Gita

Gita is an Indian female name meaning “song” from Sanskrit gītā (song). The Bhagavad Gita (the divine song) is a Hindu epic poem in which the god Krishna and the prince Arjuna have a philosophical dialogue about the righteousness of battle against friends and family (Arjuna is about to battle his own cousin). 

Origin: Sanskrit

Variants:

  • Geet (Hindi, Urdu)

 

Bellicent

Bellicent could be an Old French form of Belissendis, a Germanic name made of elements bili (gentle, kind, fitting, suitable, proper) and swind (strong, brave, powerful) so essentially meaning “gentle power” or “gentle strength”. It could also possibly be related to Belenus, the name of a Celtic god of the sun, whose name possibly means “bright, brilliant”

In the Arthurian legends, Bellicent is the half-sister of King Arthur (though in some versions she goes by Morgause) and is the mother of Gareth and Gawain.

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Belisent
  • Belisant

 

Lukan

Lukan is a variant spelling of Lucan, derived from Roman Lucanus meaning “from Lucania”, referring to someone who came from the city of Lucania located in southern Italy. The name seems to be derived from Ancient Greek *leukos meaning “white” and “bright, shining”, or it could be derived from Latin lucus meaning “sacred wood” or “sacred grove” (lucus is also a cognate of lucere meaning “shining, bright” from the same root word as *leukos). Lucan is also a place name in Ireland, deriving its name from Gaelic Leamhcán meaning “place of the elms” from leamhán (elm) and ceann (headland, point).

As well as being a given name, Lukan is also a surname which seems to be derived from the given name. Lucan is also the name of a character in the Arthurian legend, a knight of the Round Table, as well as Butler of the royal court.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Latin, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Lucan (English, Ancient Roman)
  • Lucanus (Ancient Roman)
  • Loukanos (Ancient Greek)

 

Ambrose

Ambrose is the English form of Latin Ambrosius, derived from Greek Ambrosios meaning “immortal”. In Greek mythology, ambrosia is the food of the gods which also bestowed immortality on those who ate it. Ambrose is also another name for Merlin, the wizard who helps King Arthur in Arthurian legend, known as Merlin Ambrosius. It’s also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Ambrosius (Latin)
  • Ambrosios (Greek)
  • Ambrogio (Italian)- Ambrogino and Giotto are Italian diminutives of the name
  • Ambroise (French)
  • Ambrosio (Spanish)
  • Ambrósio (Portuguese)
  • Ambrus (Hungarian)
  • Emrys (Welsh)
  • Ambrozije (Croatian)
  • Ambrož (Slovene, Czech)
  • Ambroos (Dutch)- Broos is the Dutch and Limburgish diminutive of the name
  • Ambrosi (Georgian)
  • Ambroży (Polish)
  • Amvrosiy (Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian)
  • Amvrosy (Russian)

 

Female forms:

  • Ambrosia (Ancient Greek)
  • Ambrosine (English)
  • Ambrosette (English)

 

Gareth

Gareth is the name of one of the Knights of the Round Table in the Arthurian legends, the son of Lot and Morgause, Arthur’s older half-sister, which makes him Arthur’s nephew. The name first appeared in Thomas Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur, based on the name Gahariet, an Old French form of the name. The etymology behind the name is uncertain though it has been linked to Welsh gwaredd meaning “gentleness”. It could also be connected to another name, Geraint, the Welsh form of Latin Gerontius meaning “old man” from Greek geron. Other possible meanings I’ve come across is that it might be from Welsh Gweir “grass”, “hay”, “collar”, “loop” or “bend” or Gweirydd “Gweir + lord”, or that it could be from Old Welsh gwrhyt “valor”.

