Gale

Gale refers to a very strong wind derived from gaile meaning “wind” of uncertain origin though perhaps related to Old Norse gol (breeze) or Old Danish gal meaning “bad, furious” in reference to the wind, derived from Old Norse gala meaning “to shout, charm away” or from Old English galan meaning “to sing, enchant, call” which ultimately derives form Proto-Indo-European gʰel- (to call, chant, shout). Gale is also a surname derived from Old English gal meaning “jovial, merry”, originally a nickname for a cheerful person. Another possible source is it comes from Norman French gaoile meaning “jail”, an occupational name for a jailer or perhaps someone who lived near a jail.

It’s also a nickname for Abigale or a variant spelling of Gail, both of which come from Hebrew meaning “my father is joy”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Old English, Norman French, Hebrew

Variants:

  • Gail
  • Gayle

 

Jerrin

Jerrin seems to be an invented name, either a creative spin on Jeremiah, a Hebrew male name meaning “Yahweh has uplifted” or “Yahweh will raise”, or it could be a combination of names Jeremiah and Darren (either an anglicized form of Irish Dara meaning “oak tree” or a variant of Darrell, from French surname D’Airelle meaning “of Airelle”), or Jared (from Hebrew meaning “descent”) and Darren. It’s just as likely that Jerrin is a variant spelling of Jaron, either a variant transcription of Yaron, Hebrew male name meaning “to sing, to shout”, or which also happens to be another spelling of Jerrin.

Origin: English, Hebrew, Irish, French

Variants:

  • Jerin (English)
  • Jerron (English)
  • Jeron (English)
  • Jerren (English)
  • Jerryn (English)
  • Jaron (Hebrew, English)

Haydn

Haydn is a German surname meaning “pagan” or “heathen” from German Heide, which also means “heath, heathland”. It’s also been used as a variant spelling of Hayden, derived from Old English elements heg (hay) and denu (valley) or dun (hill) meaning “hay valley” or “hay hill”.

Origin: Old English, Germanic

Variants:

  • Hayden (English)

 

Mitchell

Mitchell comes from a surname derived from the given name Michel, the French form of Michael meaning “who is like God?”, a rhetorical question implying there is no one like God. It could also be derived from Old English michel or mechel/muchel meaning “big”, originally a nickname for a big man. Mitchell has also been used as the Anglicized form of Irish surname Mulvihill which comes from Gaelic Ó Maoil Mhichíl “descendant of the devotee of St. Michael”, as well as also used as an Anglicized form of another surname, Mickschel, a Czech surname.

Nicknames: Mitch

Origin: Hebrew, Old English

Variants:

  • Mitchel (English)

 

Arjay

Arjay is a phonetic spelling of initials R and J. According to Wikipedia, there’s a coal town in Kentucky called Arjay named after the initials of a coal operater named R.J. Asher in 1911. Although it doesn’t seem to have a meaning, it could always be used as a nickname for someone with the initials RJ.

Origin: English

Variants:

  • RJ
  • R.J.

 

Avery

Avery comes from an English surname derived from two possible given names: either the Norman French form of Alberich meaning “elf power” or “elf ruler” from Germanic elements alf (elf) and ric (power, ruler), or it could be a medieval variant of Alfred, an English name composed of Old English elements aelf (elf) and raed (counsel) meaning “elf counsel”.

Origin: German, Old English

Variants:

  • Averie (English)

 

Corliss

Corliss comes from an English surname meaning “carefree person” or “cheerful person” from Old English carleas (careless, reckless, free from care). It likely originated as a nickname for a carefree person or someone who was always happy.

Origin: Old English

 

Reilly, Riley

 

Reilly comes from an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of Gaelic surname  Ó Raghallaigh meaning “descendent of Raghailleach”, the latter a name of unknown meaning. Although Riley is another spelling of name, it also has a different source, from an English place name meaning “rye clearing” composed of Old English elements ryge (rye) and leah (clearing, meadow).

Origin: Gaelic, Old English

Variants:

  • Ryley
  • Rylee
  • Ryleigh
  • Rylie

 

Mycroft

Mycroft comes from an English surname meaning “farm by the mouth of a stream”, made up of Old English elements mýðe (mouth of a stream) and croft (small enclosed field), likely referring to a place located near the mouth of a stream.

Origin: Old English

 

 

Elmore

Elmore comes from a surname meaning “river bank where the elms grow” from Old English elements elm (elm) and ofer (river bank, ridge). It was a habitational surname originally used to refer to someone who lived near such a place.

Origin: Old English