Terry

Terry is an English unisex name originally used as a diminutive of Terence (which comes from Roman family name Terentius which is of uncertain meaning though it could be derived from Latin terens meaning “rubbing, wearing away” from Latin terere (to rub, to wear out) though it might also be related to Sabine terenus meaning “soft”) or Theresa ( comes from Greek Therasia, the name of an island (the name is of uncertain meaning but has been linked to several possible meanings such as Greek theros “summer”, therizo “to harvest, to reap”, ther “wild beast”, or therao “to hunt”).

As an surname, however, Terry comes from medieval given name Thierry, the Norman French form of Theodoric meaning “ruler of the people” from Germanic elements theud (people) and ric (power); it could also be an anglicized form of Gaelic surname Mac Toirdhealbhaigh meaning “son of Toirdhealbhach”, the latter being a personal given name meaning “one who is like Thor” or “one who is like thunder”; or it’s a French surname deirved from Occitan terrin meaning “earthenware vessel, earthenware vase”, an occupational surname for a potter, which comes from Latin terra (earth).

Origin: Latin, Greek, Germanic, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Terrie
  • Terri
  • Teri

 

Belisarius

Belisarius is the name of a renowned and famous general of the Byzantine Empire under the rule of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I and was called the Last of the Romans because he was believed to embody the values of the Ancient Roman civilization. The meaning behind the name is unknown. Belisarius was born in Illyria, the western part of the Balkan peninsula, so his name might be Illyric in origin. Another theory I’ve seen posted is that it might be derived from Slavonic Beli-tzar meaning “white prince” although that origin seems to be seriously in doubt. It’s also possible that his name is related to Belisama, a Celtic goddess whose name is uncertain though the first part of the name, bel-, which means either “bright” or “strong” or “powerful” while the second part of the name, -isama-, means “most” or “greatest” so the name essentially means “brightest” or “most powerful”. The second part of the name might also be related to Proto-Celtic *samos (summer) so the name may also mean “summer bright” which may make sense she is the goddess of fire and light as well as possibly being a goddess of the Ribble river in Merseyside, England.

Belisarius is also the name of a genus of scorpion.

Nicknames: Bel

Origin: Slavic, Proto-Celtic

Variants:

  • Belisario (Spanish, Italian)
  • Bellisario (Italian)
  • Bellisarius (English)
  • Bélisaire (French)

 

Female forms:

  • Belisaria (English)
  • Bellisaria (English)

 

Sabrina

Sabrina is the Latin form of Old Welsh Habren or Hafren, the original name of the River Severen in the United Kingdom. The name might be derived from Proto-Celtic *samaros meaning “summer fallow, fallow land” from Proto-Celtic *samos (summer) and *aros (ploughing, ploughed land), or from *samos (summer) and *renwo- (quick, fast) or it could possibly mean “boundary” from an unknown source. Sabrina could also be an Arabic name derived from Arabicصبر (sabr) meaning “patient”. 

According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, the river received its name from the daughter of Locrinus, a king of the Britons, and his mistress Estrildis, a captured Germanic princess who was originally brought to Britain as a captive by the Huns. Locrinus fell in love with her but he was already bethrothed to Gwendolen, the daughter of Corineus and an ally of his father’s, and though he went through with the marriage and had a son by her, Locrinus kept Estrildis a secret by locking her in a cave underground and visiting her there. He had his daughter by her. When Corineus died, Locrinus left Gwendolen and took Estrildis as his queen. In response, Gwendolen assembled an army during which he was killed in battle, and Gwendolen had Estrildis and Sabrina/Habren drowned in the river which now bears her name.

Origin: Proto-Celtic, Arabic

Variants:

  • Sabryna (English)
  • Zabrina (English)
  • Habren (Welsh)
  • Hafren (Welsh)
  • Severn (English)
  • Sabre
  • Sabren
  • Averne

 

Nanaka

Nanaka is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used, such as “vegetables, greens + flower” (菜々花/ 菜々華); “vegetables, greens + summer” (菜々夏); “vegetables, greens + fragrance” (菜々香); “vegetables, greens + day, sun, Japan” (菜々日); “seven +flower, splendor” (七華); and likely other meanings. Nanaka was also the name of an ancient village in India (now known as Nana) although I couldn’t find a meaning behind the name.

