Yotaka

Yotaka is a Japanese male name with various meanings depending on the kanji used: "buzzard" (鵟); "night + hawk" (夜鷹); though the literal meaning is "nighthawk", referring to the bird which belongs to the nightjar family, it also has a secondary meaning of streetwalker/prostitute. Origin: Japanese

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Amaya

Amaya is a Basque and Spanish female name, a variant spelling of Amaia meaning "the end" in Basque, as well as a surname derived from a place name. It's also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used, such as: "rain + night; evening" (雨夜), essentially meaning "rainy night" or "rainy evening"; "rain … Continue reading Amaya

Lilith

Lilith comes from Akkadian lilitu or lilatu meaning "night", which seems to have been used to refer to a type of female demon in Assyrian and Sumerian myth known as lilitu or lili (a male demon would be lilu) who sedeuce and sleep with humans. According to Jewish tradition, Lilith is the first woman ever created, Adam's first wife, before she was thrown … Continue reading Lilith

Kazuya

Kazuya is a Japanese male name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used.  It's made up of Japanese elements kazu meaning 一 "one", 和 "harmony, peace", 冬 "winter"; 万 "ten thousand"; 三 "three"; and ya meaning 八 "eight"; 矢 "arrow"; 也 "to be, also, too"; 哉 (a final exclamatory particle that has no particular meaning); 優 "excellent, outstanding, kind, tenderness"; 弥 "extensive, full, complete"; 夜 "night"; though there are likely other meanings as well. Kazu can also … Continue reading Kazuya

Maya, Maia

Maya is the name of the Mayan civilization and its people, a Mesoamerican civilization that stretched out in southern Mexico, Belize, Guatemela, El Salvador, and Honduras, though it's of unknown meaning.  Maya is also an Indian girl's name meaning "illusion" or "magic" in Sanskrit, featuring as a concept in Hinduism and Buddhism. In Hindu mythology, … Continue reading Maya, Maia

Twyla

Twyla is a variant spelling of Twila, a name of uncertain etymology though it could perhaps be based on the English word twilight, referring to the period before sunrise and after sunset during which a soft light is seen in the sky. The word comes from Old English twi (double, half) and light (light) essentially meaning "second light" or "half light". Another possible … Continue reading Twyla