January

January is the name of the first year of the month. It comes from Roman cognomen Januarius meaning "January" from Latin ianus meaning “archway, covered passageway” derived from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ey- (to go). Januarius gets its name from the Roman god Janus, who was the god of doorways, transitions, and beginnings, depicted with two heads- one looking forward and the other backward, looking to the future and … Continue reading January

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Korus

Korus could be a variant spelling of Chorus, a word referring to a group of people singing in unison. It comes from Latin chorus derived from Ancient Greek khorós meaning "ring dance, round dance; band, troop" perhaps derived from a Proto-Indo-European root word of uncertain meaning, perhaps from *gher- (1) (to enclose) or *gher- (2) (to like, want). Korus is also a Latvian word, … Continue reading Korus

Cerelia

Cerelia seems to be a variant of Cerealia which is the name of an ancient Roman festival held in honor of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture (and the Roman equivalent of Greek goddess Demeter). The names comes from Latin crescere (to grow, increase, expand) derived from Proto-Indo-European *ḱer- (to grow, increase). Another possible meaning behind the name is that it may be a … Continue reading Cerelia

Maraya

Maraya is a variant spelling of Mariah, itself a variant form of Maria which comes from the Hebrew female name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian source either meaning “beloved” from myr, … Continue reading Maraya

Noctiluca

Noctiluca is a female name meaning "something which shines by night" from Latin nox (moon) which derives from Proto-Indo-European *nókʷts (night) and luceo (to shine) which also derives from Proto-Indo-European root *lewk- (to shine, bright; to see); so the name could essentially refer to a moon or a lantern or a lamp or anything that lights up during the night. Noctiluca is the … Continue reading Noctiluca

Jana

Jana is a multicultural name with several possible meanings: it is the Latinized form of Jane, the feminine form of John which comes from Hebrew male name Yochanan meaning “Yahweh is gracious”; Jana is also the Czech, Slovak, Dutch, German, Slovene, and Catalan feminine form of Jan, a variant form of Johannes which also derives from John;  it's also the Serbian and Croatian form of Ana, a … Continue reading Jana

Mario

Mario is the Italian and Spanish form of Marius, an Ancient Roman family name which could be derived from Latin mas meaning "male" or Latin mare meaning "sea". It could also be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart of the Greek god Ares), a name of uncertain etymology though it's possible that Mars was … Continue reading Mario

Mara

Mara is a female given name with multiple origins and meanings: Mara is a Hebrew female name meaning "bitter", taken on by Naomi from the Old Testament after she had lost her husband and sons, as well as also being a Croatian and Serbian variant of Marija, which comes from the Hebrew female name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning … Continue reading Mara

Mark

Mark is the English form of Marcus, an Ancient Roman name which seems to be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” though it might also be from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”. … Continue reading Mark

Letitia

Letitia is a variant form of Laetitia which comes from Latin laetus meaning "joy, happiness, glad". In Roman mythology, Laetitia is the goddess of happiness and gaiety. Nicknames: Letty/Lettie, Tisha Origin: Latin Variants: Laetitia (Ancient Roman, English, French) Lettice (English) Letizia (Italian) Leticia (Spanish) Letícia (Portuguese, Hungarian) Latisha (African-American, English) Lateesha