Tova

Tova is a Hebrew female name meaning “good”, though it’s also a Swedish variant of Tove, a modern form of Old Norse Tófa which is a short form of Old Norse Þórfríðr (or Thorfrither) meaning “Thor is beautiful” or “beautiful Thor” from Þórr/Thor (Thor) and fríðr (beautiful, beloved), Thor being the Norse god of thunder, strength, war and storms; his name fittingly means “thunder”.

Origin: Hebrew, Old Norse

Variants:

  • Tovah (Hebrew)
  • Tove (Swedish)
  • Tuva (Swedish, Norwegian)
  • Þórfríðr (Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Thorfrithr

 

Nadia

Nadia is a variant transcription of Nadiyya, an Arabic female name meaning “moist, tender, delicate” or “calling”, as well as a Slavic female name, a diminutive of Nadezhda meaning “hope”.

Origin: Arabic, Slavic

Variants:

  • Nadya (Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Arabic)
  • Nadiya (Ukrainian)
  • Nadja (German, Slovene)
  • Nadiyya (Arabic)
  • Nadiye (Turkish)
  • Nadezhda (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Ukrainian)

 

نديّة (Arabic) “moist, tender, delicate”

نادية (Arabic) “calling”

 

Terry

Terry is an English unisex name originally used as a diminutive of Terence (which comes from Roman family name Terentius which is of uncertain meaning though it could be derived from Latin terens meaning “rubbing, wearing away” from Latin terere (to rub, to wear out) though it might also be related to Sabine terenus meaning “soft”) or Theresa ( comes from Greek Therasia, the name of an island (the name is of uncertain meaning but has been linked to several possible meanings such as Greek theros “summer”, therizo “to harvest, to reap”, ther “wild beast”, or therao “to hunt”).

As an surname, however, Terry comes from medieval given name Thierry, the Norman French form of Theodoric meaning “ruler of the people” from Germanic elements theud (people) and ric (power); it could also be an anglicized form of Gaelic surname Mac Toirdhealbhaigh meaning “son of Toirdhealbhach”, the latter being a personal given name meaning “one who is like Thor” or “one who is like thunder”; or it’s a French surname deirved from Occitan terrin meaning “earthenware vessel, earthenware vase”, an occupational surname for a potter, which comes from Latin terra (earth).

Origin: Latin, Greek, Germanic, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Terrie
  • Terri
  • Teri

 

Lucky

Lucky is an English word referring to something or someone having or is marked by good luck or someone or something that is fortunate, and often used as a nickname for someone who is lucky though it could also be used as a given name. Lucky is also a surname derived from the given name Luke/Lucas, the English form of Greek Loukas meaning “from Lucania”, the name of a region in southern Italy. Though the name is of uncertain meaning, Lucania could be related to Greek leukos “white”, “light, bright, shining”, a cognate of Latin lux “light”. It could also be derived from the Latin word lucus (a cognate of lucere “shining, bright”) meaning “sacred wood” or Greek lykos meaning “wolf”.

Origin: Greek, Latin

 

Variants:

  • Luck

 

Valdis

Valdis is used as a short form of Latvian male name Voldemārs, the Latvian cognate of Germanic Waldemar which is derived from Slavic Vladimir meaning “famous ruler” or “great ruler” or “ruler of the world” from elements vladeti (to rule, to control) and meru (great, famous), though the second element of the name has also been associated with miru meaning “peace, world” so the name could also mean “peaceful ruler” or “world ruler”.

Valdis is also a variant form of Valdís, a female name composed from Old Norse valr “the dead (of battle)” or “the slain (in Valhalla)” and dís (goddess) so the name essentially means “goddess of the slain in battle”. It also seems to be a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Slavic, Old Norse

Variants:

  • Voldemārs (Latvian)
  • Waldemar (German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish)
  • Vladimir (Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic)
  • Waldomar (Ancient Germanic)
  • Valdimárr (Old Norse)
  • Wealdmær (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Uladzimir (Belarusian)
  • Vladimír (Czech, Slovak)
  • Valdemar (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Vladimer (Georgian)
  • Valdemaras (Lithuanian)
  • Visvaldas (Lithuanian)
  • Vladimiras (Lithuanian)
  • Voldemaras (Lithuanian)
  • Valdas (Lithuanian short form of Valdemaras)
  • Włodzimierz (Polish)
  • Volodymyr (Ukrainian)
  • Wolodymyr (Ukrainian)
  • Vsevolod (Russian, Ukrainian, Medieval Slavic)
  • Vladilen (Russian contraction of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin)
  • Vladlen (Russian contraction of Vladimir Lenin)

 

Female forms

  • Vladimira (Slovene Croatian)
  • Vladimíra (Czech, Slovak)

 

Dana

Dana is an English unisex name though it has multiple origins and meanings. As an English given name it’s derived from a surname, a variant of Dane, referring to someone who came from Denmark or had Danish descent. It could also be a variant of D’Aunay, a Huguenot French name derived from several place names in France called Aunay, of unknown meaning.

