Female, Hebrew, J names, Literature, Names from Shakespeare's plays, Virtues/Attributes

Jessica

Jessica first appeared as a name in William Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice (1596) likely basing it on an existing name, Iscah (which would have been known as Jescha in his time) derived from Hebrew Yiskah meaning "to behold", "foresight" or "one who looks forth". Nicknames: Jess, Jessie/Jessy/Jessi/Jessye Origin: Hebrew Variants: Jessika (German, English) Gessica (Italian) Yessica… Continue reading Jessica

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Apple/Apple tree, Elements, Female, Japanese, M names, Mythology, Names from Shakespeare's plays, Nature, Physical Attributes, Proto-Indo-European, Roman mythology, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes, Water, Word names

Marina

Marina is the feminine form of Marinus, an Ancient Roman name meaning "of the sea" or "belonging to the sea", derived from a PIE root word *móri- (sea, ocean; body of water), though Marinus could also be derived from Marius which could be derived from Latin mas meaning “male” or Latin mare meaning “sea”. It could also be derived from Mars, the… Continue reading Marina

Hebrew, I names, Male, Names from Shakespeare's plays, Virtues/Attributes

Iago

Iago is the Welsh and Galician form of Jacob or James meaning "holder of the heel" or "supplanter" from Hebrew Ya'aqov. It's the name of the villain in Shakespeare's Othello (1603). In Welsh it's pronounced ya-go in Welsh and ee-aw-go in Spanish. Origin: Hebrew Variants: Jago (Cornish) Yago (Spanish)  

Ancient Greek, Color, Emotion/Feelings, Female, Male, Names from Shakespeare's plays, Nature, Proto-Indo-European, R names, Red/Crimson, Sorrow, Surname names, Unisex, Word names

Rue

Rue is the name of a species of plants that were used as medicinal herbs and in cooking. The name comes from Latin rūta derived from Ancient Greek rhutḗ, derived from an uncertain etymology though it may be derived from a Peloponnesian word. Rue is also an English word meaning "to regret, feel remorse or sorrow for". It… Continue reading Rue

C names, Female, Greek mythology, Kin/Family, Mythology, Names from Shakespeare's plays, Proto-Indo-European, Virtues/Attributes

Cleopatra

Cleopatra is most famously connected to the last queen of Egypt, the lover of Mark Antony who killed herself rather than surrendering to Octavian's forces. There were actually several princesses with that name, which is why she's Cleopatra VII, as well as also being the name of several minor figures in Greek mythology, including the daughter of… Continue reading Cleopatra

B names, Color, Female, Names from Shakespeare's plays, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes, White, Word names

Bianca

Bianca is an Italian female name, a cogante of Blanche meaning "white" from Latin blancus (white) from Proto-Germanic *blankaz (white, gleaming, shining, bright) which derives from PIE *bʰleyǵ- (to shine). Bianca is also an Italian surname as well as having been used twice by Shakespeare for his plays Taming of the Shrew (1593) and Othello (1603). Origin: Proto-Ido-European Variants: Blanche (French, English) Blanch (English) Blanka… Continue reading Bianca

Etruscan, Literature, M names, Male, Mythology, Names from Shakespeare's plays, Proto-Indo-European, Roman mythology, Virtues/Attributes

Mercutio

Mercutio was the name of a character in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet (1597), portrayed as the close friend of Romeo who was neither Montague nor Capulet. He is portrayed as being given to sudden outbursts and a moody temperament, hence his name, related to the word mercurial, referring to someone with a changeable, fickle, or spirited nature. It derives from Mercury,… Continue reading Mercutio

L names, Male, Names from Shakespeare's plays, Physical Attributes, Proto-Indo-European, Virtues/Attributes

Lysander

Lysander is the Latinized form of Ancient Greek Lysandros meaning "releasing man" or "freeing man", from Ancient Greek elements lysis (releasing, loosening, freeing) from lū́ō (to loose, loosen, to untie) from PIE *lewH- (to loosen, divide, cut apart); and andros (man), a genitive form of aner (man) which derives from PIE *h₂nḗr (man; power, force, vital energy). Lysander is the name of a character in Shakespeare's play A Midsummer Night's… Continue reading Lysander

Animals, B names, Birds, Male, Names from Shakespeare's plays, Proto-Indo-European, Raven, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes

Bertram

Bertram is a Germanic and English male name meaning "bright raven", made up from Germanic elements beraht (bright) from Proto-Germanic *berhtaz (bright, shining) via PIE *bhereg- (to shine); and hramn (raven) from Proto-Germanic *hrabnaz (raven) from PIE *ḱorh₂-, which is imitative of the harsh sounds. Bertram is also a surname derived from the given name. Bertram was also used by Shakespeare in his play All's Well That Ends Well… Continue reading Bertram

Ancient Greek, Animals, Birds, Dove, Irish, M names, Male, Names from Shakespeare's plays, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes

Malcolm

Malcolm is a male name, the anglicized form of Scottish Máel Coluim meaning "servant of St. Columba", referring to someone who followed Irish abbot and missionary St. Columba who spread Christianity into Scotland. Máel means “servant, devout follower” when combined with a name element (as a word it also means “bald, shaved, tonsured”) combined with given name Coluim, the Gaelic… Continue reading Malcolm

