Morna

Morna is the anglicized form of Muirne, an Irish female name meaning "festive, high-spirited" though I've also seen it listed as meaning "joy, affection". In Irish mythology, Muirne was the mother of Fionn mac Cumhail. She loved a man, Cumhall, from another tribe but her father forbade her marriage and so Cumhall abducted her. He was later killed in battle but … Continue reading Morna

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Grady

Grady comes from an Irish surname, the anglicized form of Ó Grádaigh meaning "descendant of Grádaigh", the latter a byname meaning "illustrious" or "noble". Origin: Irish Variants: Gradie (English)  

Idris

Idris is a male name with two different origins and meanings: it's a Welsh name meaning "ardent lord" from Welsh udd (lord, prince) and ris (ardent, enthusiastic, impulsive). In Welsh mythology, Idris Gawr (or Idris the Giant) was a legendary giant and magician who was likely based on a real person in seventh century Wales, and who gave his name … Continue reading Idris

Rohan

Rohan is an Indian male name meaning "ascending" from Sanskrit rohana. Rohan is also the name of a place in France though the exact origins behind the name is unknown. Rohan is also a surname, a variant form of Rowan, an Irish surname which is the anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of Ruadhán", the latter derived from Irish ruadh meaning "red", derived … Continue reading Rohan

Malduc

Malduc is the name of a powerful sorcerer in the Arthurian legends who helped Arthur get Guinevere back after she was kidnapped. The meaning of the name is uncertain though it may be linked to Máel Máedóc meaning "disciple of Máedóc", Máedóc perhaps being a diminutive of Aodh meaning "my little Aodh", the latter derived from Áed meaning "fire" while Máel means "servant, devout follower" when combined with a … Continue reading Malduc

Aoife

Aoife (pr. ee-fa or ee-va) is an Irish female name meaning "beauty, radiant" from Irish aoibh (beauty, form; smile, pleasant expression). In Irish mythology, Aoife is the name of a warrior queen who bore the great hero Cú Chulainn a son named Connla, whom Cú Chulainn accidentally kills. Another Aoife is the second wife of King Lir and the stepmother of his kids, Aodh, … Continue reading Aoife

Kieran

Kieran is the anglicized form of Ciarán, meaning "black, dark" from Irish Ciar with the diminutive suffix -an, so the name essentially means "little dark one", likely in reference to someone who had dark hair. Origin: Irish Variants: Ciarán (Irish) Ciaran (Irish, English) Ciar (Irish) Kieron (Irish, English) Keiren (Irish) Kyran (Irish, English) Keiran (English) Kiaran (English)   Female … Continue reading Kieran

Carey

Carey is an English unisex name, derived from Irish surname Ó Ciardha meaning "descendant of Ciardha", the latter a given name derived from Irish ciar meaning "black" though it may also be derived from Welsh caer meaning "fort, castle", making it a variant form of Carew meaning "fort on the hill". Carey may also be derived from Irish car (love) which comes from Proto-Celtic *kareti (to … Continue reading Carey

Neve

Neve is an anglicized form of Niamh, an Irish female name meaning "bright" or "radiant". In Irish myth, Niamh is the daughter of the sea god Manannán. She was the lover of Oisin, a great bard and poet and the son of  Fionn mac Cumhaill (Finn MacCool) who went with her to the land of Tír na nÓg (the Land of Youth). Time passed differently … Continue reading Neve

Morien

Morien is an old Welsh name, a cognate of Muirgen, made up from Celtic elements *mori- (sea) and *geno- (born). In the Arthurian legends, Morien is the son of Agrovale, one of the knights of the Round Table. Traveling in Moorish lands, he meets a beautiful princess whom he slept with and had a son, Morien, though Agrovale leaves before … Continue reading Morien