Ariel

Ariel is a Hebrew given name meaning "lion of god", a compound of Ari (lion) and el (God). It was primarily used as a male name up until the 1980s when it became popular for girls. Ariel is the name of a spirit in the Shakespeare's The Tempest (1610-1611). Ariel is also a Hebrew surname derived from the given name. Nicknames: Arik … Continue reading Ariel

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Orinthia

Orinthia may have been based on Ancient Greek orī́nō meaning "to excite, to stir, to agitate" or it may have been an elaborated form of Orinda, which may have been based on Latin orior meaning "to rise" from a PIE root. It may also have been based on Old Irish ór (gold) which comes from Latin aurum (gold) derived from a Proto-Indo-European root word *h₂ews- (to … Continue reading Orinthia

Vanessa

Vanessa is a famous name created by the Anglo-Irish author Jonathan Swift for his poem Cadenus and Vanessa (1713). He created it by taking the first three letters of his lover’s surname (Esther Vanhomrigh) and adding the pet form Essa. Vanhomrigh is a Dutch surname and van means “from”, referring to a habitational surname, while Esther either means … Continue reading Vanessa

Artigal

Artigal is a very unusual name. From what I could find, it could be a variant spelling of Artegal, itself an anglicized form of Ardghal, an Irish male name meaning "high valor" from Old Irish ard (high) from Proto-Celtic *ardwos derived from Proto-Indo-European *h₂erHdʰ- (high; to grow); and gal (valor, fury) via Proto-Celtic *galā (might, ability). Artegal (Arthegall) is also the name of a knight … Continue reading Artigal

Karmina

Karmina is a variant spelling of Carmina, the Italian and Spanish diminutive of Carmen which has two sources: the first is that it's the Spanish form of Carmel meaning "garden, vineyard" from Hebrew karmel. Carmina is also the plural form of Latin carmen meaning "song, poem" derived from Proto-Indo-European *keh₂n- (to sing). Carmina refers to a collection of poems (also known as the … Continue reading Karmina

Malduc

Malduc is the name of a powerful sorcerer in the Arthurian legends who helped Arthur get Guinevere back after she was kidnapped. The meaning of the name is uncertain though it may be linked to Máel Máedóc meaning "disciple of Máedóc", Máedóc perhaps being a diminutive of Aodh meaning "my little Aodh", the latter derived from Áed meaning "fire" while Máel means "servant, devout follower" when combined with a … Continue reading Malduc

Morien

Morien is an old Welsh name, a cognate of Muirgen, made up from Celtic elements *mori- (sea) and *geno- (born). In the Arthurian legends, Morien is the son of Agrovale, one of the knights of the Round Table. Traveling in Moorish lands, he meets a beautiful princess whom he slept with and had a son, Morien, though Agrovale leaves before … Continue reading Morien

Amaryllis

Amaryllis comes from Ancient Greek amarysso meaning "to sparkle" as well as the name of a flower, which symbolizes pride, determination, and radiant beauty in the language of flowers. The name is used in Virgil's Eclogues and Theocritus's Idylls. Origin: Ancient Greek Variants: Amarilis (Spanish)  

Celia

Celia is the English form of Caelia, the feminine form of Caelius, an Ancient Roman family name meaning "heaven, sky" from Latin caelum from a Proto-Indo-European root word of uncertain meaning. It was used by Shakespeare for a character in his play As You Like It (1623). Celia could also be used as a short form of Cecelia, a variant spelling of Cecilia derived … Continue reading Celia