Apollon

Apollon is a Greek and French variant of Apollo, the name of the Greek god of prophecy, medicine, the sun, light, music, poetry, plague and disease, and one of the most important gods in both the Greek and Roman pantheon; and the twin brother of Artemis, the children of Leto and Zeus. Apollon is also a French surname. The origin …

Balthazar

Balthazar is a variant form of Belshazzar, a Babylonian male name meaning "may Bel protect the king" or "may Bel safeguard the king", Bel being a variant of Baal, a Canaanite god who was the chief god in Phoenician mythology and all across Mesopotamia; Baal was also used as an epithet for other gods in Near East mythology; the name …

Orion

Orion is the name of a legendary giant hunter in Greek mythology, the son of Poseidon and Euryale, the daughter of King Minos of Crete, and features in Homer's Odyssey in which Odysseus sees his shade in the underworld. Because of his father, Orion had the ability to walk on water. There are several stories regarding Orion and his adventures. Orion was a …

Shulamite

Shulamite is the name of a woman in the Song of Songs (also known as the Song of Solomon) in the Bible because she came from the village of Shunem; her real name is unknown. The Song of Songs is about two unnamed lovers and has some sexually suggestive dialogue within it. The woman is Shulamite, …

Leah

Leah is the name of the first wife of Jacob in the Old Testament, and the older sister of Rachel. The name itself is of uncertain meaning. It's often been interpreted as meaning "weary, languid, tired" or even "tender, soft, gentle", which could refer to someone who was gentle in manner. Leah has also been linked …

Polina

Polina is either a Slavic and Greek form of Paulina (the feminine form of Paulinus, a Roman cognomen meaning "small" or "humble" via Latin paulus (little, small) derived from a PIE root word) or it's a Russian diminutive of Apollinariya, the Russian feminine form of Apollinaris which derives from the name of the Greek god Apollo. The name is of uncertain etymology and …

Elam

Elam is a Hebrew male name either meaning "hidden" or "eternity, forever"; Elam also means "young (unmarried) man". Elam is also the name of an ancient civilization in what is now southwest Iran. The name itself comes from the Sumerian transliteration of elama or from Elamite haltamti which I've seen meaning "lord country", or perhaps from …

Sarra

Sarra is the Biblical Greek and Latin form of Sarah which comes from Hebrew meaning “lady, princess, noblewoman” via Hebrew root word sarar (to rule, to be princely) from sar (chief, ruler, prince, captain, chieftain, official) which seems to be a cognate of Akkadian šarru (king). Sarah seems to have been used as a title for royal women. Sarra is also an Italian surname, the …

Apollonia

Apollonia is the feminine form of Apollonios, an Ancient Greek name which derives from the name of the Greek god Apollo. His name is of uncertain etymology and meaning though the ancient Greeks often associated it with the Greek apollymi meaning “to destroy”. It’s also been associated with Doric apella “wall”, later referring to an assembly. Other possible theories regarding the name …

Aya

Aya is a female given name which has several possible origins. The first is that it's an Arabic name, a variant transcription of Ayah meaning "sign, token" and "verse" (such as the verses in the Quran), which derives from a Proto-Semitic root. Aya is also a Hebrew female name meaning "honey buzzard" though I've seen some sources …

Tiranna

Tiranna was the Akkadian and Sumerian name for the Vega star possibly meaning "life of heaven" or "rainbow". Tiranna is also an Italian word, the feminine singular form of tiranno derived from Ancient Greek turannos meaning "tyrant" or "tyrannical" which comes from an uncertain etymology though perhaps borrowed from a Lydian word or one of the other languages …

Zaqar

Zaqar is the name of the Mesopotamian god of dreams and the messenger of the god Sin (the god of the moon) who brought messages from him to mortal through their dreams. The name comes from Akkadian zakāru meaning "to speak", "to name", and "to swear". Origin: Akkadian Variants: Dzakar Zakar (also a Hebrew word meaning "to …