Fahima

Fahima is the feminine form of Fahim, an Arabic male name meaning “intelligent, scholar” though it also means “understanding, comprehension”.

Origin: Arabic

Variants:

  • Faheema (Arabic)
  • Fehime (Turkish)
  • Fahmida (Urdu)

 

Male forms:

  • Fahim (Arabic)
  • Faheem (Arabic)
  • Fehim (Turkish)

 

فهمة (Arabic)

 

Malika

Malika is an Arabic female name meaning “queen”, the feminine form of Malik (king).

Origin: Arabic

Variants:

  • Maleeka (English)
  • Melike (Turkish)

 

Male forms:

  • Malik (Arabic)
  • Malek (Arabic)
  • Melik (Turkish)

 

مالك (Arabic) Malik

 

Dalya, Dalia

Dalya is a variant transcription of Dalia, a Hebrew female name meaning “branch”, though Dalia is also an Arabic female name meaning “grape vine”.

Dalia is the name of the Lithuanian goddess of fate meaning “fate, luck” in Lithuanian from dalis (part, portion, share), as well as being a variant spelling and Spanish form of Dahliathe name of a flower named after Anders Dahl; Dahl is a surname that means “valley” from Old Norse dalr.

Origin: Hebrew, Arabic, Lithuanian, Old Norse

Variants:

  • Daliyah (Hebrew)

 

داليا (Arabic)

דַּלְיָה (Hebrew)

 

Esmeralda

Esmeralda is the Spanish and Portuguese word for “emerald”, also used as a given name. It comes from Old French esmeraude via Vulgar Latin (which is the common speech of Latin including different dialects) esmeralda, esmeraldus which comes from Ancient Greek smaragdos meaning “green gem”. That itself could come from a Semitic source such as Hebrew baraket or bareqeth meaning “emerald, shine” or Arabic barq “lightning”.

Origin: Hebrew, Arabic

Variants:

  • Esmeraude (Old French)
  • Emeraude (French)
  • Émeraude (French)
  • Emerald (English)

 

Veda

Veda is an Indian female name meaning “knowledge, understanding”, “true knowledge”, “knowledge of ritual” or “sacred knowledge, sacred lore” deriving from Sanskrit vetti (to know, to understand) whic comes from the root word vid (to know) from Proto-Indo-European root word *weyd (to see).

The Vedas are the oldest sacred texts of Hinduism. There are four Vedas: Rigveda, Yajurveda, Samaveda, and the Atharvaveda.

Veda also seems to be a Turkish word meaning “farewell, goodbye, parting” from Arabic wada (goodbye, farewell), though I don’t know it it’s ever used as a given name in Turkey.

Origin: Sanskrit, Arabic

 

वेद (Sanskrit)- Veda

వేద (Telugu)- Veda

ವೇದ (Kannada)- Veda

 

Jumal

Jumal is the name of the Estonian god of the sky; the name means “god” in Estonian and Finnish, likely borrowed from the Proto-Indo-Iranian *diyumna, a cognate of Sanskrit dyuman (heavenly, shining, radiant). Jumal has also been used as a generic word used to refer to a god as well as also being used for the Christian God. Another possible meaning of the name is “twins” or it could be related to Mordvinic jondol meaning “lightning”.

Jumal could also be a variant transcription of Jamal, an Arabic male name meaning “handsome, beauty”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-Iranian

Variants:

  • Jumala (Finnish
  • Jumo (Mari)

 

Zafir

Zafir is an Arabic male name, a variant spelling of Zafar meaning “victory, triumph, success”. It’s also a surname derived from the given name.

Spelled zafír (with the accent on the i), it becomes the Hungarian word for “sapphire”.

Origin: Arabic

Variants:

  • Zafeer
  • Zafar

 

Alita

Alita is a very rare name, possible a variant of Alethea, a Greek female name meaning “truth”. It could also be a variant spelling of Alida, the Dutch, Hungarian, and German diminutive of Adelaide meaning “noble kind, noble type” from Germanic elements adal (noble) and heid (kind, type, sort). It’s just as likely that Alita could be a short form of Adelita, also a Spanish diminutive of Adela meaning “noble”. It might also come from the Spanish word ala meaning “wing” deriving from Latin; Alita could be a variant form of the word, or it could be a diminutive of it meaning “little wing”.

Alita might also be a variant spelling of Alitta, which was the name given to the goddess Aphrodite in Arabia. According to the Greek historian Herodotus, the name likely derives from Al-Lat meaning “the goddess”, a pre-Islamic Arabian goddess.

It’s also possible that Alita is the feminine singular of alitus, which is the future passive participle of alō, a Latin word meaning “nourishment, sustenance, support” from Proto-Indo-European *h₂életi (grow, nourish).

Origin: Greek, Germanic, Proto-Indo-European, Arabic

Variants:

  • Alida (Dutch, Hungarian, German)
  • Alitta

 

Dean

Dean is from an English surname, either derived from Middle English dene meaning “valley” or else it’s an occupational surname meaning “dean”, referring to a person who was a dean or someone who worked for one, referring to an ecclesialtical head of a cathedral. It’s derived from Latin decanus meaning “chief of ten” in reference to someone who was in charge of ten people. A dean is the head of a college or university.

Dean could also be a variant spelling of Deen or Dīn, an Arabic male name meaning “religion”.

Origin: Latin, Arabic

Variants:

  • Deen (Arabic)
  • Dene (English)