Trip

Trip comes from a word referring to a journey or a voyage, or it refers to someone who stumbles and falls. It comes from Old French tripper (strike with the feet, tread or skip lightly) which comes from a Germanic source; or it could be from Middle Dutch trippen meaning “to skip, hop, trot, stamp, trample”. Tri- is also a Latin root word meaning “three”, used in conjection with other words such as triple and trisect, so Trip could be used with that in mind, or it could also be used as  nickname for someone who is the third (III) generation of the same name.

Origin: Old French Middle Dutch, Latin

Variants:

  • Tripp (English)

 

Onika

Onika is an African female name though there doesn’t seem to be a lot of accurate information on it. I’ve seen it with various meanings of “warrior”, or it could be derived from Yoruba meaning “one in possession of”, or it could be a short form of Onyekachi, an Igbo name meaning “who is greater than God?” Onika is also a Maori word meaning “onyx”. Spelled Oni-ka (鬼化) it’s a Japanese word meaning “devil”.

Origin: African, Maori, Japanese

Variants:

  • Oneika
  • Onyeka (short form of Onyekachi)

 

Rita

Rita is a short form of Margarita, the Latinate form of Margaret which comes from Ancient Greek margarítēs meaning “pearl” ultimately derived from Sanskrit manyari. I’ve also seen it listed as also being an Indian female name, derived from Sanskrit rit meaning “true, enlightened, luminous, brave, honest” .

Rita is also a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used, such as 理多 “reason + abundance, many”, 莉多 “jasmine + abundance, many”, and other meanings depending on the kanji used.

Origin: Sanskrit, Japanese

Variants:

  • Margarita (Spanish, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Late Roman)
  • Margherita (Italian)

 

Gale

Gale refers to a very strong wind derived from gaile meaning “wind” of uncertain origin though perhaps related to Old Norse gol (breeze) or Old Danish gal meaning “bad, furious” in reference to the wind, derived from Old Norse gala meaning “to shout, charm away” or from Old English galan meaning “to sing, enchant, call” which ultimately derives form Proto-Indo-European gʰel- (to call, chant, shout). Gale is also a surname derived from Old English gal meaning “jovial, merry”, originally a nickname for a cheerful person. Another possible source is it comes from Norman French gaoile meaning “jail”, an occupational name for a jailer or perhaps someone who lived near a jail.

It’s also a nickname for Abigale or a variant spelling of Gail, both of which come from Hebrew meaning “my father is joy”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Old English, Norman French, Hebrew

Variants:

  • Gail
  • Gayle

 

Lisetta

Lisetta is an Italian diminutive of Elizabeth, which comes from Hebrew ‘Elisheva meaning “my God is an oath” or “my God is abundance”.

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Lysetta (English)
  • Lisette (French, English)
  • Lysette (English)
  • Lizette (English)

 

Ara

Ara is the Latin word for “altar” as well as the name of a constellation in the southern hemisphere. According to Greek mythology, it received its name when the Greek gods overthrew the Titans and the smoke from the altar was what the Milky Way represented. Other possible meanings in Latin are “refuge” and “protection, sanctuary” while in Greek ara means “prayer”, “vow”, and “curse”. Ara is also the singular form of Arai (also spelled Arae), female spirits (or daimones) of curses summoned from the underworld by the dead on those responsible for their deaths. They’re often confused with the Furies (Erinyes) and seem to be the children of Nyx, goddess of the night.

Ara is also the name of a legendary Armenian prince also known as Ara the Handsome because he was so beautiful that even the legendary queen Semiramis (known as Shamiram in Armenian) waged a war to capture him but he ended up being killed in battle. The meaning behind the name is unknown. Ara could also be a variant spelling of Arah, a Hebrew male name meaning “wayfarer, wanderer”. It could also be a nickname for names that being with Ara such as Arabella, Araceli, Ariadne and Arianna, etc. It’s also a place name in several places, as well as also being a Korean female name meaning “to know, to be wise” (아라).

Origin: Latin, Greek, Armenian, Hebrew, Korean

Variants:

  • Arah (Hebrew)
  • Arra (English)

 

Roma

Roma is the Latin name for the city of Rome, a name of uncertain etymology though the name’s origins have often been linked to its founder, Romulus, meaning “of Rome”. However, it’s likely that Romulus may have derived his name from the city and other theories regarding Rome’s meaning are: it might be from Greek rhōmē meaning “strength” or “might”; rheo or Latin ruo meaning “flow”; or from Etruscan ruma from the root word for “teat”, either in reference to the wolf that took in and suckled the infants Romulus and Remus in Roman mythology, or so named for the shape of the Palatine and Aventine hills.

Roma is also the Russian diminutive of Roman which comes from Latin Romanus meaning “Roman”, referring to a citizen of Rome, as well as also used to refer to the Roman goddess or personification of the ancient city of Rome in Roman mythology.

Origin: Uncertain, possibly Greek or Etruscan

Variants:

  • Roman (Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German)
  • Romanus (Latin)
  • Romanos (Latin, Greek)
  • Romain (French)
  • Romano (Italian)
  • Romeo (Italian)
  • Romolo (Italian form of Romulus)
  • Romaeus (Latin form of Romeo)
  • Romà (Catalan)
  • Román (Hungarian, Spanish)
  • Romão (Portuguese)

 

Female forms:

  • Romana (Italian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Late Roman)
  • Romola (Italian feminine form of Romulus)
  • Romaine (French, English)
  • Romane (French)
  • Romayne (English)
  • Romána (Hungarian)

 

Mitchell

Mitchell comes from a surname derived from the given name Michel, the French form of Michael meaning “who is like God?”, a rhetorical question implying there is no one like God. It could also be derived from Old English michel or mechel/muchel meaning “big”, originally a nickname for a big man. Mitchell has also been used as the Anglicized form of Irish surname Mulvihill which comes from Gaelic Ó Maoil Mhichíl “descendant of the devotee of St. Michael”, as well as also used as an Anglicized form of another surname, Mickschel, a Czech surname.

Nicknames: Mitch

Origin: Hebrew, Old English

Variants:

  • Mitchel (English)

 

Hilda

Hilda comes from Germanic element hild meaning “battle” as well as being a nickname for any name beginning with Hilde such as Hildebrand or Hildred. Hilda is also a cogante of Old Norse Hildr, the name of a Valkyrie in Norse mythology who had the power to revive the dead.

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Hildy (English)
  • Hylda (English)
  • Hilde (German, Dutch, Norwegian)
  • Hildur (Icelandic, Norwegian)
  • Hild (Old English)
  • Hildr (Ancient Scandinavian, Norse mythology)
  • Ilda (Italian)
  • Elda (Italian)