Anna-Maria

Anna-Maria is a female given name, a combination of Anna and Maria:

  • Anna is the Latinate form of Hannah which comes from the Hebrew name Channah meaning “grace” or “favor”;
  • Maria comes from the Hebrew female name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian source either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr“love”. Maria is also the feminine form of Marius, a Roman family name which could be derived from Latin mas meaning “male” or Latin mare meaning “sea”. It could also be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart of the Greek god Ares), a name of uncertain etymology though it’s possible that Mars was derived from an older source, perhaps from from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture) of unknown meaning. Mars could also be the contracted form of an older name, Mavors (or Mavort) which could come from Latin verb mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn), essentially meaning “turner of the battle”. Mars could also be derived from the same  Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”.

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Etruscan, Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Annamaria (Italian, English)
  • Annamária (Hungarian)
  • Annemarie (Dutch, German)
  • Annmarie (English)

 

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Suzanne

Suzanne is the French form of Susanna, the Greek form of Hebrew name Shoshannah which means “lily”; it also means “rose” in modern Hebrew. It may ultimately be derived from Egyptian sšn meaning “lotus”.

Nicknames: Suzie/Suzy

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian

Variants:

  • Susanna (Italian, Swedish, Finnish, Russian, Dutch, English, Greek)
  • Sousanna (Greek)
  • Susannah (English)
  • Shoshannah (Hebrew)
  • Shoshana (Hebrew)
  • Sawsan (Arabic)
  • Suzana (Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Portuguese Brazilian)
  • Susana (Portuguese, Spanish)
  • Zuzana (Czech, Slovak)
  • Zuzanna (Polish, Latvian)
  • Susanne (German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian)
  • Susann (German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian)
  • Sanna (Swedish, Finnish)
  • Zane (Latvian)
  • Huhana (Maori)
  • Syuzanna (Russian)
  • Susan (English)

 

Mary

Mary is the English form of Hebrew female name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian source either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr “love”.

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian

Variants:

  • Maree (English)
  • Maria (Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian)
  • Marie (French, Czech, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch)
  • Mari (Welsh, Breton, Estonian, Finnish, Scandinavian)
  • Mariam (Arabic, Georgian, Armenian)
  • Maryam (Arabic, Persian)
  • Mariami (Georgian)
  • Miriam (Hebrew, English, German)

 

Jaspera

Jaspera is the feminine form of Jasper, a variant of Gaspar or Caspar which comes from a Persian name possibly meaning “treasurer” or “keeper of treasure”. It was one of the names of the Three Magi who visited baby Jesus. Jasper is also the name of a variety of an opaque variety of quartz composed of red, yellow, brown or green colors. The name comes from Old French jaspre via Latin iaspidem, a nominative form of Greek iaspis meaning “jasper” possibly borrowed from an oriental language- comparable to Hebrew yashpeh and Akkadian yashupu which may be derived from an Egyptian source or a Persian one.

Origin: Persian, Ancient Egyptian

Variants:

  • Jasperine
  • Jasperina

 

Male forms:

  • Jasper (English, Dutch)
  • Casper (Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)
  • Kasper (Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian)
  • Kaspar (German)
  • Caspar (Latin)
  • Gaspar (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Jesper (Danish, English)
  • Gaspard (French)
  • Gáspár (Hungarian)
  • Gaspare (Italian)
  • Gasparo (Italian)
  • Kaspars (Latvian)
  • Kasparas (Lithuanian)
  • Kacper (Polish)
  • Gašper (Slovene)

 

Rie

Rie (pr. ree-eh in Japanese; Forvo) is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used. Some possible meanings are: 理恵 “logic, reason + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 利恵 “profit, advantage, benefit + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 梨絵 “pear tree + picture, painting, drawing, sketch”; 理江 “logic, reason + inlet, bay, creek”; 理絵 “logic, reason +picture, painting, drawing, sketch”; 里枝 “village, hometown + bough, branch limb, twig”; 梨恵 “pear tree + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 里依 “village, hometown + reliant, depend on, consequently, therefore, due to”. There are likely other meanings depending on the kanji used.

Rie is also a Dutch female name (pr. rhee), used as a nickname for Hendrika, the feminine form of Hendrik, the Dutch and Estonian form of Henry which comes from a Germanic name meaning “home ruler”; and Marie, which comes from Maria, the Latin form of Hebrew name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr “love”. Rie has also been used as a male nickname for Henri, the French male form of Henry.

Spelled ríe, it’s the Spanish verb of ríer meaning “to laugh” which comes from Latin rīdēre (to laugh).

Origin: Japanese, Ancient Germanic, Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Latin

 

 

Phineas, Phineus

Phineas is a male name of uncertain meaning and etymology. It’s been linked to Hebrew meaning “serpent’s mouth” or “oracle”, as well as Ancient Egyptian meaning “the Nubian”. Spelled Phineus, it’s a Greek name borne by several figures in Greek mythology. The most notable bearer is a king of Thrace who features in the Argonautica, a Greek epic poem written about Jason and the Argonauts. This Phineus is either the son of Agenor or Poseidon, god of the sea, who had the gift of foresight and was blinded because he revealed too much of the gods’ plans (though there are different versions of how he became blind). The Argonauts came upon him on an island and agreed to help them on their voyage if they helped him get rid of the Harpies that were constanty harassing him by eating his food everytime he tried to eat. The meaning behind the name is unknown as well, though I’ve seen it listed as possibly meaning “vulture” or it might be composed from Greek elements iphios (strong, stout) and noûs (mind, reason, understanding) so essentially meaning “strong mind” or “strong understanding”.

