Tamerlane

Tamerlane is the westernized form of Timur which comes from Proto-Turkic temür meaning “iron”. Timur was a Turkic-Mongol emperor who was known as Timur the Lame by Europeans, which became Tamerlane, because of wounds sustained by arrows that struck his right leg and hand which gave him crippling injuries.

Origin: Proto-Turkic

Variants:

  • Tamerlan
  • Timur (Tatar, Chechen, Kazakh, Uzbek, Russian, Turkish)
  • Timour
  • Temir (Kazakh)
  • Temur (Georgian)
  • Temuri (Georgian)
  • Temür (Old Turkic)
  • Demir (Turkish)
  • Timur (Turkish)

 

Lubna

Lubna is an Arabic female name meaning “storax (tree)” in Arabic, storax being a type of tree from which a liquid balsam could be obtained from it, used in perfumes and medicine. There’s a 7th century Arabic love story of Qays and Lubna. They grew up in the same tribe and Qays loved Lubna but her father refused to allow him to marry her and she was soon married off to another man. Qays grew crazy with his unobtainable love and he left his tribe and began wandering around in the desert, reciting poetry to himself or writing poetry in the sand with a stick. Lubna died of an illness soon after her marriage and he was later found dead at the grave of an unknown woman where he had graved three verses of poetry on a nearby rock. There are other versions of the story.

Origin: Arabic

Variants:

  • Loubna

 

Tova

Tova is a Hebrew female name meaning “good”, though it’s also a Swedish variant of Tove, a modern form of Old Norse Tófa which is a short form of Old Norse Þórfríðr (or Thorfrither) meaning “Thor is beautiful” or “beautiful Thor” from Þórr/Thor (Thor) and fríðr (beautiful, beloved), Thor being the Norse god of thunder, strength, war and storms; his name fittingly means “thunder”.

Origin: Hebrew, Old Norse

Variants:

  • Tovah (Hebrew)
  • Tove (Swedish)
  • Tuva (Swedish, Norwegian)
  • Þórfríðr (Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Thorfrithr

 

Olin

Olin is a unisex name, a feminine form of Oline from Scandinavian male name Ole, the Danish and Norwegian masculine form of Olaf which comes from Old Norse Áleifr meaning “ancestor’s descendant” from Old Norse elements anu (ancestor) and leifr (descendant). Olin could also be the male form of Olina which also comes from the same source as Oline. Spelled Olenit’s the Russian word for “deer” as well as also possibly being a variat of Middle English holin, the word for holly.

As a surname, Olin could be from Germanic element odal meaning “heritage, fatherland”.

Origin: Old Norse, Russian, Middle English, Germanic

Female forms:

  • Oline (Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Finnish, Greenlandic)
  • Olina (Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Greenlandic, Finnish)

 

Male forms:

  • Ole (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Olaf (Danish, Norwegian, German, Dutch, Polish)
  • Olen

 

Terry

Terry is an English unisex name originally used as a diminutive of Terence (which comes from Roman family name Terentius which is of uncertain meaning though it could be derived from Latin terens meaning “rubbing, wearing away” from Latin terere (to rub, to wear out) though it might also be related to Sabine terenus meaning “soft”) or Theresa ( comes from Greek Therasia, the name of an island (the name is of uncertain meaning but has been linked to several possible meanings such as Greek theros “summer”, therizo “to harvest, to reap”, ther “wild beast”, or therao “to hunt”).

As an surname, however, Terry comes from medieval given name Thierry, the Norman French form of Theodoric meaning “ruler of the people” from Germanic elements theud (people) and ric (power); it could also be an anglicized form of Gaelic surname Mac Toirdhealbhaigh meaning “son of Toirdhealbhach”, the latter being a personal given name meaning “one who is like Thor” or “one who is like thunder”; or it’s a French surname deirved from Occitan terrin meaning “earthenware vessel, earthenware vase”, an occupational surname for a potter, which comes from Latin terra (earth).

