Horatio

Horatio is the English form of Horatius, an Ancient Roman family name that could possibly be derived from Latin hora meaning "hour, time, season", although it's more likely that the name is Etruscan in origin and its real meaning lost. Horatio is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's play Hamlet, as well as also being a … Continue reading Horatio

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Celia

Celia is the English form of Caelia, the feminine form of Caelius, an Ancient Roman family name meaning "heaven, sky" from Latin caelum from a Proto-Indo-European root word of uncertain meaning. It was used by Shakespeare for a character in his play As You Like It (1623). Celia could also be used as a short form of Cecelia, a variant spelling of Cecilia derived … Continue reading Celia

Regan

Regan has two sources: the first is that it's a variant spelling of Reagan, an anglicized form of Irish surname Ó Ríagáin meaning "descendant of Riagán", the latter a given name of uncertain meaning though it may mean "impulsive, furious" from Irish ríodhgach. It may also mean "little king" from Irish rí (king) which comes from Proto-Indo-European *h₃rḗǵs (king, ruler), combined with … Continue reading Regan

Anne

Anne is the French feminine form of Anna, the Greek form of Hebrew Channah meaning "favor" or "grace". Anne is also a Frisian masculine name derived from Germanic element arn meaning "eagle", and has been used as a male name in France, the Netherlands, and even Scotland. In Shakespeare's play The Merry Wives of Windsor (1602) one of … Continue reading Anne

Duncan

Duncan is the anglicized form of Gaelic Donnchadh which means "brown battle" from Gaelic donn which comes from Proto-Celtic *dusnos (brown) via Proto-Indo-European *dunnos- (dark), and cath (battle) also derived from a Proto-Indo-European root word. Another possible meaning I've seen for the name is "brown chieftain". Duncan is also a surname derived from the given name. In Shakespeare's Macbeth (1606), Duncan is the king of … Continue reading Duncan

Andromache

Andromache (pr. an-dro-ma-kee) is the name of the wife of the Trojan hero Hector, making her a princess of Troy. The name comes from Ancient Greek aner (man) and mache (battle) either meaning "battle of man", "man's battle", or "fight like a man". When Troy was sacked, their son Astyanax was thrown from the city walls and she as … Continue reading Andromache

Edmund

Edmund is an English male name made up from Old English elements ead (wealth, fortune, riches) and mund (protection) meaning "rich protection" or "wealthy protector". Ead comes from Proto-Germanic *audaz (wealth, riches) and mund also comes from Proto-Germanic *mundō (hand; protection, security) derived from Proto-Indo-European *man- (hand; man, human being). Edmund is the name of an antagonist in Shakespeare's King Lear (1603-1606). Origin: Proto-Germanic, Proto-Indo-European   Variants: Eadmund (Anglo-Saxon) Edmond (French) … Continue reading Edmund

Calpurnia

Calpurnia is an Ancient Roman name, the feminine form of Calpurnius meaning "chalice, cup". It comes from Latin calpar, used to refer to a vessel for liquids such as wine, which derives from Ancient Greek kalpís (jug, urn). Calpurnia was the third wife of Julius Caesar who apparently had a premonition of her husband's death and features in Shakespeare's play Julius Caesar … Continue reading Calpurnia

Hippolyta

Hippolyta is an Ancient Greek name, the Latinized form of Hippolyte, the feminine form of Hippolytos meaning "freer of horses" from Ancient Greek elements hippos (horse) and lytos (loosen, undone). In Greek mythology, Hippolyta was an Amazonian queen who possessed a magic girdle which was given to her by her father, the god Ares. It was one of the labors of Hercules … Continue reading Hippolyta

Henry

Henry comes from Germanic given name Heimirich meaning "home ruler" from Germanic elements heim (home) and ric (power, rule). It's also a surname derived form the given name. Shakespeare wrote several historical plays about King Henry IV, Henry V, and Henry VI of England. Origin: Ancient Germanic Variants: Heimirich (Ancient Germanic) Heinrich (Ancient Germanic, German) Henricus (Dutch, Latinized Ancient Germanic) Henrik … Continue reading Henry