Dinah

Dinah (pr. die-nah) is a Hebrew female name meaning “judged” or “vindicated” in Hebrew. It was the name of Jacob and Leah’s daughter in the Old Testament.

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Dina (Hebrew, English)

 

Joden

Joden seems to be a modern name, either an elaborated form of Jody, a diminutive of Joe or Joseph (though it’s also been used as a nickname for Judith), a Hebrew male name meaning “Yahweh will increase” or “Yahweh will add”; or it could a variant spelling of Jodan, which could be a combination of given names Joe/Joseph and Dan, a Hebrew male name meaning “judge, to judge” or “he judged”.

In the Dutch and Danish language, Joden (spelled Jøden) means “Jew” and was used as an ethonym for the Jewish people, as well as also being a Spanish word, the present form of joder in the third person plural, meaning “to fuck/to fuck with” and “to screw around/with, to piss off, to suck”, though in Spanish the J is pronounced like an H, so it would be pronounced ho-den. It’s derived form Latin futuerethe present active infinitive of futuo.

Joden is also the Norwegian definite masculine singular of jod, as well as the Swedish definite singular of jod, meaning “iodine” which comes from Greek ioeidḗs meaning “violet” with the -ine suffix. And lastly, Jōdan (上段) is a karate term meaning something like “upper level” or “high level” and refers to the upper part of the body (the shoulders and above), as well as also being a Japanese word meaning “joke, , jest” (冗談).

Origin: Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Japanese

Variants:

  • Jodan

 

Lubna

Lubna is an Arabic female name meaning “storax (tree)” in Arabic, storax being a type of tree from which a liquid balsam could be obtained from it, used in perfumes and medicine. There’s a 7th century Arabic love story of Qays and Lubna. They grew up in the same tribe and Qays loved Lubna but her father refused to allow him to marry her and she was soon married off to another man. Qays grew crazy with his unobtainable love and he left his tribe and began wandering around in the desert, reciting poetry to himself or writing poetry in the sand with a stick. Lubna died of an illness soon after her marriage and he was later found dead at the grave of an unknown woman where he had graved three verses of poetry on a nearby rock. There are other versions of the story.

Origin: Arabic

Variants:

  • Loubna

 

Romeo

Romeo is the Italian form of Late Latin Romaeus which comes from Greek rhomaios meaning “Roman”, used in reference to a pilgrim traveling to Rome or someone who was a former citizen of Rome. Probably the most famous bearer of this name is Romeo Montague from William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. It’s also a surname that originally referred to someone who came from Rome or who had made a pilgramage to Rome.

Origin: Greek

Variants:

  • Romaeus (Late Latin)
  • Romanus (Late Latin)
  • Romano (Italian)
  • Romolo (Italian)
  • Roman (Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German)
  • Roma (Russian diminutive of Roman)
  • Romain (French)
  • Román (Spanish, Hungarian)
  • Romà (Catalan)
  • Romão (Portuguese)
  • Romulus (Latin)

 

Female forms:

  • Romana (Italian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Late Roman)
  • Romola (Italian)
  • Romaine (French)
  • Romane (French)
  • Romayne (English)
  • Romána (Hungarian)

 

Libelle

Libelle is the German and Dutch word for “dragonfly” as well as the French word (spelled libellé) meaning “wording”; it was used to refer to a type of political pamphlet or book in which it attacked important figures using slander, whether they were real or not, which is where the English word libel comes form. Libelle derive from Latin libellus, a diminutive of liber (book) so essentially meaning “little book”.

Origin: German, Dutch, Latin

 

Gladio

Gladio is the Italian word for Gladius, the Latin word for “sword” and referring to a type of shortsword used by Ancient Roman soldiers. Gladius might possibly be derived from Gaulish *kladyos (sword) from a Proto-Indo-European root word meaning “to break, beat”. Although I don’t believe Gladio has ever been used as a boy’s name before, I think it would be a rather nice name to give. Fun fact: gladiolus is the name of a genus of flowers, the name being a dimininutive of gladius so essentially meaning “little sword”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Gladius (Latin)
  • Gladiolus

 

Zakia

Zakia is an Arabic female name with two possible meanings depending on the spelling used, such as زكية meaning “pure” or ذكيه ‎ meaning “intelligent”.

Origin: Arabic

 

Variants:

  • Zakiya
  • Zakiyya
  • Zakiah
  • Zakieh
  • Zakiyah
  • Zakiyyah

 

Male forms:

  • Zaki

 

 

زكية (pure)

ذكيه ‎ (intelligent)

Issachar

Issachar (pr. ee-sah-kahr; Forvo) comes from a Hebrew male name of uncertain etymology possibly meaning “man of hire” or “there is reward” from Hebrew shakhar (hire, wage, reward, recompense).

Origin: Hebrew

Variants:

  • Yissachar (Hebrew)
  • Yissakhar (Hebrew)

 

Tova

Tova is a Hebrew female name meaning “good”, though it’s also a Swedish variant of Tove, a modern form of Old Norse Tófa which is a short form of Old Norse Þórfríðr (or Thorfrither) meaning “Thor is beautiful” or “beautiful Thor” from Þórr/Thor (Thor) and fríðr (beautiful, beloved), Thor being the Norse god of thunder, strength, war and storms; his name fittingly means “thunder”.

Origin: Hebrew, Old Norse

Variants:

  • Tovah (Hebrew)
  • Tove (Swedish)
  • Tuva (Swedish, Norwegian)
  • Þórfríðr (Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Thorfrithr

 

Olin

Olin is a unisex name, a feminine form of Oline from Scandinavian male name Ole, the Danish and Norwegian masculine form of Olaf which comes from Old Norse Áleifr meaning “ancestor’s descendant” from Old Norse elements anu (ancestor) and leifr (descendant). Olin could also be the male form of Olina which also comes from the same source as Oline. Spelled Olenit’s the Russian word for “deer” as well as also possibly being a variat of Middle English holin, the word for holly.

As a surname, Olin could be from Germanic element odal meaning “heritage, fatherland”.

Origin: Old Norse, Russian, Middle English, Germanic

Female forms:

  • Oline (Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Finnish, Greenlandic)
  • Olina (Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Greenlandic, Finnish)

 

Male forms:

  • Ole (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Olaf (Danish, Norwegian, German, Dutch, Polish)
  • Olen