Celina

Celina seems to be a variant spelling of Selena at first glance, the name of the Greek goddess of the moon, which fittingly means “moon”; though it may also be a short form of Marcelina (or any name ending in celina), the Polish feminine form of Marcellus, an ancient Roman cognomen which originated as a diminutive of Marcus, a Roman praenomen which…

Tanaquil

Tanaquil is an Etruscan female name, a Latinized form of Thanchvil which apparently means “gift of Thana”, Thana apparently being the name of an Etruscan goddess. However, it’s possible that the name may be related to Thalna, a divine figure in Etruscan mythology, presented as either female or male, or androgynous. Thalna may mean “bloom, growth” but I can’t attest…

Marius

Marius comes from a Roman family name which can either be used as a masculine form of Maria (the Latin form of Hebrew name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian…

Sabeen

Sabeen is an Arabic female name possibly meaning “follower of another religion”. Sabeen is also similar to the name Sabine and could even be a variant spelling of the name. Sabine is the French, German, and Danish form of Sabina, the feminine form of Ancient Roman cognomen Sabinus meaning “Sabine”, referring to a member of an ancient tribe in Italy that was eventually assimilated…

Martine

Martine is the French, Dutch, and Norwegian feminine form of Martin which ultimately derives from the name of the Roman war of god, Mars, who played a prominent role in Roman worship, including being linked to agricultural functions. The etymology behind the name is uncertain though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” or from Latin marcus meaning “large…

Tarquin

Tarquin is the English form of Latin Tarquinius and was the name of two of the seven legendary kings of Rome. Apparently the first Tarquinius (Lucius Tarquinius Priscus aka Tarquin the Elder) came to Rome from Etruria, an ancient region in Central Italy which was home to the Etruscans. Lucius Tarquinius Superbus (aka Tarquin the Proud) was the son…

Marcus

Marcus is a Latin praenomen (given name) of uncertain etymology though it’s likely that it derives from Mars, the Roman god of war and agriculture. The name itself is of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” or from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”. However, it’s also possible that Mars is related to a…

Minerva

Minerva is the name of the Roman goddess of wisdom and war (specifically strategic war), the arts, and crafts, and is the Roman counterpart of the Greek goddess Athena- the owl is often depicted as a sacred animal to both of them. The origin of the name is uncertain. It could possibly be derived from Latin mens…

Sabienne

Sabienne is a female given name which could possibly be a variation of Sabina, the feminine form of Ancient Roman cognomen Sabinus meaning “Sabine”, referring to a member of an ancient tribe in Italy that was eventually assimilated into the Roman Empire. From what I could find, it supposedly means “of one’s own” derived from a PIE root word,…

Saturday

Saturday comes from Old English Sæterndæg meaning “Saturn’s day”, Saturn being the Roman god of agriculture and fertility in Roman mythology. The name seems to be derived from Latin satus (sowing, planting) which ultimately derives from PIE root word *seh₁- (to sow, to plant), though it’s also possible that the name comes from Etruscan Satre, the name of an Etruscan god, his name…