Nina

Nina is the name of a Sumerian fertility goddess who was also identified with Ishtar and Inanna. Her name in cuneiform is written with a fish inside of a house and means “water lady” or “lady of the water” from Sumerian nin (lady) and (water). The city of Ninevah was named after her. Nina is also the Russian form of Nino, a Georgian feminine name of Ninos/Ninus, of uncertain meaning but possibly related to the Sumerian goddess Nina.

Nina is also a shortened form of names such as Antonina (an Italian feminine form of Anthony of uncertain meaning) and Giannina (an Italian diminutive of Giovanna ultimately deriving from John meaning “Yahweh is gracious”), as well as being a Spanish word meaning “girl” and a Quechua and Aymara word meaning “fire” (Quechua and Aymara is a language used in South America by the indigenous people).

I’ve also seen it as also deriving from Old Slavic word ninati meaning “dreamer” or “dream”.

Nina is also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used. From the first element ni it could mean 仁 “benevolent, humane, noble”, “two” 二, “rainbow” 虹, “cinnabar” 丹, “to resemble, imitate, counterfeit” 似, “hope, request, beg” 希, “hue, color, variegated” 彩, “new” 新, “to laugh, smile” 笑; while the second element na has the possible meanings of 菜 “vegetables, greens”, 那 “what”, 名 “name”, 奈 “apple tree”, 和 “harmony”, 愛 “love, affection”. *I’m not a native Japanese speaker but I tried the best I could to be as accurate as possible to the best of my ability, though there may be some mistakes*

Origin: Sumerian, Hebrew, Old Slavic, Quechua, Aymara, Japanese

Variants:

  • Nena (English)
  • Nino (Georgian, Ancient Near Eastern)

 

 

Brandy

Brandy is the name of an alcoholic drink, the shortened for of brandywine which is derived from Dutch brandewijn meaning “distilled wine” or “burnt wine”. It could also be a short form, or a feminine form, of Brandon, an English surname derived from a place name meaning “hill covered with broom” from Old English brom (broom, gorse) and dun (hill), likely referring to someone who lived near a place covered with gorse or broom shrubs.

However, Brandon could also be derived from Old French brandon from Frankish *brand meaning “firebrand, torch, sword” which ultimately comes from Proto-Germanic *brandaz, a cognate of Old Norse brandr.

Origin: Dutch, Old English, Proto-Germanic

 

Variants:

  • Brandee (English)
  • Brandi (English)
  • Brandie (English)
  • Brande (English)
  • Branda (English)

 

Male forms:

  • Brandon
  • Branden

 

Adriano

Adriano is the Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese form of Adrian, the English form of Latin Hadrian derived from Roman cognomen Hadrianus meaning “from Hadria” or “from Adria”, Adria being another form of the name. It referred to someone who came from the town of Hadria/Adria situated in Northern Italy. The Adriatic sea received its name from the town. Though the origin behind the name is uncertain, it could be from Illyrian adur meaning “water, sea” though it could also be from Latin atra, a neuter of atrum meaning “black city”, which comes from Proto-Indo-European root *ater (fire).

Adriano is also a Spanish and Italian surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin, Illyrian, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Adrian (English, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian)
  • Adrien (French)
  • Hadrianus (Ancient Roman)
  • Hadrian (Roman)
  • Adrià (Catalan)
  • Adrijan (Macedonian, Croatian)
  • Jadran (Croatian, Serbian, Slovene)
  • Jadranko (Croatian, Serbian, Slovene)
  • Adriaan (Dutch)
  • Arjan (Dutch)
  • Adrianus (Dutch)
  • Adorján (Hungarian)
  • Adrián (Hungarian, Spanish)

 

Female forms:

  • Adriana (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, English)
  • Adrianna (Polish, English)
  • Adriana (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, English)
  • Adrianne (English)
  • Hadriana (Ancient Roman)
  • Hadria (Roman)
  • Adria (English)
  • Adrijana (Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian)
  • Jadranka (Croatian, Serbian, Slovene)
  • Adrienne (French)
  • Adrienn (Hungarian)

 

Topaz

Topaz comes from Old French topaze, topace which comes from Greek topazos which is derived from Sanskrit tapas meaning “heat, fire”. However, according to Roman author, naturalist, and philosopher Pliny, the name came from a remote island in the Red Sea called Topazein meaning “to divine, to locate” though that seems to be folk etymology rather than fact.

Topaz is the birthstone of Novemer and associated with love and good luck, as well as believed to have healing properties.

Origin: Sanskrit

Variants:

  • Topaze

 

Titus

Titus comes from an Ancient Roman given name of unknown meaning though it has been linked to Latin titulus meaning “title of honor” or Latin titio “fire-brand”. It’s likely, however, that the name is pre-Roman in origin, possibly Sabine, and its true meaning lost to time. Titus is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin, Sabine

Variants:

  • Tito (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Tiitus (Estonian, Finnish)
  • Titos (Biblical Greek)
  • Titas (Lithuanian)
  • Tytus (Polish)
  • Tit (Russian)
  • Titius (Ancient Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Titia (Ancient Roman, Dutch, German)
  • Tita (Ancient Roman)

 

Arden

Arden is a place name and a surname that comes from Celtic *ardwo meaning “high”. It was used as the name of a forest in William Shakespere’s play As You Like It (roughly around 1599), as well as being the name of a real forest in Warwickshire, England. Arden was also the maiden name of Shakespeare’s mother, Mary Arden.

Another possible meaning I’ve seen for Arden is “eagle valley” which comes from Old English earn (eagle) and dun (valley).

Arden is also a word in Spanish, the third person plural of arder meaning “to burn”, derived from Latin ardere. 

Origin: Celtic, Old English, Latin

 

 

 

Brandon

Brandon is from an English surname derived from a place name meaning “hill covered with broom” from Old English brom (broom, gorse) and dun (hill), likely referring to someone who lived near a place covered with gorse or broom shrubs.

However, Brandon could also be derived from Old French brandon from Frankish *brand meaning “firebrand, torch, sword” which ultimately comes from Proto-Germanic *brandaz, a cognate of Old Norse brandr.

It could also be a various form of Brendan, an Irish name derived from Welsh brenin meaning “prince” from Celtic brigantinos meaning “king, prince”, “lord” or “high one”.

Origin: Old English, Proto-Germanic, Old Norse, Celtic

Variants:

  • Branden (English)
  • Brendan (Irish, English)

 

Aiden

Origin: Irish

Meaning: Aiden is a variant spelling of Aidan, which is the Anglicized form of Aodhán from Old Irish Áedán, a diminutive of Áed (or Aodh) with the diminutive suffix -an meaning “fire” or “fiery” so Aiden would mean “little fire” or “little fiery one”.

In Irish mythology Aodh (pronounced ae like hay) is one of the sons of Lir, the twin brother of Fionnuala, and brother of Conn and Fiachra (also twins) who were cursed to be swans for 900 years by their jealous stepmother.

Variants:

  • Aidan (Irish, Scottish, English)
  • Aden (English)
  • Aydan (English)
  • Ayden (English)
  • Aedan (English, Irish)
  • Edan (Irish, Scottish)
  • Áed (Ancient Irish)
  • Áedán (Ancient Irish)
  • Áedh (Ancient Irish)
  • Aodh (Irish, Scottish)
  • Aodhán (Irish, Scottish)
  • Aodhagán (Irish, Scottish)
  • Iagan (Scottish)