Jerrin

Jerrin seems to be an invented name, either a creative spin on Jeremiah, a Hebrew male name meaning “Yahweh has uplifted” or “Yahweh will raise”, or it could be a combination of names Jeremiah and Darren (either an anglicized form of Irish Dara meaning “oak tree” or a variant of Darrell, from French surname D’Airelle meaning “of Airelle”), or Jared (from Hebrew meaning “descent”) and Darren. It’s just as likely that Jerrin is a variant spelling of Jaron, either a variant transcription of Yaron, Hebrew male name meaning “to sing, to shout”, or which also happens to be another spelling of Jerrin.

Origin: English, Hebrew, Irish, French

Variants:

  • Jerin (English)
  • Jerron (English)
  • Jeron (English)
  • Jerren (English)
  • Jerryn (English)
  • Jaron (Hebrew, English)

Nola

Nola is a short form of Finola, an Anglicized form of Fionnuala meaning “white shoulder” from Irish elements fionn (white, fair) and guala (shoulder). It could also be a nickname for Magnolia, a flower named after French botanist Pierre Magnol; the closest I could find about the name is that it might possibly be a diminutive of given name Magnus, a Latin name meaning “great”.

Nola could also be a feminine form of Nolan, itself derived from Irish surname Ó Nualláin meaning “descendant of Nuallán”, Nuallán meaning “noble, famous”.

Nola is also a town in Campania, Italy, and one that seems to have a long history. It was fought over for control by Hannibal and the Romans three times when the former invaded Italy and failed. I couldn’t find what the etymology behind the name is but it might have derived its name from Latin nola meaning “bell” since the first use of bells for Church services began there.

Origin: Irish, Latin

Variants:

  • Nuala (Irish)
  • Nolene (English)

 

Male forms:

  • Nolan (English, Irish)

 

Etain

Etain is the Anglicized form of Étaín, an Irish female name. It seems likely it derives from Old Irish ét meaning “jealousy, passion, zeal”. In Irish mythology, Étaín is the lover of Midir, the son of the Dagda, but she was turned into a water, a worm, and a butterfly (or a fly in some versions) by his jealous wife Fuamnach. Étaín has also been associated as being a sun and horse goddess.

It can be pronounced as e-tane or ay-teen (I prefer the former).

Origin: Irish

Variants:

  • Étaín (Irish)
  • Etaoin (Modern Irish)
  • Éadaoin (Modern Irish)
  • Édaín (Irish)
  • Eadan (Modern Irish)
  • Edana (Latin)
  • Aideen (English, Irish)

 

Kiera

Kiera is a variant spelling of Kira which is also another spelling of Ciara, the feminine form of Ciar, an Irish masculine name meaning “black”, referring to someone who had black hair or had a darker complexion.

Origin: Irish

Variants:

  • Kira
  • Ciara
  • Kiara
  • Kiarra
  • Keara
  • Kyra

 

Aiden

Origin: Irish

Meaning: Aiden is a variant spelling of Aidan, which is the Anglicized form of Aodhán from Old Irish Áedán, a diminutive of Áed (or Aodh) with the diminutive suffix -an meaning “fire” or “fiery” so Aiden would mean “little fire” or “little fiery one”.

In Irish mythology Aodh (pronounced ae like hay) is one of the sons of Lir, the twin brother of Fionnuala, and brother of Conn and Fiachra (also twins) who were cursed to be swans for 900 years by their jealous stepmother.

Variants:

  • Aidan (Irish, Scottish, English)
  • Aden (English)
  • Aydan (English)
  • Ayden (English)
  • Aedan (English, Irish)
  • Edan (Irish, Scottish)
  • Áed (Ancient Irish)
  • Áedán (Ancient Irish)
  • Áedh (Ancient Irish)
  • Aodh (Irish, Scottish)
  • Aodhán (Irish, Scottish)
  • Aodhagán (Irish, Scottish)
  • Iagan (Scottish)