clear”; and 流星 “to flow, current, flow, stream; to drift, to wander + star”; 弘明 “to spread, enlarge, expand, great + clear, tomorrow, bright”; and many more depending on the kanji.

Origin: Japanese

Seiya

Seiya is a Japanese male name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used. Some meanings I could find are: 世哉 “world, generation”; 星矢 “star, planet, heavenly body + arrow”; 清耶 “clear, distinct, apparent, pure + father”; 正夜 “correct, righteous + night”; 生八 “life, existence, being + eight”; 成也 “to become, to succeed, accomplish + to be, also, too”; 声弥 “voice + extensive, full, complete”; 盛哉 “prosper”; 聖野 “holy, sacred + area, field”; 世乎 “world, generation + seem to, as if”; 西椰 “west + coconut tree”; 征椰 “conquer, subdue, vanquish + coconut tree”. Though there are likely many more meanings than this.

Origin: Japanese

 

Clarabel

Clarabel is a variant spelling of Claribel, an elaborate form of Clara, the female form of Clarus meaning meaning “clear, bright, famous”. There was a character named Claribel in Shakespeare’s The Tempest (1610-1611), as well as having been used by Alfred, Lord Tennyson and Edmund Spenser for his epic poem The Faerie Queen (1590-1596).

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Claribel
  • Clarabelle
  • Claribell
  • Claribelle

 

Helena

Helena is the Latinate form of Helen, the English form of Helene, an Ancient Greek name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to Greek helene meaning “torch” or “corposant”, though it might also be linked to selene meaning “moon”. Helena has different pronounciations depending on where you’re from. It’s he-LE-nah, hay-LAY-nah or he-le-nah. I prefer the he-le-nah pronounciation.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Helen (English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek)
  • Helene (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Greek,
  • Heleen (Dutch)

 

Marko

Marko is the Slavic cognate of Mark, the English form of Marcus which seems to be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” though it might also be from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”.

However, it’s possible that Mars is related to a much older source, perhaps from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture), his name of unknown meaning. Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavors, a cognate of Oscan Mamers, which could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”.

Mars could also be derived from the same Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”, which would make sense since Mars is the god of war.

Marko is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Markos (Ancient Greek)
  • Marcus (Ancient Roman, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Markus (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Mark (English, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Marc (French, Catalan, Welsh)
  • Markku (Finnish)
  • Margh (Cornish)
  • Marek (Czech, Polish, Slovak)
  • Marco (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch)
  • Maleko (Hawaiian)
  • Márk (Hungarian)
  • Marcas (Irish, Scottish)
  • Markuss (Latvian)
  • Mars

 

Marcel

Marcel comes from Marcellus, a Roman family name that was originally a diminutive of given name Marcus which seems to be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” though it might also be from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”.

However, it’s possible that Mars is related to a much older source, perhaps from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture), his name of unknown meaning. Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavors, a cognate of Oscan Mamers, which could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”.

Mars could also be derived from the same Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”, which would make sense since Mars is the god of war.

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Marcellus (Ancient Roman, German, Dutch)
  • Marceli (Polish)
  • Marcell (Hungarian, German)
  • Marzell (German)
  • Martzel (Basque)
  • Marcello (Italian)
  • Marcelo (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Marcellin (French)

 

Female forms:

  • Marcellina (Ancient Roman)
  • Marcella (Ancient Roman, German, Italian)
  • Marceline (French)
  • Marcelline (French)
  • Marcelle (French)
  • Marcellette (French)
  • Marcelyn (English)
  • Marcelina (Polish)
  • Marcela (Spanish, Polish, Romanian, Czech)
  • Marsaili (Scottish)

 

Twyla

Twyla is a variant spelling of Twila, a name of uncertain etymology though it could perhaps be based on the English word twilight, referring to the period before sunrise and after sunset during which a soft light is seen in the skyThe word comes from Old English twi (double, half) and light (light) essentially meaning “second light” or “half light”. Another possible meaning is that it’s based on the French word étoile meaning “star”.

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Twila
  • Twilight (unisex)