Calista

Calista could be the variant form of Callisto, an Ancient Greek female name meaning "most beautiful" derived from Ancient Greek kalós (beauty, beautiful, good) which comes from a Proto-Indo-European source kal-wo-s, a form of *kal- (beautiful). In Greek mythology Callisto was a nymph and a follower of the goddess Artemis who was seduced by Zeus and ended up bearing him a son, Arcas. Callisto was … Continue reading Calista

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Helia

Helia is the feminine form of Helios which means "sun" in Ancient Greek. It comes from Proto-Hellenic *hāwélios (sun) from PIE *sóh₂wl̥ (sun). In Greek mythology, Helia is the name of one of the Heliades (children of the sun), the daughters of Helios by Clymene, a sea nymph. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Male forms: Helios (Ancient Greek) Helius (Latinized Ancient Greek) Elio (Italian)  

Melitta

Melitta is the Ancient Attic Greek form of Melissa which comes from Ancient Greek meaning “bee” or “honeybee” from PIE *mélit (honey) and *leyǵʰ- (to lick). In Greek mythology, Melissa was a nymph who took care of a young Zeus when he was hidden from his father Cronus (though there are various versions of the myth naming other nymphs who looked after him) … Continue reading Melitta

Calypso

Calypso is the name of a nymph in Greek mythology who was the lover of Odysseus when he ended up shipwrecked on her island Ogygia for seven years though some sources differ on the number of years, as well as whether they had children together. Either way, she refused to let him leave until Zeus sent Hermes to her with instructions to … Continue reading Calypso

Denzil

Denzil has several possible meanings but nothing concrete, and they may not even be accurate. It’s from a surname denoting someone who came from a place called Denzell in Cornwall. I’ve seen it listed as meaning “fort”, “fertile highland” or “high stronghold”. I’ve also seen it listed as being a pet form of German name Denz, a short … Continue reading Denzil

Laurel

Laurel is the name of a tree derived from Latin laurus meaning "laurel". It derives from Ancient Greek daphne (laurel, bay), likely coming from a much older source; the letters changed from d- to l- due to a change in dialect. Laurel is also a surname, likely derived as a place name for someone who lived near a laurel tree. The laurel tree, in … Continue reading Laurel

Grace

Grace comes from Latin gratia meaning "favor, kindness" and usually referring to qualities of elegance, pleasantness, charm, kindness, courteousness, and attractiveness. It derives from grātus (pleasing, acceptable, agreeable) via PIE *gʷerH- (to favor, approve; praise). I've also seen it listed as having originally been associated with Germanic element gris meaning "gray" though it was later eclipsed with the Latin … Continue reading Grace

Elana

Elana is a female given name with several possible origins: it could be a variant spelling of Ilana, which is the feminine form of Ilan, a Hebrew male name meaning "tree", though it could also be a feminine form of Elon, another Hebrew male name meaning "tree, oak tree"; Elana could also be a variant form of Helena, … Continue reading Elana

Nausicaa

Nausicaa is an Ancient Greek female name meaning "burner of ships" from Ancient Greek naûs (ship) deriving from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂us (boat) and kaío (to burn, kindle), which may also be derived from a PIE source though the exact origin of the word is unknown. Nausicaa features in Homer's Odyssey as a princess of Phaeacia who helps a shipwrecked Odysseus by directing him … Continue reading Nausicaa

Telemachus

Telemachus is an Ancient Greek male name possibly meaning "far away from battle" or "fighting from afar", maybe in reference to an archer. It's made up from Ancient Greek têle (far away, far off) via Proto-Indo-European *kʷel- (to turn, far); and mákhē (battle, combat) of uncertain origin, perhaps pre-Greek in origin. Telemachus is the son of Odysseus and Penelope who was only a baby when … Continue reading Telemachus