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Phinehas (Biblical)
  • Phinees (Biblical Greek)
  • Pinchas (Hebrew)
  • Finees (Biblical Latin)

 

Female forms:

  • Phinea

 

Mia

Mia was originally used as a diminutive of Maria, the Latin form of Mary which ultimately comes from Hebrew female name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr “love”. Mia could also be a nickname for names such as Amelia, Emily, and Emilia though it can also be used as a given name.

Mia is also a Japanese female name. The first part of the kanji 未 (mi) refers to the eighth sign of the Chinese zodiac, the goat, or it could mean “not yet, un-“, or “future”while the second kanji (a) means “Asia; rank next; come after”. There could be other meanings depending on the kanji used. Mia is also an Italian word meaning “my” or “mine”.

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Japanese

Variants:

  • Miya (English, Japanese)

 

Haroun

Haroun is the Arabic form of Aaron, possibly meaning “high mountain”, “bright” or “exalted”, though the etymology behind the name is uncertain. It seems more likely that it comes from an Egyptian origin whose meaning has long since been lost. However, according to Wiktionary, it’s likely related to an Ancient Egyptian aha rw meaning “warrior lion” although considering it’s the only source I’ve found that lists it so, I don’t know how accurate that is. In fact I’m almost positive it’s not an accurate etymology, but it would be so cool if it were. Haroun is also a surname deriving from the given name.

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian

Variants:

  • Harun (Arabic, Turkish, Bosnian)
  • Haroon (Urdu, Arabic)
  • Aaron (English, Hebrew)
  • Arron (English)
  • Aaren (English)
  • Aerin (English)
  • Aron (Polish, Croatian, Scandinavian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic)
  • Aarón (Spanish)
  • Áron (Hungarian)

 

Mina

Mina is an Indian female name meaning “fish” in Sanskrit, as well as used as the Sanskrit term for the constellation Pisces; Minali is a variant of the name meaning “fish catcher”. It’s also a short form of Wilhelmina, the feminine form of Wilhelm, a German cognate of William meaning “wilfull protection” or “desiring protection” from Germanic elements wil (will, desire) and helm (helmet, protection). Mina is also a Japanese female name with various meanings depending on the kanji used, made up of Japanese elements mi 美 (beauty, beautiful), 未 (have not come, future), 実 (reality, truth); and na 奈 (apple tree, what),那 (what), 菜 (vegetables, greens), 和 (harmony), 愛 (love, affection); and likely other meanings.

Mina is also a Persian female name meaning “enamel, glaze” or “lapis lazuli”, as well as being the Pashto word for “love”, as well as also being the Arabic word for “port”. Mina is also a Korean female name written with Hangul (Korean alphabet) 미나 with various meanings depending on the hanja (Korean name for Chinese characters) used to write out the syllables. One such meaning for  (mi) is “beauty” (), “small” (), “not” (未), “rice” (米), “name of a mountain” (嵋), while 나 (na) means “I” in first person singular. Written with the hangul 민아 with various meanings depending on the hanja used 민 (min) “keen, sensitive” (敏), “jade” (珉), “jade” (), “heaven” (旻); and 아 (a): “elegant, neat, tidy” (雅), “good, beautiful” (娥), “oh, ah” (娥); and other meanings.

As well as being a female name, Mina is also an Egyptian Arabic male name which seems to come from Menes, the Greek form of an Ancient Egyptian pharaoh which seems to mean “He who endures” from Egyptian verb mnj and has also been linked to Memphis, the name of an ancient city in Egypt which is the Ancient Greek form of Egyptian Men-nefer meaning “enduring and beautiful” from mn (enduring) and nfr (beautiful). Menes, the first pharoah of Egypt who united Lower and Upper Egypt into one kingdom; his name is believed to have been an epithet rather than an actual name of a person long since forgotten.

Mina is also a surname as well as being a given name, derived from any place name called Mina, or from Portuguese and Spanish mina meaning “mine”, likely referring to a place where a mine was located. It could also be a variant form of Minas derived from Greek given name Menas from Menes, or from Arabic given name Minnah meanin “gift, charity, good deed”.

Origin: Sanskrit, German, Japanese, Persian, Korean, Ancient Egyptian

 

Variants:

  • Meena (Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil)
  • Mi-na (Korean)
  • Mi-nah (Korean)
  • Minali (Indian, Hindi)

 

Potiphar

Potiphar the name of a wealthy Egyptian who served as the captain of palace guard under the Pharoah’s rule according to the Book of Genesis. He bought Joseph and made him the head of the household slaves. However, Potiphar’s wife was interested in Joseph and when her attempts to seduce him failed she accused him of trying to rape her and was thrown into prison, though he later got out when his ability to interpret dreams reached the Pharoah’s notice. Potipher’s name comes from Ancient Egyptian meaning “he whom Ra gave”.

Origin: Ancient Egyptian

Variants:

  • Potiphera (Ancient Egyptian)
  • Potifar (Ancient Egyptian)