Olin

Olin is a unisex name, a feminine form of Oline from Scandinavian male name Ole, the Danish and Norwegian masculine form of Olaf which comes from Old Norse Áleifr meaning “ancestor’s descendant” from Old Norse elements anu (ancestor) and leifr (descendant). Olin could also be the male form of Olina which also comes from the same source as Oline. Spelled Olenit’s the Russian word for “deer” as well as also possibly being a variat of Middle English holin, the word for holly.

As a surname, Olin could be from Germanic element odal meaning “heritage, fatherland”.

Origin: Old Norse, Russian, Middle English, Germanic

Female forms:

  • Oline (Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Finnish, Greenlandic)
  • Olina (Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Greenlandic, Finnish)

 

Male forms:

  • Ole (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Olaf (Danish, Norwegian, German, Dutch, Polish)
  • Olen

 

Eliot

Eliot comes from an English surname, originally used as a medieval pet-form of Elias, a cognate of Elijah, a Hebrew male name meaning “my God is Yahweh” or “Yahweh is my God”.

However, Elliott as a surname might come from an entirely different source: it could be derived from a Middle English male personal name, Athelgeat, meaning “noble Geat”, composed from Middle English athel (noble) and Geat, the name of a North Germanic tribe in southern Sweden. It might also be from Athelgyth, a Middle English female name meaning “noble battle” from Middle English athel (noble) and gyð (war, battle), or from Aelfweald meaning “elf ruler”. It might also be an Anglicized form of Gaelic eileach meaning “dam, mound, bank”.

I listed Eliot as a unisex name- some people might disagree with that and argue it’s a boy’s name and I’m not going to argue against that. But as a fan of the tv show Scrubs, I guess I’ve been able to see it as both.

Origin: Hebrew, Middle English

Variants:

  • Elliott (English)
  • Elliot (English)
  • Eliott (English)
  • Elyot (English)
  • Eliette

 

Dean

Dean is from an English surname, either derived from Middle English dene meaning “valley” or else it’s an occupational surname meaning “dean”, referring to a person who was a dean or someone who worked for one, referring to an ecclesialtical head of a cathedral. It’s derived from Latin decanus meaning “chief of ten” in reference to someone who was in charge of ten people. A dean is the head of a college or university.

Dean could also be a variant spelling of Deen or Dīn, an Arabic male name meaning “religion”.

Origin: Latin, Arabic

Variants:

  • Deen (Arabic)
  • Dene (English)

 

Lester

Origin: English, Latin

Meaning: There are two possible origins to the name. The first is that it could be a variant of litster, a Middle English word meaning “to dye” or “dye”, referring to a textile dyer.

Lester is also derived from the name of a city, Leicester; the first part of the name comes from the name of a river, Ligore, combined with Old English ceaster meaning “Roman fort” from Latin castra “camp”. The first part of the name is a little tricky though Ligore most likely came from the name of a tribe living around the area, possibly meaning “dwellers on the river Legra”

Variants:

  • Lestor

 

Franklin

Origin: Anglo-Norman

Meaning: originally a surname which comes from Middle English frankeleyn meaning “free man” from Old French fraunclein referring to someone who owned land but was not of noble birth.

Nicknames include: Frank and Franky/Frankie

Variants:

  • Franklyn