Corin

Corin is the French masculine form of Quirinus, a Latin name meaning “spear” or “lance” from Sabine quiris. In Roman mythology, Quirinus was a Sabine god who was later absorbed into the Roman pantheon, as well as being an epithet of Janus, the Roman god of beginnings, doorways, and endings. Corin could also be a variant form of Corinne, which is the French form of Greek Corinna meaning “maiden”. Corin could also be related to Cures, the name of an ancient Sabine town, or perhaps from Latin curia meaning “court”. It could also be derived from Cyrene (originally pronounced ky-ree-nee), the name of an ancient town in Libya named after a nymph beloved by the Greek god Apollo; her name could be derived from Greek kuros meaning “supreme power”.

Origin: Sabine, Greek

Variants:

  • Coren

 

Roma

Roma is the Latin name for the city of Rome, a name of uncertain etymology though the name’s origins have often been linked to its founder, Romulus, meaning “of Rome”. However, it’s likely that Romulus may have derived his name from the city and other theories regarding Rome’s meaning are: it might be from Greek rhōmē meaning “strength” or “might”; rheo or Latin ruo meaning “flow”; or from Etruscan ruma from the root word for “teat”, either in reference to the wolf that took in and suckled the infants Romulus and Remus in Roman mythology, or so named for the shape of the Palatine and Aventine hills.

Roma is also the Russian diminutive of Roman which comes from Latin Romanus meaning “Roman”, referring to a citizen of Rome, as well as also used to refer to the Roman goddess or personification of the ancient city of Rome in Roman mythology.

Origin: Uncertain, possibly Greek or Etruscan

Variants:

  • Roman (Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German)
  • Romanus (Latin)
  • Romanos (Latin, Greek)
  • Romain (French)
  • Romano (Italian)
  • Romeo (Italian)
  • Romolo (Italian form of Romulus)
  • Romaeus (Latin form of Romeo)
  • Romà (Catalan)
  • Román (Hungarian, Spanish)
  • Romão (Portuguese)

 

Female forms:

  • Romana (Italian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Late Roman)
  • Romola (Italian feminine form of Romulus)
  • Romaine (French, English)
  • Romane (French)
  • Romayne (English)
  • Romána (Hungarian)

 

Marko

Marko is the Slavic cognate of Mark, the English form of Marcus which seems to be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” though it might also be from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”.

However, it’s possible that Mars is related to a much older source, perhaps from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture), his name of unknown meaning. Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavors, a cognate of Oscan Mamers, which could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”.

Mars could also be derived from the same Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”, which would make sense since Mars is the god of war.

Marko is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Markos (Ancient Greek)
  • Marcus (Ancient Roman, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Markus (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Mark (English, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Marc (French, Catalan, Welsh)
  • Markku (Finnish)
  • Margh (Cornish)
  • Marek (Czech, Polish, Slovak)
  • Marco (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch)
  • Maleko (Hawaiian)
  • Márk (Hungarian)
  • Marcas (Irish, Scottish)
  • Markuss (Latvian)
  • Mars

 

Marcel

Marcel comes from Marcellus, a Roman family name that was originally a diminutive of given name Marcus which seems to be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” though it might also be from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”.

However, it’s possible that Mars is related to a much older source, perhaps from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture), his name of unknown meaning. Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavors, a cognate of Oscan Mamers, which could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”.

Mars could also be derived from the same Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”, which would make sense since Mars is the god of war.

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Marcellus (Ancient Roman, German, Dutch)
  • Marceli (Polish)
  • Marcell (Hungarian, German)
  • Marzell (German)
  • Martzel (Basque)
  • Marcello (Italian)
  • Marcelo (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Marcellin (French)

 

Female forms:

  • Marcellina (Ancient Roman)
  • Marcella (Ancient Roman, German, Italian)
  • Marceline (French)
  • Marcelline (French)
  • Marcelle (French)
  • Marcellette (French)
  • Marcelyn (English)
  • Marcelina (Polish)
  • Marcela (Spanish, Polish, Romanian, Czech)
  • Marsaili (Scottish)

 

Sol

Sol is the Latin name for “sun”, and the name of the Roman god of the sun as well as being the Spanish and Potuguese word for “sun” deriving from Latin as well. It’s also a short form of Solomon, deriving from Hebrew shalom meaning “peace”. As a surname, it’s seems to have originated from Latin sol.

Spelled Sól, it’s the name of the Norse goddess of the sun; her name means “sun” in Old Norse.

Sol, also spelled as Sul and Seol, is also a Korean surname although I couldn’t manage to find an exact meaning behind it. Sol is also a Korean unisex given name meaning “pine tree” in Hangul; it can be used on its own or as part of a compound name.

Origin: Latin, Hebrew, Old Norse, Korean

Female variants:

  • Sola (f)
  • Sole (Italian, Spanish)

 

솔 (Hangul)– Sol

 

Luna

Luna is the name of the Roman goddess of the moon, the sister of Aurora (goddess of the dawn) and Sol (god of the sun), and the Roman counterpart of Selene. Her name moons “moon” in Latin. Luna is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin

Variants:

  • Lune (French, Dutch)
  • Lunette (French)
  • Lunula (Latin)

 

Male forms

  • Luno (Spanish, Italian)
  • Lune (French, Dutch)

 

May

May is the fifth month of the year in English. The name comes from Maiathe name of a Roman goddess of spring, derived from Latin maius meaning “great”. It’s also another name for the hawthorn flower.