It’s also the feminine form of Daniel, a Hebrew male name meaning “God is my judge”, or a feminine form of Dan “judge”, as well as meaning a nickname for names such as Bogdana, a Slavic female name meaning “given by God”; Yordana, the Bulgarian feminine form of Jordan meaning “descend” or “flow down” though the name could also have been influenced by Jordanes, an Old German name that probably derives from Old Norse jord meaning “earth”; and Gordana, the feminine form of Gordan, a Slavic name meaning dignified”.  Dana is also a Persian unisex name meaning “wise”, “knowing”, “learned”. Spelled dána, it’s an Irish word meaning “bold” and “presumptuous”, as well as also being a modern form of Danu, the name of an Irish mother goddess and also a Hindu primordial goddess of the sea. Though the etymology behind the name is unclear I’ve seen it listed as meaning “swift flowing” though it also means “river” from the Avestan word dānu meaning “river”; the Danube river comes from this etymology.

Origin: English, Hebrew, Slavic, Persian, Irish,

Variants:

  • Dayna (English)

 

Mila

Mila (pr. mee-lah or my-lah) is a Slavic given name, often used as a short form for names such as Ludmila (love of the people), Milena (gracious, dear), Milica (gracious, dear), Camilla/Camila, or Milagros (miracles). It comes from the Slavic element milu meaning “gracious, dear”.

Origin: Slavic

 

Variants:

  • Myla (English)
  • Milla (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish)
  • Milena (Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Polish, Russian, Italian)
  • Miléna (Hungarian)
  • Milica (Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian)
  • Ludmila (Czech, Russian)
  • Camilla (English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman)
  • Camila (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Milagros (Spanish)

 

Male forms:

  • Milan (Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Dutch)
  • Milen (Bulgarian)
  • Milo (English, Ancient Germanic)
  • Miloš (Czech, Slovak, Serbian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian)
  • Mile (Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian)
  • Miloje (Serbian)

 

Rie

Rie (pr. ree-eh in Japanese; Forvo) is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used. Some possible meanings are: 理恵 “logic, reason + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 利恵 “profit, advantage, benefit + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 梨絵 “pear tree + picture, painting, drawing, sketch”; 理江 “logic, reason + inlet, bay, creek”; 理絵 “logic, reason +picture, painting, drawing, sketch”; 里枝 “village, hometown + bough, branch limb, twig”; 梨恵 “pear tree + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 里依 “village, hometown + reliant, depend on, consequently, therefore, due to”. There are likely other meanings depending on the kanji used.

Rie is also a Dutch female name (pr. rhee), used as a nickname for Hendrika, the feminine form of Hendrik, the Dutch and Estonian form of Henry which comes from a Germanic name meaning “home ruler”; and Marie, which comes from Maria, the Latin form of Hebrew name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr “love”. Rie has also been used as a male nickname for Henri, the French male form of Henry.

Spelled ríe, it’s the Spanish verb of ríer meaning “to laugh” which comes from Latin rīdēre (to laugh).

Origin: Japanese, Ancient Germanic, Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Latin

 

 

Sasha

Sasha is a unisex given name originally used as a nickname for given names Aleksandr and Aleksandra, the Russian and Ukrainian form of Greek Alexandros meaning “defending men” or “defender of men” composed from alexo (to defend, help) and aner (man).

Origin: Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Sacha (French)
  • Sascha (German)

 

Finn

Finn comes from an Irish name meaning “fair”, “blessed” or “white” derived from Proto-Celtic *windos (white). Finn is the older spelling of Fionn, which belongs to the name of a warrior in Irish myth known as Fionn mac Cumhaill (or Finn MacCool in English) and the leader of the Fianna. His birth name was Deimne but he was later nicknamed Fionn when his hair turned prematurely white.

Finn also comes from Old Norse Finnr meaning “a Finn, a Sami, Lapp”, a given name and byname used to refer to someone who came from Finland or was part of the Sami people (also known as Lapps). Although the origin behind  finnr is uncertain it has been linked to Old Norse meaning “wanderer”. Finnr is the name of a dawrf mentioned in the Völuspá, the first poem in the Poetic Edda, a collection of Old Norse poems. Finn is also a surname which could be be derived from both sources, as well as being a short form of names like Finley, Finnegan, or Thorfinn/Torfinn

Origin: Proto-Celtic, Old Norse

Varinats:

  • Fionn (Irish)
  • Fion (Irish)
  • Finnagán (Irish diminutive of Fionn)
  • Fionnán (Irish diminutive of Fionn)
  • Finnán (older form of Fionnán)
  • Finnr (Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Finnur (Icelandic)
  • Fína (Greenlandic)
  • Finna (Greenlandic)

 

Female forms:

  • Fiona (Scottish, English)
  • Finna (female form of Finnr; Old Norse, Icelandic, Danish, Norwegian)