Olin

Olin is a unisex name, a feminine form of Oline from Scandinavian male name Ole, the Danish and Norwegian masculine form of Olaf which comes from Old Norse Áleifr meaning “ancestor’s descendant” from Old Norse elements anu (ancestor) and leifr (descendant). Olin could also be the male form of Olina which also comes from the same source as Oline. Spelled Olenit’s the Russian word for “deer” as well as also possibly being a variat of Middle English holin, the word for holly.

As a surname, Olin could be from Germanic element odal meaning “heritage, fatherland”.

Origin: Old Norse, Russian, Middle English, Germanic

Female forms:

  • Oline (Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Finnish, Greenlandic)
  • Olina (Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Greenlandic, Finnish)

 

Male forms:

  • Ole (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Olaf (Danish, Norwegian, German, Dutch, Polish)
  • Olen

 

Ashton

Ashton comes from an English surname derived from a place name meaning “ash tree town”, composed from Old English elements aesc (ash tree) and tun (enclosure, settlement).

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Asheton

 

Wynstan

Wynstan is a variant spelling of Wynnstan, an Old English name meaning “joy stone” from elements wynn (joy) and stan (stone). It could also be a variant spelling of Winston, which could either be derived from Wynnstan, or else it derives from the name of a town made up from Old English wine/win (friend) and tun (settlement) meaning “friend’s settlement” or “Wine’s settlement”, Wine being a personal given name from Old English win/wine. It’s also a surname derived from the given name.

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Wynnstan (Anglo-Saxon)

 

Hamilton

Hamilton comes from a surname derived from the name of a town that no longer exists in Leicestershire, England. It means “crooked hill” from Old English hamel (crooked, mutilated) and dun (hill).

Origin: Old English

 

 

Arlo

Arlo is an English male name of uncertain meaning. It was used by English poet Edmund Spenser for his epic poem The Faerie Queen (1590-1596) as the name of a place called Arlo Hill which he might have based on a real place name, Aherlow, a Gaelic name meaning “lowland between two high lands” or “between two highlands”. I’ve also seen it listed as being a variant form of Harlow, a surname derived from a place name meaning “rock hill” or “army hill”. It might also be a variant of Carlo, the Italian form of Charles derived from Germanic name Karl meaning “man”. It was originally used to refer to men who were not thralls or or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society, connoting the idea of a “free man”.

Several sites have also listed the name as meaning “barberry tree” in Spanish but when I looked it up bérbero was the Spanish word for barberry, not Arlo, so I’m not sure whether it was an older Spanish form of the name or whether it comes from a different dialect.

Origin: Gaelic, Old English, Germanic

Variants:

  • Arlow (English)
  • Arlowe (English)

Lyonesse

Lyonesse is the name of a country in Arthurian legend bordering Cornwall, the home of Tristan whose father was its king, as well as also being the site of the final battle between King Arthur and Mordred. It was said to have sunk beneath the waters. It’s also the name of an Arthurian character, Lyonesse, the sister of Lynette, in the story of Gareth and Lynette. Lyonesse does sound like a variant spelling of Lioness, the name of a female lion, though I’ve also seen it listed as being the English form of French of Léoneis or Léonois, the French form of Lodonesia which is the Latin name for Lothian, a region in Scotland. The etymology of Lothian is unknown.

Origin: English

Variants:

  • Lyoness
  • Lioness
  • Lionesse

 

Dana

Dana is an English unisex name though it has multiple origins and meanings. As an English given name it’s derived from a surname, a variant of Dane, referring to someone who came from Denmark or had Danish descent. It could also be a variant of D’Aunay, a Huguenot French name derived from several place names in France called Aunay, of unknown meaning.

It’s also the feminine form of Daniel, a Hebrew male name meaning “God is my judge”, or a feminine form of Dan “judge”, as well as meaning a nickname for names such as Bogdana, a Slavic female name meaning “given by God”; Yordana, the Bulgarian feminine form of Jordan meaning “descend” or “flow down” though the name could also have been influenced by Jordanes, an Old German name that probably derives from Old Norse jord meaning “earth”; and Gordana, the feminine form of Gordan, a Slavic name meaning dignified”.  Dana is also a Persian unisex name meaning “wise”, “knowing”, “learned”. Spelled dána, it’s an Irish word meaning “bold” and “presumptuous”, as well as also being a modern form of Danu, the name of an Irish mother goddess and also a Hindu primordial goddess of the sea. Though the etymology behind the name is unclear I’ve seen it listed as meaning “swift flowing” though it also means “river” from the Avestan word dānu meaning “river”; the Danube river comes from this etymology.

Origin: English, Hebrew, Slavic, Persian, Irish,

Variants:

  • Dayna (English)

 

Winifry

Winifry could be a variant form of Winifred, the anglicized form of Welsh given name Gwenfrewi. The first part of the name comes from Welsh gwen meaning “fair, blessed, white” while the second element frewi might mean “reconciliation, peace” so Winifry essentially means “fair peace” or “blessed peace”. However, Winifry could also be a feminine variant form of Winfred, an Old English male name meaning “peaceful friend” from Old English wine (friend) and frið (peace). Winifry has also been used as a surname, originating from the given name.

Origin: Welsh, Old English

Variants:

  • Winifred (Welsh, English)
  • Winnifred (Welsh, English)
  • Gwenfrewi (Welsh)

 

Male forms:

  • Winfred (English)
  • Winfrith (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Winfried (German)

 

Edward

Edward comes from Old English elements ead (wealth, fortune, rich) and weard (guard, guardian) meaning “rich guardian”, “rich guard” or “wealthy guard/guardian”. It’s also an surname derived from the given name.

Nicknames: Ed, Eddy/Eddie, Ted, Teddy, Ned, Lalo (Spanish diminutive of Eduardo), Ede (Hungarian diminutive), Edu (Portuguese diminutive), Dado (Portuguese), Duda (Portuguese)

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Eadweard (Old English)
  • Eduard (German, Russian, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Catalan, Dutch, Estonian, Romanian, Georgian, Armenian)
  • Edvard (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Slovene, Czech, Armenian)
  • Edorta (Basque)
  • Eetu (Finnish)
  • Édouard (French)
  • Ekewaka (Hawaiian)
  • Eduárd (Hungarian)
  • Edvárd (Hungarian)
  • Eadbhárd (Irish)
  • Edoardo (Italian)
  • Eduards (Latvian)
  • Duarte (Portuguese)
  • Eduardo (Portuguese, Spanish)
  • Eideard (Scottish)
  • Ned (English)

 

Female forms:

  • Edwarda (English)
  • Edwardine (English)
  • Edwardina (English)
  • Eduarda (Portuguese)

 

Harlan

Harlan comes from an English surname made up of Old English elements hara (hare), har (gray), hær (rock) and land (land) so the name essentially means “hare land”, “rock land” or “gray land”.

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Harland (English)