May is also a surname though it comes from a different source, likely from Old English may meaning “male relative”, “young lad” and “maiden”. It could also have been derived from a pet form of given name Matthew meaning “gift of Yahweh”.

Origin: Latin, Old English

 

Variants:

  • Maye
  • Maia

 

Maya, Maia

Maya is the name of the Mayan civilization and its people, a Mesoamerican civilization that stretched out in southern Mexico, Belize, Guatemela, El Salvador, and Honduras, though it’s of unknown meaning.  Maya is also an Indian girl’s name meaning “illusion” or “magic” in Sanskrit, featuring as a concept in Hinduism and Buddhism. In Hindu mythology, Maya is an epithet for Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, prosperity, and love, and Durga, a warrior goddess.

Maya is also a Hebrew female name meaning “water” derived from mayim (water).

In Japan, Maya is a unisex name that has a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used: “hemp,flax,linen + to be”; “ten thousand + to be”; “true + to be”; “true + night”; and “to rub, graze, grind + eight”; there are other meanings besides these.

Maya also seems to have been a male name in Ancient Egyptian, being the name of a High Priest of Amun in Ancient Egypt who lived during the 14th century during the reign of Akhenaten, as well as being the name of  a treasurer who lived in the 16th century, though I couldn’t find any meaning behind the name.

Maia is the name of one of the oldest of the Pleiades, seven nymphs who are the daughters of Atlas, a Titan, and Pleione, an Oceanid. By Zeus, she is the mother of the god Hermes, and also helped raise Arcas, the son of Zeus and Callisto, whose mother was turned into a bear by Hera. The name possibly means “good mother” in Greek, and was used as an honorific for motherly figures. Maia also means “midwife”.

Maia is also a Roman goddess of spring, the wife of Vulcan; her name comes from Latin maius meaning “great”, and the month of May is named after her.

Maia is also the Basque form of Maria, the Latin form of Hebrew name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr “love”.

Maia means “palm tree” in the Maori language.

Origin: Sanskrit, Greek, Roman, Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Maori, Japanese

Variants:

  • Maja (Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Polish)
  • Maïa (French)

 

Male forms:

  • Maj (Slovene)

 

 

Maya 麻也 (Japanese kanji) “hemp,flax,linen+to be

Maya 万也 (Japanese kanji) “ten thousand + to be”

Maya 真也 (Japanese kanji) “true + to be”

Maya 真夜 (Japanese kanji) “true + night”

Maya 摩八 (Japanese kanji)”to rub, graze, grind + eight”

 

 

Hercules

Hercules is the Latinized spelling of Greek name Herakles meaning “glory of Hera” from Greek elements kleos (glory) and the name of the goddess Hera. It’s rather an ironic name for the son of Zeus and a mortal woman, Alcmene, considering Hera hated him as she hated all of Zeus’s illegitimate offspring, and drove him mad enough to kill his wife Megara and their children, in which Hercules had to perform the Twelve Labors for penance. Hercules also had a twin brother, Iphicles, though he’s the son of Alcmene’s husband Amphitryon, and a full mortal. Apparently the same night Zeus seduced Alcmene (disguised as her husband), Amphitryon came home later that same night and slept with his wife, resulting in the birth of twin sons by different fathers).

As the son of a god, Hercules had great strength and killed many monsters. He was also very sexually active with many women (fathering many children) and men, and was killed (by accident) by his third wife Deianeira who was tricked into soaking his shirt with the blood of the centaur Nessus who attempted to kidnap and rape her before being killed by Hercules; after his death he became a full god and joined the other gods on Mount Olympus, where he married Hebe, the goddess of youth the cupbearer of the gods, and they had sons Alexiares and Anicetus.

Origin: Greek

Variants:

  • Herakles (Greek)
  • Heracles (Latinized spelling of Heracles)
  • Heraclius (Ancient Greek, Latinized spelling)
  • Herakleios (Ancient Greek)
  • Iraklis (Modern Greek)
  • Heraclio (Spanish)
  • Erekle (Georgian)
  • Irakli (Georgian)
  • Irakliy (Russian)
  • Hercule (French)
  • Ercole (Italian)
  • Ercwlff (Welsh)

 

Female forms:

  • Heraclea
  • Heracleia
  • Heraclia
  • Iraklia (Modern Greek)

 

 

Martin

Origin: Latin

Meaning: Martin comes from the Roman name Martinus meaning “belonging to Mars”, Mars being the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male”.

However, it’s possible that Mars is related to a much older source, perhaps from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture), his name of unknown meaning. Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavors, a cognate of Oscan Mamers, which could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”.

Mars could also be derived from the same Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”, which would make sense since Mars is the god of war.

As well as being a given name, Martin is also a common surname derived from the same source.

Marty/Martie is an obvious nickname for Martin.

Variants:

  • Martinus (Ancient Roman, Dutch)
  • Maarten (Dutch)
  • Marten (Dutch)
  • Martijn (Dutch)
  • Merten (German)
  • Mårten (Swedish)
  • Morten (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Márton (Hungarian)
  • Martti (Finnish)
  • Mattin (Basque)
  • Martí (Catalan)
  • Máirtín (Irish)
  • Martino (Italian)
  • Martynas (Lithuanian)
  • Marcin (Polish)
  • Martim (Portuguese)
  • Martinho (Portuguese)
  • Martín (Spanish)
  • Martyn (Welsh, Ukrainian)

 

Feminine forms:

  • Martine (French, Dutch, Norwegian, English)
  • Martina (German, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, English, Dutch, Swedish, Ancient Roman)