Connor

Connor is the anglicized form of Gaelic Conchobhar meaning "lover of hounds" from Old Irish con (dog, hound) which derives from Proto-Celtic *kū (dog; wolf) derived from PIE *ḱwṓ (dog); and cobar (desiring) also derived from a PIE root word. Connor is also a surname derived from the given name. In Irish myth, Conchobhar mac Nessa was a legendary king of Ulster who was responsible for … Continue reading Connor

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Morna

Morna is the anglicized form of Muirne, an Irish female name meaning "festive, high-spirited" though I've also seen it listed as meaning "joy, affection". In Irish mythology, Muirne was the mother of Fionn mac Cumhail. She loved a man, Cumhall, from another tribe but her father forbade her marriage and so Cumhall abducted her. He was later killed in battle but … Continue reading Morna

Aoife

Aoife (pr. ee-fa or ee-va) is an Irish female name meaning "beauty, radiant" from Irish aoibh (beauty, form; smile, pleasant expression). In Irish mythology, Aoife is the name of a warrior queen who bore the great hero Cú Chulainn a son named Connla, whom Cú Chulainn accidentally kills. Another Aoife is the second wife of King Lir and the stepmother of his kids, Aodh, … Continue reading Aoife

Neve

Neve is an anglicized form of Niamh, an Irish female name meaning "bright" or "radiant". In Irish myth, Niamh is the daughter of the sea god Manannán. She was the lover of Oisin, a great bard and poet and the son of  Fionn mac Cumhaill (Finn MacCool) who went with her to the land of Tír na nÓg (the Land of Youth). Time passed differently … Continue reading Neve

Carlyle

Carlyle is a variant spelling of Carlisle, a surname derived from the name of a city in Cumbria, England. The place was originally called Luguvalium, originally a Roman settlement named by the Ancient Romans meaning "strength of Luguvalos", made up of Lugus, a Celtic god associated with the Roman god Mercury; the origin of his name is unknown though it's … Continue reading Carlyle

Maeve

Maeve is the anglicized form of Gaelic Medb, the name of a warrior queen in Irish mythology. The name may be derived from Proto-Celtic *medu- (mead) and *medua- (intoxicating) so the name either means "mead woman" or "she who intoxicates". Origin: Proto-Celtic Variants: Maeva (English) Medb (Old Irish) Méabh (Irish) Meadhbh (Irish) Meave (Irish) Mave (Irish)  

Edna

Edna is a female name which comes from two different sources: the first is that it's a Hebrew name meaning "pleasure" or "delight"; it's also an anglicized form of Eithne, a Gaelic modern form of Old Irish Ethniu meaning "kernel, grain". In Irish mythology, Ethniu is the daughter of Balor, king of the Fomorians, a supernatural race sometimes depicted as … Continue reading Edna