Makenna

Makenna is a variant of McKenna, an anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cionaodha meaning "son of Cionaodh", Cionaodh meaning "beloved of Aodh" composed of Irish cion (love, affection; regard) and Aodh (also spelled Áed, the name of the Celtic god of fire) meaning "fire". It could also be a variant of Cináed meaning "born of fire", also anglicized as Kenneth.  Nicknames: Kenna Origin: Proto-Indo-European   …

Lugh

Lugh is the name of a hero in Irish mythology, the son of Cian and Eithne, though he's also been associated with Lugus, an early Celtic god associated with the god Mercury by the Romans. Lugh is portrayed as a skilled warrior and craftsman. The etymology behind the name is uncertain. It could be a variant of Lugus, which itself …

Fenella

Fenella is a female given name, the Scottish form of Fionnuala, made up from Irish elements finn (fair, white) and guala (shoulder) meaning “fair shoulder” or “fair-shouldered”. In Irish mythology, Fionnuala is the name of a figure in Irish mythology, the daughter of King Lir and the sister of Aodh, Fiachra, and Conn. She and her brothers were changed into swans by their stepmother Aoife, …

Kermit

Kermit is an English male name which seems to have originated as a variant of Kermode, a Manx surname which itself is the Manx form of Gaelic surname Mac Diarmata (anglicized as McDermott) meaning "son of Diarmaid", Diarmaid being an Irish name of uncertain meaning though possibly meaning "without envy", made up of negative prefix dí combined with Scottish Gaelic farmad …

Fiachra

Fiachra (pr. fee-akh-ra; Forvo) is the name of one of the children of Lir who, along with his brothers Aodh and Conn and sister Fionnuala, were turned into swans by their stepmother Aoife, a curse that lasted for 900 years before being broken. The name comes from Irish fiach meaning "raven" which derives from a Proto-Celtic root word. Origin: Proto-Celtic Variants: Fiacre (French) …

Lir

Lir is the Irish cognate of Llyr, the name of the Welsh god of the sea in Welsh mythology. The name means "sea" or "ocean". In Irish mythology, Lir is the Irish god of the sea and the father of Manannan mac Lir, also a sea deity. There's also an Irish legend called The Children of Lir, in …

Cian

Cian (pr. kee-an; Forvo) is the name of a hero in Irish mythology. It means "ancient; long, distant, far" derived from a Proto-Celtic word. In Irish mythology, Cian was a man who owned a magical cow that never ran out of milk. It was stolen from him by Balor and in an attempt to get her …

Boann

Boann is the name of a goddess in Irish mythology, goddess of the River Boyne. Her name means "white cow" from Irish bó (cow) and fhionn (fair, white). She had an affair with the Dagda, an important god in Irish mythology, despite being married to Elcmar (also known by Nuada), and she became pregnant by him. In order to hide their …

Nuada

Nuada (pr. noo-a-tha or noo-a-da; Forvo) is the name of a figure in Irish mythology, known as Nuada Airgetlám (Nuada of the Silver Arm), who was king of the Tuatha Dé Danann. He lost his arm in battle, which was later replaced by a silver one. It's possible that Nuada may have been related to Nodens, a Celtic god associated …

Emer

Emer is the name of the wife of Cúchulainn in Irish mythology (a legendary hero in Irish myth) said to possess the six gifts of womanhood: beauty, a gentle voice, sweet speech, needlework, wisdom, and chastity. Her name means "swift" from Irish eimh. Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Éimhear (Irish) Eimear (Irish) Eimhir (Scottish)  

Ennis

Ennis comes from an Irish surname with two possible meanings behind it. The first is that it derives from Irish inis meaning "island" via Proto-Celtic *enistī (island) derived from a PIE root word. The second is that it derives from Angus, an anglicized form of Aonghus, a Scottish Gaelic name meaning “either one strength” or “one choice”, made up from Old Irish óen …

Angus

Angus is an anglicized form of Aonghus, a Scottish Gaelic name meaning "either one strength" or "one choice", made up from Old Irish óen (one) via Proto-Celtic *oinos (one) deriving from a PIE root word; while the second element could either be derived from gus meaning “strength, vigor” via Proto-Celtic *gustu-; or from Proto-Celtic *gus (choose). Spelled Aengus, it becomes the name of the Irish …