Lennox

Lennox comes from a surname via a place name in Scotland meaning “place of the elms” or “elm field” from Gaelic Leamhnachd made up of Gaelic elements leamhan (elm) and the locational suffix ach (field), likely referring to a place near elm trees. It was first anglicized as Leuenaichs and later as Levanaux and Levenex before finally becomming Lennox.

Origin: Gaelic

Variants:

  • Lenox (English)
  • Lenix (English)
  • Lennix (English)

 

Lukan

Lukan is a variant spelling of Lucan, derived from Roman Lucanus meaning “from Lucania”, referring to someone who came from the city of Lucania located in southern Italy. The name seems to be derived from Ancient Greek *leukos meaning “white” and “bright, shining”, or it could be derived from Latin lucus meaning “sacred wood” or “sacred grove” (lucus is also a cognate of lucere meaning “shining, bright” from the same root word as *leukos). Lucan is also a place name in Ireland, deriving its name from Gaelic Leamhcán meaning “place of the elms” from leamhán (elm) and ceann (headland, point).

As well as being a given name, Lukan is also a surname which seems to be derived from the given name. Lucan is also the name of a character in the Arthurian legend, a knight of the Round Table, as well as Butler of the royal court.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Latin, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Lucan (English, Ancient Roman)
  • Lucanus (Ancient Roman)
  • Loukanos (Ancient Greek)

 

Clary

Clary is the name of a species of herbs in the genus Salvia, Salvia sclarea, also known as the clary sage (and clear eye since it was used to clear up one’s eyesight), which when distilled into oil has been used as a seasoning, in perfumes, and used to help with eye problems, good for digestion and the kidneys as well as helping women during their menstrual cycles, and used in aromatherapy to help with anxiety and stress. Though the etymology behind the name is uncertain, it has been linked to Latin clarus meaning “clear, bright, famous”. Clary is also a surname, from Irish surname McClary/McCleary, the Anglicized form of Mac Cleirich meaning “son of the cleric”, though it might also come from Latin clarus.

Clary can also be used as a nickname for Clarissa, which is also derived from Latin clarus.

Origin: Latin, Gaelic

 

Reilly, Riley

 

Reilly comes from an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of Gaelic surname  Ó Raghallaigh meaning “descendent of Raghailleach”, the latter a name of unknown meaning. Although Riley is another spelling of name, it also has a different source, from an English place name meaning “rye clearing” composed of Old English elements ryge (rye) and leah (clearing, meadow).

Origin: Gaelic, Old English

Variants:

  • Ryley
  • Rylee
  • Ryleigh
  • Rylie

 

Gillian

Gillian is the Medieval feminine form of Julian, which comes from the Roman family name Julius which is either possibly derived from Latin ioulos meaning “downy-bearded” or it could be related to the Roman god Jupiter, which is made up of Indo-European *Dyeu-pater, dyeus meaning “shine” or “sky” and pater meaning “father”.

Gillian is also a surname, the Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Gileáin meaning “son of Gileán”, the latter derived from personal name Gealán, a diminutive of geal meaning “bright, white”.

The name Gillian has two possible pronunciations, either with a hard like Gilbert, or like a j, like Julian.

Origin: Latin, Indo-European, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Jillian (English)

 

Maxwell

Maxwell comes from a Scottish surname meaning “Mack’s stream”, Mack possibly being a form of Magnus, a given name derived from Latin meaning “great”, combined with Old English wella (stream). Mack could also be derived from Gaelic mac (son); Macca might also be derived from Old Norse makr “easy to deal with”.

Nicknames: Max

Origin: Latin, Gaelic

Shae

Shae is a variant spelling of Shea, which comes from O’Shea, which is the anglicized form of Irish surname Ó Séaghdha meaning “descendant of Séaghdha”, Séaghdha being a male given name of uncertain meaning though I’ve seen several possible meanings listed for it such as “admirable” or “hawk-like”; “esteem” and “regard”; or “fine, fortunate”.

Origin: Gaelic

Variants:

  • Shay
  • Shaye
  • Shea
  • Séaghdha (Irish)

 

Glenn

Glenn comes from a Scottish surname meaning “valley” from Gaelic gleann, originally used to refer to someone who lived near a valley.

Origin: Gaelic

Variants:

  • Glen (English, Scottish)
  • Glyn (Welsh)
  • Glynn (Welsh)

 

Female forms:

  • Glenna (English, Scottish)
  • Glenne (English)