Jerrin

Jerrin seems to be an invented name, either a creative spin on Jeremiah, a Hebrew male name meaning “Yahweh has uplifted” or “Yahweh will raise”, or it could be a combination of names Jeremiah and Darren (either an anglicized form of Irish Dara meaning “oak tree” or a variant of Darrell, from French surname D’Airelle meaning “of Airelle”), or Jared (from Hebrew meaning “descent”) and Darren. It’s just as likely that Jerrin is a variant spelling of Jaron, either a variant transcription of Yaron, Hebrew male name meaning “to sing, to shout”, or which also happens to be another spelling of Jerrin.

Origin: English, Hebrew, Irish, French

Variants:

  • Jerin (English)
  • Jerron (English)
  • Jeron (English)
  • Jerren (English)
  • Jerryn (English)
  • Jaron (Hebrew, English)

Ellison

Ellison comes from a patrynomic surname meaning “son of Ellis”, Ellis being a medieval form of Elijah, a Hebrew male name meaning “my God is Yahweh”. Ellison may also be a variant form of Elisedd, a Welsh male given name meaning “kind, benevolent” from Welsh elus. Ellison seems to be very popular as a girl’s name.

Origin: Hebrew, Welsh

Variants:

  • Ellis (English)
  • Elisedd (Welsh)

 

Lennox

Lennox comes from a surname via a place name in Scotland meaning “place of the elms” or “elm field” from Gaelic Leamhnachd made up of Gaelic elements leamhan (elm) and the locational suffix ach (field), likely referring to a place near elm trees. It was first anglicized as Leuenaichs and later as Levanaux and Levenex before finally becomming Lennox.

Origin: Gaelic

Variants:

  • Lenox (English)
  • Lenix (English)
  • Lennix (English)

 

Albion

Albion was once the earliest known name of what is now Great Britain and is sometimes still used as a poetic name for it. It’s related to Latin albus meaning “white”, in reference to the White Cliffs of Dover, though I’ve also seen it related to Common Celtic *albiyo “white; upper world” as opposed to the underworld. It’s also been linked to Proto-Indo-European *alb meaning “mountain”.

Origin: Latin, Celtic, Proto-Indo–European

Variants:

  • Albiona (f)

Perry

Perry is a nickname for Peregrine, from Latin Peregrinus meaning “traveler”, or Percival, likely based on Welsh Peredur meaning “hard spear” though the spelling of the name was altered to resemble Old French percer val “to pierce the valley”. Perry is also an English surname which comes from Middle English perrie meaning “pear tree”, referring to someone who lived near a pear tree. As a Welsh patrynomic surname it comes from ap Herry meaning “son of Herry”, the latter a medieval English form of Henry meaning “home ruler”. Spelled Perriit’s an Italian surname derived from given name Peter meaning “stone”.

Origin: Latin, Welsh, Old French, Greek

Variants:

  • Peregrine
  • Percival
  • Perri (u)
  • Peri (u)
  • Perrie (u)

 

Hedwin

Hedwin could be a variant spelling of Heddwyn, a Welsh male name meaning “blessed peace” or “fair, white peace” from Welsh elements hedd (peace) and gwyn (white, fair, blessed). Hedwin has also been used as a female name, perhaps from a Germanic name meaning “battle bliss” or “battle joy” from Germanic element hadu (battle) and Anglo-Saxon wynn (joy, bliss). It could also simply be a variant of Hedwig meaning “battle war”.

Origin: Welsh, Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Heddwen (Welsh female form of Heddwyn).

 

Lukan

Lukan is a variant spelling of Lucan, derived from Roman Lucanus meaning “from Lucania”, referring to someone who came from the city of Lucania located in southern Italy. The name seems to be derived from Ancient Greek *leukos meaning “white” and “bright, shining”, or it could be derived from Latin lucus meaning “sacred wood” or “sacred grove” (lucus is also a cognate of lucere meaning “shining, bright” from the same root word as *leukos). Lucan is also a place name in Ireland, deriving its name from Gaelic Leamhcán meaning “place of the elms” from leamhán (elm) and ceann (headland, point).

As well as being a given name, Lukan is also a surname which seems to be derived from the given name. Lucan is also the name of a character in the Arthurian legend, a knight of the Round Table, as well as Butler of the royal court.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Latin, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Lucan (English, Ancient Roman)
  • Lucanus (Ancient Roman)
  • Loukanos (Ancient Greek)

 

Clary

Clary is the name of a species of herbs in the genus Salvia, Salvia sclarea, also known as the clary sage (and clear eye since it was used to clear up one’s eyesight), which when distilled into oil has been used as a seasoning, in perfumes, and used to help with eye problems, good for digestion and the kidneys as well as helping women during their menstrual cycles, and used in aromatherapy to help with anxiety and stress. Though the etymology behind the name is uncertain, it has been linked to Latin clarus meaning “clear, bright, famous”. Clary is also a surname, from Irish surname McClary/McCleary, the Anglicized form of Mac Cleirich meaning “son of the cleric”, though it might also come from Latin clarus.

Clary can also be used as a nickname for Clarissa, which is also derived from Latin clarus.

Origin: Latin, Gaelic

 

Gareth

Gareth is the name of one of the Knights of the Round Table in the Arthurian legends, the son of Lot and Morgause, Arthur’s older half-sister, which makes him Arthur’s nephew. The name first appeared in Thomas Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur, based on the name Gahariet, an Old French form of the name. The etymology behind the name is uncertain though it has been linked to Welsh gwaredd meaning “gentleness”. It could also be connected to another name, Geraint, the Welsh form of Latin Gerontius meaning “old man” from Greek geron. Other possible meanings I’ve come across is that it might be from Welsh Gweir “grass”, “hay”, “collar”, “loop” or “bend” or Gweirydd “Gweir + lord”, or that it could be from Old Welsh gwrhyt “valor”.

Origin: Welsh, Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Gahariet (Medieval French)
  • Gaharet
  • Gahareth
  • Gariet