Origin: Welsh, Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Gahariet (Medieval French)
  • Gaharet
  • Gahareth
  • Gariet

 

Moon

Moon comes from Old English mona from Proto-Germanic *menon- from Proto-Indo-European me(n)ses meaning “month, moon” from *meh “to measure”. Moon is also a Korean surname from Chinese Wen meaning “literature, culture, writing”, as well as being an English surname with several possible origins behind it: it may have originated from Cornish mon “thin”, originally a nickname for a thin or slender person; it also derives from a place name in France, a village called Moyon. It could also have risen from Anglo-Norman moun or mon meaning “monk”, a nickname for someone who lived like a monk, or it could be from an Anglicized form of Gaelic surname Ó Mocháin “descendant of Mochán”, the latter meaning “early, timely”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Korean, Cornish, Anglo-Norman

Variants:

  • Mun (Korean)

 

Clarabel

Clarabel is a variant spelling of Claribel, an elaborate form of Clara, the female form of Clarus meaning meaning “clear, bright, famous”. There was a character named Claribel in Shakespeare’s The Tempest (1610-1611), as well as having been used by Alfred, Lord Tennyson and Edmund Spenser for his epic poem The Faerie Queen (1590-1596).

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Claribel
  • Clarabelle
  • Claribell
  • Claribelle

 

Nymphidia

Nymphidia is an Ancient Greek name, the feminine form of Nymphidius, the genitive form of Nymphe or Nympha meaning “bride, bridal, young woman”. Nymphidia later took on the meaning for a beautiful young woman or later to a woman with divine origin. It was used by English poet Michael Drayon (1563-1631) for his poem Nymphidia (The Court of Faery) published in 1627, who was also credited with coining thw word nymphet (meaning little nymph).

Nicknames: Nym, Nydia, Dia

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Nimphidia
  • Nympha (Ancient Greek)
  • Nymphe (Ancient Greek)

 

Male forms:

  • Nymphidius (Ancient Greek)
  • Nymphidios (Ancient Greek)
  • Nymphidanus

 

Juliet

Juliet is the English form of either Juliette, a French diminutive of Julie, or Giulietta, the Italian diminutive of Giulia. Both names are ultimately derived from Julia, the feminine form of Julius, an Ancient Roman name of uncertain meaning though it’s been linked to Greek ioulos (downy-bearded) or it could be related to Jupiter, the name of the Roman god derived from Indo-European *Dyeu-Pater meaning “Zeus father”, Zeus meaning “shine” or “sky”.

Shakespeare used the name twice, the first for Romeo and Juliet (1591-1595) and Measure for Measure (1603-1604).

Origin: Latin, Indo-European

Variants:

  • Juliette (French, English)
  • Julietta (English, Polish)
  • Juliett (English)
  • Giulietta (Italian)
  • Giulia (Italian)
  • Julia (English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Roman)
  • Juliana (English, Dutch, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman)
  • Julianne (English)
  • Julie (French, Danish, Norwegian, Czech, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, English)
  • Júlia (Portuguese, Catalan, Hungarian, Slovak)
  • Yuliya (Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian)
  • Ghjulia (Corsican)
  • Julija (Croatian, Slovene, Lithuanian)
  • Julitta
  • Juli (Hungarian)
  • Iúile (Irish)
  • Jūlija (Latvian)
  • Julita (Polish)
  • Iulia (Ancient Roman, Romanian)
  • Yulia (Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Yuliana (Russian, Bulgarian, Indonesian)
  • Uliana (Russian)
  • Julienne (French)
  • Juliane (French, German)

 

Male forms:

  • Julius (Ancient Roman, English, German)
  • Julian (English, Polish, German)
  • Julyan (English)
  • Jolyan (English)
  • Iulius (Ancient Roman)
  • Iulian (Romanian)
  • Jules (French)
  • Giulio (Italian)
  • Giuliano (Italian)
  • Julien (French)
  • Julián (Spanish)
  • Julio (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Yuliy (Russian)
  • Juliusz (Polish)
  • Yulian (Russian, Bulgarian)

 

Olivia

Olivia is a female given name first used by Shakespeare for a character in his play Twelfth Night (1602). He could have based it from Latin Oliva meaning “olive” or he could have based as a feminine form of Oliver, which either derives from Germanic name Alfher from Old Norse Alvar meaning “elf warrior” or “elf army”; or it could be from Old Norse Olaf meaning “ancestor’s descendant”.

Origin: Latin, Old Norse

Variants:

  • Olyvia (English)
  • Alivia (English)
  • Olivie (French, Czech)
  • Olívia (Hungarian, Portuguese, Slovak)
  • Oliwia (Polish)
  • Ólivía (Icelandic)
  • Oliva (Latin)

 

Male forms:

  • Oliver