Seraphin

Seraphin is a male given name which comes from Latin Seraphinus which derives from Hebrew s'rafím, the plural form of saráf which means "to burn". Seraph refers to the highest order of angels with six wings, hands, and feet. They supposedly emit such a bright light that no one can look straight at them which is why they are known as the "fiery … Continue reading Seraphin

Advertisements

Malduc

Malduc is the name of a powerful sorcerer in the Arthurian legends who helped Arthur get Guinevere back after she was kidnapped. The meaning of the name is uncertain though it may be linked to Máel Máedóc meaning "disciple of Máedóc", Máedóc perhaps being a diminutive of Aodh meaning "my little Aodh", the latter derived from Áed meaning "fire" while Máel means "servant, devout follower" when combined with a … Continue reading Malduc

Brant

Brant comes from an English surname which derives from an Old Norse given name, Brandr, meaning either "sword" or "fire" from Proto-Germanic *brandaz (firebrand, torch; sword; flaming; fire) via Proto-Indo-European *bʰrenu- (to seethe; spew forth; burn). Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Brandr (Ancient Scandinavian) Brand (English) Brandt (English)  

Kenneth

Kenneth is the anglicized form of two Gaelic names: Coinneach which derives from Gaelic caoin meaning "handsome, fair, beautiful, kind"; and Cináed meaning "born of fire". Kenneth is also a surname derived from the given name. Nicknames: Ken, Kenny Origin: Gaelic Variants: Coinneach (Scottish) Cináed (Scottish, Irish) Kennith (English) Kennet (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) Cainneach (Irish) Cionaodh (Irish) Cinioch (Irish) Ciniod … Continue reading Kenneth

Aithley

Aithley is an English female name which seems to have originally been a surname. The meaning behind it is unclear. I've seen it listed as meaning "born in a garden" but I'm not too convinced of the meaning. I know that the last part, -ley, comes from Old English lēah meaning "clearing, meadow, woodland", so the surname might have … Continue reading Aithley

Keegan

Keegan comes from an Irish surname, the anglicized form of Mac Aodhagáin, meaning "son of Aodhagán", the latter a pet diminutive (or sort of nickname) for Aodh, a male given name meaning "fire" from Old Irish Áed deriving from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eydʰ- (to burn, kindle; fire). Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Keagan (English) Kegan (English) Egan (English) Eagan (English)  

Cadrian

Cadrian seems to be a modern English name, either an elaborated form of Cade, which has a variety of meanings and origins such as: being an English surname derived from a metonymic occupational surname for a cooper (someone who made and repaired barrels) which comes from Old French cade (cask, barrel); it could also be from a Medieval English given … Continue reading Cadrian

Erragal

Erragal is a Mespotamian (Sumerian and Akkadian) god of the underworld. The origin of the name is uncertain though there are several theories: it could be a combination of Erra and Sumerian gal (great) meaning "Erra the great"; Erra being the Mesopotamian god of war, plagues, and the bringer of pestilence who was later assimilated with Nergal. Although the … Continue reading Erragal

Nina

Nina is the name of a Sumerian fertility goddess who was also identified with Ishtar and Inanna. Her name in cuneiform is written with a fish inside of a house and means "water lady" or "lady of the water" from Sumerian nin (lady) and a (water). The city of Ninevah was named after her. Nina is also the Russian … Continue reading Nina

Brandy

Brandy is the name of an alcoholic drink, the shortened for of brandywine which is derived from Dutch brandewijn meaning "distilled wine" or "burnt wine". It could also be a short form, or a feminine form, of Brandon, an English surname derived from a place name meaning “hill covered with broom” from Old English brom (broom, gorse) and dun (hill), likely referring to someone … Continue reading Brandy