Tyrus

Tyrus has several possible meanings and origins such as

  • being the Latin name of Greek Tyros, the name of an ancient Phoenician port city now known as Tyre, Lebanon (or Sur/Sour in Arabic). It was supposedly the birth place of Europa, who was the mother of King Minos of Crete who was abducted by the Greek god Zeus in the form of a white bull; the continent of Europe was named after her; and Dido, the ill-fated lover of Aeneas and the founder of Carthage (in what is now modern day Tunisia). The name means “rock” after the rocky formation of the island from Phoenician ṣūr (rock);
  • Tyrus could also be a combination of given names Tyrone, which comes from Irish meaning “land of Eoghan”, and Cyrus which comes from Kyros, the Greek form of Persian Kurush of unknown meaning though possibly meaning “far-sighted”, “young”, “sun”, “hero”, “one who bestows care”, and “humiliator of the enemy in verbal contest”. The name has also possibly been associated with Greek kyrios meaning “lord”;
  • as a surname, Tyrus could be a variant of Tyer, which comes from a Germanic personal name Theudhard meaning “hardy people” or “brave race/strong race” from Germanic elements theod (people, race) and hard (hardy, brave, strong); it may also be related to Tye, a Middle English topographic name meaning “common pasture”, referring to someone who lived near one;
  • Tyer may also be a shortened form of McIntyre, a Scottish surname meaning “son of the craftsman”.

Origin: Phoenician, Irish, Persian, Greek, Ancient Germanic, Middle English, Scottish

Variants:

  • Tyros (Greek)
  • Tyre

 

Advertisements

Cadrian

Cadrian seems to be a modern English name, either an elaborated form of Cade, which has a variety of meanings and origins such as:

  • being an English surname derived from a metonymic occupational surname for a cooper (someone who made and repaired barrels) which comes from Old French cade (cask, barrel);
  • it could also be from a Medieval English given name, Cada, which comes from a Germanic root word meaning “lump” or “swelling”;
  • it may also be related to Middle English cade referring to a pet or domestic animal that has been abandoned by its mother and reared by hand. The word itself comes from an unknown origin. As a surname it seems to have originated as a nickname for a gentle or inoffensive person;
  • Cade is also another name for the Juniperus oxycedrus (also known as prickly juniper or cade juniper ( from French genévrier cade);
  • Cade is also the Italian third-person singular present meaning “fall” from Latin cadere (fall).

It’s also possible that Cadrian is another form of Adrian, which comes from Latin Hadrian derived from Roman cognomen Hadrianus meaning “from Hadria” or “from Adria”, Adria being another form of the name. It referred to someone who came from the town of Hadria/Adria situated in Northern Italy. The Adriatic sea received its name from the town. Though the origin behind the name is uncertain, it could be from Illyrian adur meaning “water, sea” though it could also be from Latin atra, a neuter of atrum meaning “black city”, which comes from Proto-Indo-European root *ater (fire).

Cadrian also seems to have some use as a surname although

Origin: Old French, Germanic, Middle English, Latin, Illyrian, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Cadrien (English)
  • Adrian (English)
  • Cade (English)
  • Cadrienne (English) f
  • Cadrianne (English) f

 

Olin

Olin is a unisex name, a feminine form of Oline from Scandinavian male name Ole, the Danish and Norwegian masculine form of Olaf which comes from Old Norse Áleifr meaning “ancestor’s descendant” from Old Norse elements anu (ancestor) and leifr (descendant). Olin could also be the male form of Olina which also comes from the same source as Oline. Spelled Olenit’s the Russian word for “deer” as well as also possibly being a variat of Middle English holin, the word for holly.

As a surname, Olin could be from Germanic element odal meaning “heritage, fatherland”.

Origin: Old Norse, Russian, Middle English, Germanic

Female forms:

  • Oline (Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Finnish, Greenlandic)
  • Olina (Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Greenlandic, Finnish)

 

Male forms:

  • Ole (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Olaf (Danish, Norwegian, German, Dutch, Polish)
  • Olen

 

Eliot

Eliot comes from an English surname, originally used as a medieval pet-form of Elias, a cognate of Elijah, a Hebrew male name meaning “my God is Yahweh” or “Yahweh is my God”.

However, Elliott as a surname might come from an entirely different source: it could be derived from a Middle English male personal name, Athelgeat, meaning “noble Geat”, composed from Middle English athel (noble) and Geat, the name of a North Germanic tribe in southern Sweden. It might also be from Athelgyth, a Middle English female name meaning “noble battle” from Middle English athel (noble) and gyð (war, battle), or from Aelfweald meaning “elf ruler”. It might also be an Anglicized form of Gaelic eileach meaning “dam, mound, bank”.

I listed Eliot as a unisex name- some people might disagree with that and argue it’s a boy’s name and I’m not going to argue against that. But as a fan of the tv show Scrubs, I guess I’ve been able to see it as both.

Origin: Hebrew, Middle English

Variants:

  • Elliott (English)
  • Elliot (English)
  • Eliott (English)
  • Elyot (English)
  • Eliette

 

Dean

Dean is from an English surname, either derived from Middle English dene meaning “valley” or else it’s an occupational surname meaning “dean”, referring to a person who was a dean or someone who worked for one, referring to an ecclesialtical head of a cathedral. It’s derived from Latin decanus meaning “chief of ten” in reference to someone who was in charge of ten people. A dean is the head of a college or university.

Dean could also be a variant spelling of Deen or Dīn, an Arabic male name meaning “religion”.

Origin: Latin, Arabic

Variants:

  • Deen (Arabic)
  • Dene (English)

 

Lester

Origin: English, Latin

Meaning: There are two possible origins to the name. The first is that it could be a variant of litster, a Middle English word meaning “to dye” or “dye”, referring to a textile dyer.

Lester is also derived from the name of a city, Leicester; the first part of the name comes from the name of a river, Ligore, combined with Old English ceaster meaning “Roman fort” from Latin castra “camp”. The first part of the name is a little tricky though Ligore most likely came from the name of a tribe living around the area, possibly meaning “dwellers on the river Legra”

Variants:

  • Lestor

 

Franklin

Origin: Anglo-Norman

Meaning: originally a surname which comes from Middle English frankeleyn meaning “free man” from Old French fraunclein referring to someone who owned land but was not of noble birth.

Nicknames include: Frank and Franky/Frankie

Variants:

  • Franklyn