Hilda

Hilda comes from Germanic element hild meaning “battle” as well as being a nickname for any name beginning with Hilde such as Hildebrand or Hildred. Hilda is also a cogante of Old Norse Hildr, the name of a Valkyrie in Norse mythology who had the power to revive the dead.

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Hildy (English)
  • Hylda (English)
  • Hilde (German, Dutch, Norwegian)
  • Hildur (Icelandic, Norwegian)
  • Hild (Old English)
  • Hildr (Ancient Scandinavian, Norse mythology)
  • Ilda (Italian)
  • Elda (Italian)

 

Frey

Frey is a variant of Freyr, the name of the Norse god of fertility and the weather, and the twin brother of Freya, as well as the husband of Gerd, a frost giantess, for whom he gave up a magical sword just to be with her though, without it, he will be killed during Ragnorak. His name comes from Proto-Germanic *frawjaz meaning “lord”.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Variants:

  • Freyr (Norse mythology, Icelandic)
  • Frej (Danish, Swedish, German)
  • Frei

 

Female forms:

  • Freya (Norse mythology, English)
  • Freyja (Norse mythology, Icelandic)
  • Freja (Danish, Swedish, German)
  • Frea (Norse mythology)
  • Frøya (Norwegian)

 

Odin

Odin is an Anglicized form of Old Norse Óðinn which comes from óðr meaning “inspiration, rage, frenzy”. It comes from Proto-Germanic *Wodanaz meaning “poetic fury” derived from *wodaz (rage, manic inspiration, mad, furious, possessed). In Norse mythology, Odin is the chief god of the Norse pantheon, a complex character who presided over war, art, wisdom, death, and magic, as well as poetry and seers. He has one eye and a large beard, and likes to wander, often in a relenetless pursuit of knowledge. Odin also presided over Valhalla and the valkyries, and is supposed to be killed by the wolf Fenrir at the end of the world known as Ragnarok.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Variants:

  • Oden (Swedish)
  • Óðinn (Icelandic, Old Norse)
  • Woden (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Wodan (Germanic)
  • Wotan (Germanic)

 

Gerda

Gerda is the feminine form of Dutch and German given name Gerd, a short form of Gerhard, the Scandinavian form of Gerard meaning “brave spear, hardy spear” from Germanic elements ger (spear) and hard (brave, hardy). Gerda is also the name of a Norse goddess and jotunn (giant) in Norse mythology, the wife of Freyr. The name comes from Old Norse garðr meaning “protection, fenced-in, to enclose”.

Origin: Germanic, Old Norse

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Variants:

  • Gerdina (Dutch)
  • Gerðr (Old Norse)
  • Gerth (Old Norse)

 

Male forms:

  • Gerd (German, Dutch)
  • Gerhard (German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Ancient Germanic, Scandinavian)
  • Gerard (English, Dutch, Catalan, Polish)

 

Sol

Sol is the Latin name for “sun”, and the name of the Roman god of the sun as well as being the Spanish and Potuguese word for “sun” deriving from Latin as well. It’s also a short form of Solomon, deriving from Hebrew shalom meaning “peace”. As a surname, it’s seems to have originated from Latin sol.

Spelled Sól, it’s the name of the Norse goddess of the sun; her name means “sun” in Old Norse.

Sol, also spelled as Sul and Seol, is also a Korean surname although I couldn’t manage to find an exact meaning behind it. Sol is also a Korean unisex given name meaning “pine tree” in Hangul; it can be used on its own or as part of a compound name.

Origin: Latin, Hebrew, Old Norse, Korean

Female variants:

  • Sola (f)
  • Sole (Italian, Spanish)

 

솔 (Hangul)– Sol

 

Ingram

Ingram is an English surname derived from Norman French Enguerrand which is the Medieval French form of Engilram, a Germanic name. The second part of the name comes from Germanic hramn (raven) though the first part of the name is a little trickier. It could be from Angil, the name of a Germanic tribe possibly meaning “angel”, though it could also be derived from Proto-Germanic *anguz possibly meaning “narrow, tight”.

Another possible origin for the first element is that it comes from Ing, a Germanic name possibly meaning “ancestor” from Proto-Germanic *Ingwaz; Ing is an Old Norse cognate of Yngvi, the name of an Old Norse fertility god, possibly an alternate name for Freyr, the Norse god of fertility, prosperity, sunshine, and rain.

Origin: Ancient Germanic

 

Thurstan

Thurstan comes from an English surname derived from Norse given name Torsten, from Old Norse Þórsteinn meaning “Thor’s stone”, Thor being the Norse god of thunder, strength, war, and storms . His name means “thunder”.

Origin: Old Norse

Variants:

  • Thorstein (Norwegian)
  • Torstein (Norwegian)
  • Torsten (Swedish, Danish, German)
  • Thorsten (Danish, Swedish, German)
  • Torsti (Finnish)
  • Turstin (Medieval English)
  • Þórsteinn (Ancient Scandinavian)

 

Ran

Ran is a Japanese feminine name meaning “orchid” (蘭) though there could be other meanings depending on the kanji used.

Ran is also a Chinese surname (冉) which could mean “tender” or “weak”.

Rán (pronounced rawn) is also the name of a goddess of the sea in Norse mythology who captures sailors in her net and drowns them. She is married to Ægir, a giant, and has nine daughters with him. Her name means “robber” or “robbery”.

Ran is also the past tense of run.

Origin: Japanese, Chinese, Norse

Variants:

  • Rán (Norse)