Terry

Terry is an English unisex name originally used as a diminutive of Terence (which comes from Roman family name Terentius which is of uncertain meaning though it could be derived from Latin terens meaning “rubbing, wearing away” from Latin terere (to rub, to wear out) though it might also be related to Sabine terenus meaning “soft”) or Theresa ( comes from Greek Therasia, the name of an island (the name is of uncertain meaning but has been linked to several possible meanings such as Greek theros “summer”, therizo “to harvest, to reap”, ther “wild beast”, or therao “to hunt”).

As an surname, however, Terry comes from medieval given name Thierry, the Norman French form of Theodoric meaning “ruler of the people” from Germanic elements theud (people) and ric (power); it could also be an anglicized form of Gaelic surname Mac Toirdhealbhaigh meaning “son of Toirdhealbhach”, the latter being a personal given name meaning “one who is like Thor” or “one who is like thunder”; or it’s a French surname deirved from Occitan terrin meaning “earthenware vessel, earthenware vase”, an occupational surname for a potter, which comes from Latin terra (earth).

Origin: Latin, Greek, Germanic, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Terrie
  • Terri
  • Teri

 

Rayne

Rayne seems to be a variant spelling of Rain on the surface which comes from Old English regn (rain) which might possibly come from Proto-Indo-European *hreg- meaning “moist, wet”. It could also be derived from Germanic element ragin meaning “counsel” and used as a short form of names beginning with the element such as Raymond or Rainer (meaning “advice army”). Rayne could also be a medieval female name derived from Old French reine meaning “queen” from Latin regina; it could also be derived from Old French raine meaning “frog”, derived from Latin rana, as well as also coming from a Scottish place name in Aberdeenshire meaning “strip of land”. Rayne is also a surname.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Germanic, Latin, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Raine (English, Germanic)
  • Rain (English)
  • Reine (French) f
  • Rayna
  • Reina

 

Arlo

Arlo is an English male name of uncertain meaning. It was used by English poet Edmund Spenser for his epic poem The Faerie Queen (1590-1596) as the name of a place called Arlo Hill which he might have based on a real place name, Aherlow, a Gaelic name meaning “lowland between two high lands” or “between two highlands”. I’ve also seen it listed as being a variant form of Harlow, a surname derived from a place name meaning “rock hill” or “army hill”. It might also be a variant of Carlo, the Italian form of Charles derived from Germanic name Karl meaning “man”. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, connoting the idea of a “free man”.

Several sites have also listed the name as meaning “barberry tree” in Spanish but when I looked it up bérbero was the Spanish word for barberry, not Arlo, so I’m not sure whether it was an older Spanish form of the name or whether it comes from a different dialect.

Origin: Gaelic, Old English, Germanic

Variants:

  • Arlow (English)
  • Arlowe (English)

Gilroy

Gilroy comes from a surname, the anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Ruaidh meaning “son of the red-haired youth” or it could be derived from Mac Giolla Rí meaning “son of the king’s servant”.

Origin: Gaelic

 

 

Tyrese

Tyrese is a masculine given name, a modern American name which could be a combination of Ty (a short form of names such as Tyler, Tyrone, and Tyson) and Reese, the Anglicized form of Welsh name Rhys meaning “ardor”, “enthusiasm”, “splendor, glory”. It could also be an elaborated form of Tyree, a variant form of McIntyre, a Gaelic surname meaning “son of the craftsman” or “son of the carpenter”.

Origin: Gaelic, Welsh, English

Variants:

  • Tyreese (English)

 

Kelly

Kelly comes from a surname, an anglicized form of Ó Ceallaigh meaning “descendant of Ceallach”, Ceallach being an Irish given name of uncertain meaning though possible meanings attributed to it are “bright-headed” or perhaps coming from Irish ceallach “war, strife, contention” or Irish ceall meaning “church”. Kelly could also be derived from Scottish Gaelic coille meaning “wooded area” and “grove, forest, woodland”.

Origin: Gaelic

Female forms:

  • Kelley
  • Kelli
  • Kellie
  • Kelleigh

 

Male forms:

  • Kelley
  • Ceallach (Irish)
  • Ceallagh (Irish)
  • Ceallachán (Irish)

 

Lennox

Lennox comes from a surname via a place name in Scotland meaning “place of the elms” or “elm field” from Gaelic Leamhnachd made up of Gaelic elements leamhan (elm) and the locational suffix ach (field), likely referring to a place near elm trees. It was first anglicized as Leuenaichs and later as Levanaux and Levenex before finally becomming Lennox.

Origin: Gaelic

Variants:

  • Lenox (English)
  • Lenix (English)
  • Lennix (English)

 

Lukan

Lukan is a variant spelling of Lucan, derived from Roman Lucanus meaning “from Lucania”, referring to someone who came from the city of Lucania located in southern Italy. The name seems to be derived from Ancient Greek *leukos meaning “white” and “bright, shining”, or it could be derived from Latin lucus meaning “sacred wood” or “sacred grove” (lucus is also a cognate of lucere meaning “shining, bright” from the same root word as *leukos). Lucan is also a place name in Ireland, deriving its name from Gaelic Leamhcán meaning “place of the elms” from leamhán (elm) and ceann (headland, point).

As well as being a given name, Lukan is also a surname which seems to be derived from the given name. Lucan is also the name of a character in the Arthurian legend, a knight of the Round Table, as well as Butler of the royal court.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Latin, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Lucan (English, Ancient Roman)
  • Lucanus (Ancient Roman)
  • Loukanos (Ancient Greek)

 

Clary

Clary is the name of a species of herbs in the genus Salvia, Salvia sclarea, also known as the clary sage (and clear eye since it was used to clear up one’s eyesight), which when distilled into oil has been used as a seasoning, in perfumes, and used to help with eye problems, good for digestion and the kidneys as well as helping women during their menstrual cycles, and used in aromatherapy to help with anxiety and stress. Though the etymology behind the name is uncertain, it has been linked to Latin clarus meaning “clear, bright, famous”. Clary is also a surname, from Irish surname McClary/McCleary, the Anglicized form of Mac Cleirich meaning “son of the cleric”, though it might also come from Latin clarus.

Clary can also be used as a nickname for Clarissa, which is also derived from Latin clarus.

Origin: Latin, Gaelic