Anna-Maria

Anna-Maria is a female given name, a combination of Anna and Maria:

  • Anna is the Latinate form of Hannah which comes from the Hebrew name Channah meaning “grace” or “favor”;
  • Maria comes from the Hebrew female name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian source either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr“love”. Maria is also the feminine form of Marius, a Roman family name which could be derived from Latin mas meaning “male” or Latin mare meaning “sea”. It could also be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart of the Greek god Ares), a name of uncertain etymology though it’s possible that Mars was derived from an older source, perhaps from from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture) of unknown meaning. Mars could also be the contracted form of an older name, Mavors (or Mavort) which could come from Latin verb mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn), essentially meaning “turner of the battle”. Mars could also be derived from the same  Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”.

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Etruscan, Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Annamaria (Italian, English)
  • Annamária (Hungarian)
  • Annemarie (Dutch, German)
  • Annmarie (English)

 

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Lavinia

Lavinia is the name of the second wife of Aeneas in Roman mythology, the daughter of King Latinus and the namesake of the town Lavinium though it might be the other way around, that she derived her name from the town. The etymology behind the name is unknown, most likely an Etruscan name whose meaning was lost to time. In Titus Andronicus (1588-1593) Lavinia is the daughter of Titus Andronicus who is raped, has her tongue and hands cut off, and is later killed by her father.

Origin: Latin, Etruscan

Variants:

  • Lavínia (Portuguese, Catalan)

 

Volterra

Volterra is the name of a town in Italy that goes back to the time of the Etruscans (who called it Velathri before the Roman conquered it and renamed it Volterrae, eventually becoming Volterra). The name is of Etruscan origin and the first part of the name, vel, might come from a root verb used to indicate height, such as a hill, and used in the names of families to indicate a high status. As a surname Volterra is used to describe someone who came from the town of Volterra.

Origin: Etruscan

Variants:

  • Velathri (Etruscan)

 

Camelia

Camelia is the Romanian spelling of Camellia, the name of a genus of flowering shrubs named after botanist Georg Kamel. Kamel seems to be a variant of either Latin Camelus meaning “camel” via Ancient Greek kamēlos meaning “camel” derived from Proto-Semitic *gamal (camel); or it could be a Moravian form of Camillus, a Roman cognomen which refers to a noble Roman boy who served as an acolyte assisting in ancient Roman rituals. Though it’s often associated with Latin it seems more likely that the name comes from a Etruscan source of unknown meaning.

Origin: Proto-Semitic, Latin, Etruscan

Variants:

  • Camélia (French)
  • Camellia (English)

 

Roma

Roma is the Latin name for the city of Rome, a name of uncertain etymology though the name’s origins have often been linked to its founder, Romulus, meaning “of Rome”. However, it’s likely that Romulus may have derived his name from the city and other theories regarding Rome’s meaning are: it might be from Greek rhōmē meaning “strength” or “might”; rheo or Latin ruo meaning “flow”; or from Etruscan ruma from the root word for “teat”, either in reference to the wolf that took in and suckled the infants Romulus and Remus in Roman mythology, or so named for the shape of the Palatine and Aventine hills.

Roma is also the Russian diminutive of Roman which comes from Latin Romanus meaning “Roman”, referring to a citizen of Rome, as well as also used to refer to the Roman goddess or personification of the ancient city of Rome in Roman mythology.

Origin: Uncertain, possibly Greek or Etruscan

Variants:

  • Roman (Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German)
  • Romanus (Latin)
  • Romanos (Latin, Greek)
  • Romain (French)
  • Romano (Italian)
  • Romeo (Italian)
  • Romolo (Italian form of Romulus)
  • Romaeus (Latin form of Romeo)
  • Romà (Catalan)
  • Román (Hungarian, Spanish)
  • Romão (Portuguese)

 

Female forms:

  • Romana (Italian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Late Roman)
  • Romola (Italian feminine form of Romulus)
  • Romaine (French, English)
  • Romane (French)
  • Romayne (English)
  • Romána (Hungarian)

 

Marcel

Marcel comes from Marcellus, a Roman family name that was originally a diminutive of given name Marcus which seems to be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male” though it might also be from Latin marcus meaning “large hammer”.