A names, Animals, Female, Hebrew, Lion, Male, Names from Shakespeare's plays, Surname names, Unisex, Virtues/Attributes

Ariel

Ariel is a Hebrew given name meaning "lion of god", a compound of Ari (lion) and el (God). It was primarily used as a male name up until the 1980s when it became popular for girls. Ariel is the name of a spirit in the Shakespeare's The Tempest (1610-1611). Ariel is also a Hebrew surname derived from the given name. Nicknames: Arik… Continue reading Ariel

Etruscan, H names, Latin, Male, Names from Shakespeare's plays, Seasons, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes

Horatio

Horatio is the English form of Horatius, an Ancient Roman family name that could possibly be derived from Latin hora meaning "hour, time, season", although it's more likely that the name is Etruscan in origin and its real meaning lost. Horatio is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's play Hamlet, as well as also being a… Continue reading Horatio

C names, Female, Names from Shakespeare's plays, Physical Attributes, Proto-Indo-European, Sky/Heavens, Virtues/Attributes

Celia

Celia is the English form of Caelia, the feminine form of Caelius, an Ancient Roman family name meaning "heaven, sky" from Latin caelum from a Proto-Indo-European root word of uncertain meaning. It was used by Shakespeare for a character in his play As You Like It (1623). Celia could also be used as a short form of Cecelia, a variant spelling of Cecilia derived… Continue reading Celia

Celtic, Female, Irish, Male, Names from Shakespeare's plays, Proto-Indo-European, R names, Surname names, Unisex, Virtues/Attributes

Regan

Regan has two sources: the first is that it's a variant spelling of Reagan, an anglicized form of Irish surname Ó Ríagáin meaning "descendant of Riagán", the latter a given name of uncertain meaning though it may mean "impulsive, furious" from Irish ríodhgach. It may also mean "little king" from Irish rí (king) which comes from Proto-Indo-European *h₃rḗǵs (king, ruler), combined with… Continue reading Regan

A names, Animals, Birds, Eagle, Female, German/Germanic, Hebrew, Male, Names from Shakespeare's plays, Unisex, Virtues/Attributes

Anne

Anne is the French feminine form of Anna, the Greek form of Hebrew Channah meaning "favor" or "grace". Anne is also a Frisian masculine name derived from Germanic element arn meaning "eagle", and has been used as a male name in France, the Netherlands, and even Scotland. In Shakespeare's play The Merry Wives of Windsor (1602) one of… Continue reading Anne

Battle/War, Brown, Color, D names, Male, Names from Shakespeare's plays, Proto-Indo-European, Surname names, Virtues/Attributes

Duncan

Duncan is the anglicized form of Gaelic Donnchadh which means "brown battle" from Gaelic donn which comes from Proto-Celtic *dusnos (brown) via Proto-Indo-European *dunnos- (dark), and cath (battle) also derived from a Proto-Indo-European root word. Another possible meaning I've seen for the name is "brown chieftain". Duncan is also a surname derived from the given name. In Shakespeare's Macbeth (1606), Duncan is the king of… Continue reading Duncan

A names, Ancient Greek, Battle/War, Female, Greek, Greek mythology, Mythology, Names from Shakespeare's plays, Physical Attributes, Virtues/Attributes

Andromache

Andromache (pr. an-dro-ma-kee) is the name of the wife of the Trojan hero Hector, making her a princess of Troy. The name comes from Ancient Greek aner (man) and mache (battle) either meaning "battle of man", "man's battle", or "fight like a man". When Troy was sacked, their son Astyanax was thrown from the city walls and she as… Continue reading Andromache

E names, Male, Names from Shakespeare's plays, Physical Attributes, Proto-Germanic, Proto-Indo-European, Virtues/Attributes

Edmund

Edmund is an English male name made up from Old English elements ead (wealth, fortune, riches) and mund (protection) meaning "rich protection" or "wealthy protector". Ead comes from Proto-Germanic *audaz (wealth, riches) and mund also comes from Proto-Germanic *mundō (hand; protection, security) derived from Proto-Indo-European *man- (hand; man, human being). Edmund is the name of an antagonist in Shakespeare's King Lear (1603-1606). Origin: Proto-Germanic, Proto-Indo-European   Variants: Eadmund (Anglo-Saxon) Edmond (French)… Continue reading Edmund

Ancient Greek, C names, Female, Names from Shakespeare's plays

Calpurnia

Calpurnia is an Ancient Roman name, the feminine form of Calpurnius meaning "chalice, cup". It comes from Latin calpar, used to refer to a vessel for liquids such as wine, which derives from Ancient Greek kalpís (jug, urn). Calpurnia was the third wife of Julius Caesar who apparently had a premonition of her husband's death and features in Shakespeare's play Julius Caesar… Continue reading Calpurnia

Ancient Greek, Animals, Female, Greek, Greek mythology, H names, Horses/Stallions, Mythology, Names from Shakespeare's plays, Virtues/Attributes

Hippolyta

Hippolyta is an Ancient Greek name, the Latinized form of Hippolyte, the feminine form of Hippolytos meaning "freer of horses" from Ancient Greek elements hippos (horse) and lytos (loosen, undone). In Greek mythology, Hippolyta was an Amazonian queen who possessed a magic girdle which was given to her by her father, the god Ares. It was one of the labors of Hercules… Continue reading Hippolyta