Etain

Etain is the Anglicized form of Étaín, an Irish female name. It seems likely it derives from Old Irish ét meaning “jealousy, passion, zeal”. In Irish mythology, Étaín is the lover of Midir, the son of the Dagda, but she was turned into a water, a worm, and a butterfly (or a fly in some versions) by his jealous wife Fuamnach. Étaín has also been associated as being a sun and horse goddess.

It can be pronounced as e-tane or ay-teen (I prefer the former).

Origin: Irish

Variants:

  • Étaín (Irish)
  • Etaoin (Modern Irish)
  • Éadaoin (Modern Irish)
  • Édaín (Irish)
  • Eadan (Modern Irish)
  • Edana (Latin)
  • Aideen (English, Irish)

 

Aiden

Origin: Irish

Meaning: Aiden is a variant spelling of Aidan, which is the Anglicized form of Aodhán from Old Irish Áedán, a diminutive of Áed (or Aodh) with the diminutive suffix -an meaning “fire” or “fiery” so Aiden would mean “little fire” or “little fiery one”.

In Irish mythology Aodh (pronounced ae like hay) is one of the sons of Lir, the twin brother of Fionnuala, and brother of Conn and Fiachra (also twins) who were cursed to be swans for 900 years by their jealous stepmother.

Variants:

  • Aidan (Irish, Scottish, English)
  • Aden (English)
  • Aydan (English)
  • Ayden (English)
  • Aedan (English, Irish)
  • Edan (Irish, Scottish)
  • Áed (Ancient Irish)
  • Áedán (Ancient Irish)
  • Áedh (Ancient Irish)
  • Aodh (Irish, Scottish)
  • Aodhán (Irish, Scottish)
  • Aodhagán (Irish, Scottish)
  • Iagan (Scottish)