Origin: Japanese

 

 

June

June is the sixth month of the year according to the Julian calendar. The name derives from the Roman goddess Juno, wife of Jupiter and goddess of marriage and women; Hera is her Greek counterpart. Her name is possibly related to Latin iuvenis meaning “youthful” from Proto-Indo-European *yeu- meaning “vital force”, related to her role as a goddess of childbirth.

June may also be related to Latin iuniores meaning “the younger ones”.

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Junie
  • Juno
  • Junia (Ancient Roman)

 

Male forms:

  • Junius (Ancient Roman)

 

Momoka

Momoka is a Japanese female name with various meanings such as: 杏果 “apricot fruit”, 百夏 “hundred summer”, 桃華 “peach flower”, 百花 “hundred flower”, 桃花 “peach flower”, 咲花 “blossom flower”, and likely other meanings depending on the kanji used. Momo can also be used as a given name on its own, as well as used with other name elements such as Momoko with the kanji for child (子), as well as Momotaro, a male name.

Origin: Japanese

 

Fuyu

Fuyu is a Japanese unisex name (as well as a word) meaning 冬 “winter” though there are other meanings depending on the kanji used, such as Fuyuki, a male name meaning 冬木 “winter + tree, wood, timber” or 冬樹 “winter + tree, to plant, to cultivate” and likely other meanings; Fuyumi, a Japanese female name meaning: 冬美 “winter + beauty, beautiful”, 冬実 “winter + reality, truth”, 不由美 “not, non, un- + cause, reason + beauty, beautiful”; and Fuyuka, 冬佳 “winter +beautiful, good, auspicious”, 冬香 “winter +fragrance”, 冬加 “winter +add, addition, increase”, 冬可 “winter +permitted, allowed”, 冬花 “winter +flower”, and other meanings.

Origin: Japanese

Aki

Aki is a Japanese unisex name (as well as a word) meaning 秋 “autumn” though it has other meanings such as 燦 “brilliant, bright, radiance”, 明 “clear, tomorrow, bright”, 昭 “shining”, 彬 “refined, gentle”, 爽 “refreshing, clear, invigorating”, 晶 “clear, crystal, sparkle”, 暁 “daybreak, dawn”, 彰 “acknowledge”, 晃 “clear”, 亜紀 “Asia, come after, next + record, chronicle”, 愛希 “love, affection + hope, desire, request”, as well as other meanings. Aki is also used as part of other names such as Akio and Akito, both male names, Akira, a unisex name, and Akiko, a female name. Aki is also a Japanese surname.

Aki is also a Finnish male name, the short form of Joakim, the Scandinavian, Macedonian, and Serbian form of Joachim, a contracted form of either Jehoiachin meaning “established by Yahweh”, or Jehoiakim meaning “raised by Yahweh”. Spelled Áki, it comes from Old Norse meaning “ancestor”.

Origin: Japanese, Old Norse

 

Natsu

Natsu is a Japanese unisex name (as well as a word name) meaning 夏 “summer”, and is used as a name element among names like Natsuki, a unisex name with a variety of meanings such as 夏稀 (summer + rare); 夏生 (summer + life); 夏紀 (summer + chronicle); and 夏樹 (summer + wood); Natsuko, a female name meaning “summer child” with the kanji 夏子; and Natsumi, a female name meaning: 夏美 (summer + beauty), 夏実 “summer + reality, truth”, and 夏海 (summer + sea, ocean).

Natsu also has other meanings depending on the kanji used, such as 七津 (seven + haven, port, ferry, harbor); 南月 (south + moon); 名都 (name + capital, city); 和津 (harmonious + haven, port, ferry, harbor); and others.

Origin: Japanese