Origin: Latin, Greek, Germanic, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Terrie
  • Terri
  • Teri

 

Aster

Aster is the name of a flower derived from Greek astḗr meaning “star”. It could also have been used as either a misspelling or a variant spelling of Esther, a name of uncertain etymology though it could be related to Persian meaning “star”; Esther has also been linked to Ishtar, the Mesopotamian goddess of love, fertility, and war, though the meaning is unknown. As a surname, it could be derived from Middle High German agelster meaning “magpie”.

Origin: Greek, Persian

Variants:

  • Astra (English)
  • Astraea (Greek)
  • Astraia (Greek)
  • Esther (English, French, Spanish, Dutch, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish)
  • Ester (Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Czech, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish)

 

Dennis

Dennis is the English form of Dionysius, the name of the Greek god of the vine, wine, pleasure, festivity, madness, and wild frenzy, who represented both the intoxicating madness of wine as well as its beneficient qualities. He was the son of Zeus and the Theban princess Semele, making him the only god with a mortal parent and the last god to enter the Greek pantheon.

Although the etymology of his name isn’t quite clear-cut, the first part of the name, Dio-, means “of Zeus” though it could also be related to Proto-Indo-European *dyews meaning “sky, heaven, god” and “shining”. The second part -nysus might be derived from Nysa, the name of a mountain in which Dionysios was raised by the nymphs who loved there; the name might be related to an archaic Greek word meaning “tree”.

Dennis is also a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Denis (French, Russian, English, German, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Romanian, Croatian)
  • Denys (Ukrainian, English)
  • Denny (English)
  • Dennie (English)
  • Dionýz (Slovak)
  • Dionisie (Romanian)
  • Dénes (Hungarian)
  • Tenney (medieval English diminutive of Denis)
  • Dinis (Portuguese)
  • Diniz (Portuguese)
  • Dionísio (Portuguese)
  • Dionisio (Spanish)
  • Deon (English)
  • Deion (English)
  • Dion (Ancient Greek, English short form of Dionysios)
  • Dionysos (Ancient Greek)
  • Dionysios (Ancient Greek)
  • Dionysius (Ancient Greek)

 

Female forms:

  • Denise (English, French, Dutch)
  • Denice (English)
  • Deniece (English)
  • Denisa (Czech, Slovak, Romanian)
  • Dionisia (Italian, Spanish)
  • Dionísia (Portuguese)
  • Dionysia (Late Roman)
  • Diot (Medieval English diminutive of Dionysia)
  • Dye (Medieval English diminutive of Dionysia)

 

Lucky

Lucky is an English word referring to something or someone having or is marked by good luck or someone or something that is fortunate, and often used as a nickname for someone who is lucky though it could also be used as a given name. Lucky is also a surname derived from the given name Luke/Lucas, the English form of Greek Loukas meaning “from Lucania”, the name of a region in southern Italy. Though the name is of uncertain meaning, Lucania could be related to Greek leukos “white”, “light, bright, shining”, a cognate of Latin lux “light”. It could also be derived from the Latin word lucus (a cognate of lucere “shining, bright”) meaning “sacred wood” or Greek lykos meaning “wolf”.

Origin: Greek, Latin

 

Variants:

  • Luck

 

Ashton

Ashton comes from an English surname derived from a place name meaning “ash tree town”, composed from Old English elements aesc (ash tree) and tun (enclosure, settlement).

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Asheton

 

Wynstan

Wynstan is a variant spelling of Wynnstan, an Old English name meaning “joy stone” from elements wynn (joy) and stan (stone). It could also be a variant spelling of Winston, which could either be derived from Wynnstan, or else it derives from the name of a town made up from Old English wine/win (friend) and tun (settlement) meaning “friend’s settlement” or “Wine’s settlement”, Wine being a personal given name from Old English win/wine. It’s also a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Wynnstan (Anglo-Saxon)