However, it’s possible that Mars is related to a much older source, perhaps from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture), his name of unknown meaning. Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavors, a cognate of Oscan Mamers, which could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”.

Mars could also be derived from the same Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”, which would make sense since Mars is the god of war.

Origin: Latin, Proto-Indo-European

Variants:

  • Marcellus (Ancient Roman, German, Dutch)
  • Marceli (Polish)
  • Marcell (Hungarian, German)
  • Marzell (German)
  • Martzel (Basque)
  • Marcello (Italian)
  • Marcelo (Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Marcellin (French)

 

Female forms:

  • Marcellina (Ancient Roman)
  • Marcella (Ancient Roman, German, Italian)
  • Marceline (French)
  • Marcelline (French)
  • Marcelle (French)
  • Marcellette (French)
  • Marcelyn (English)
  • Marcelina (Polish)
  • Marcela (Spanish, Polish, Romanian, Czech)
  • Marsaili (Scottish)

 

Titus

Titus comes from an Ancient Roman given name of unknown meaning though it has been linked to Latin titulus meaning “title of honor” or Latin titio “fire-brand”. It’s likely, however, that the name is pre-Roman in origin, possibly Sabine, and its true meaning lost to time. Titus is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Latin, Sabine

Variants:

  • Tito (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)
  • Tiitus (Estonian, Finnish)
  • Titos (Biblical Greek)
  • Titas (Lithuanian)
  • Tytus (Polish)
  • Tit (Russian)
  • Titius (Ancient Roman)

 

Female forms:

  • Titia (Ancient Roman, Dutch, German)
  • Tita (Ancient Roman)

 

Gaius

Gaius is a Roman given name though one of uncertain etymology. It could be derived from Latin gaudere meaning “to rejoice”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from Gaia, a feminine name meaning “earth” in Greek, or perhaps from an Etruscan source that has long since lost its meaning. Apparently it was a very common given name to the point that it became a generic term for a man, with Gaia being a generic term for a woman, as well as being used in marriage ceremonies- ex: “where you are Gaius, I am Gaia”.

Origin: Latin, Greek, Etruscan

Variants:

  • Caius (Ancient Roman)
  • Gaios (Ancient Greek)
  • Caio (Portugese)
  • Gaioz (Georgian)
  • Kajus (Lithuanian)

 

Female forms:

  • Gaia (Ancient Roman, Ancient Greek)
  • Caia (Ancient Roman)

 

Martin

Origin: Latin

Meaning: Martin comes from the Roman name Martinus meaning “belonging to Mars”, Mars being the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Ares). Mars is a name of uncertain etymology and meaning though it could possibly be related to Latin mas meaning “male”.

However, it’s possible that Mars is related to a much older source, perhaps from Etruscan Maris (the god of fertility and agriculture), his name of unknown meaning. Mars could also be a contracted form of an older name, Mavors, a cognate of Oscan Mamers, which could possibly be related to Latin mah or margh (to cut) and vor (to turn) essentially meaning “turner of the battle”.

Mars could also be derived from the same Proto-Indian-European root as Sanskrit marici meaning “ray of light”, or Proto-Indian-European mer meaning “to die”. It could also be associated with Latin marceo meaning “to (cause to) wither” and “to (make) shrivel” and Latin marcus meaning “hammer”, which would make sense since Mars is the god of war.

As well as being a given name, Martin is also a common surname derived from the same source.

Marty/Martie is an obvious nickname for Martin.

Variants:

  • Martinus (Ancient Roman, Dutch)
  • Maarten (Dutch)
  • Marten (Dutch)
  • Martijn (Dutch)
  • Merten (German)
  • Mårten (Swedish)
  • Morten (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Márton (Hungarian)
  • Martti (Finnish)
  • Mattin (Basque)
  • Martí (Catalan)
  • Máirtín (Irish)
  • Martino (Italian)
  • Martynas (Lithuanian)
  • Marcin (Polish)
  • Martim (Portuguese)
  • Martinho (Portuguese)
  • Martín (Spanish)
  • Martyn (Welsh, Ukrainian)

 

Feminine forms:

  • Martine (French, Dutch, Norwegian, English)
  • Martina (German, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, English, Dutch, Swedish, Ancient Roman)