Trip

Trip comes from a word referring to a journey or a voyage, or it refers to someone who stumbles and falls. It comes from Old French tripper (strike with the feet, tread or skip lightly) which comes from a Germanic source; or it could be from Middle Dutch trippen meaning “to skip, hop, trot, stamp, trample”. Tri- is also a Latin root word meaning “three”, used in conjection with other words such as triple and trisect, so Trip could be used with that in mind, or it could also be used as  nickname for someone who is the third (III) generation of the same name.

Origin: Old French Middle Dutch, Latin

Variants:

  • Tripp (English)

 

Gale

Gale refers to a very strong wind derived from gaile meaning “wind” of uncertain origin though perhaps related to Old Norse gol (breeze) or Old Danish gal meaning “bad, furious” in reference to the wind, derived from Old Norse gala meaning “to shout, charm away” or from Old English galan meaning “to sing, enchant, call” which ultimately derives form Proto-Indo-European gʰel- (to call, chant, shout). Gale is also a surname derived from Old English gal meaning “jovial, merry”, originally a nickname for a cheerful person. Another possible source is it comes from Norman French gaoile meaning “jail”, an occupational name for a jailer or perhaps someone who lived near a jail.

It’s also a nickname for Abigale or a variant spelling of Gail, both of which come from Hebrew meaning “my father is joy”.

Origin: Proto-Indo-European, Old English, Norman French, Hebrew

Variants:

  • Gail
  • Gayle

 

Neville

Neville comes from a surname via a place name in Normandy, France. It comes from Old French neu (new) and ville (town) meaning “new town”.

Origin: Old French

Variants:

  • Nevel (English)
  • Nevil (English)

 

Jerrin

Jerrin seems to be an invented name, either a creative spin on Jeremiah, a Hebrew male name meaning “Yahweh has uplifted” or “Yahweh will raise”, or it could be a combination of names Jeremiah and Darren (either an anglicized form of Irish Dara meaning “oak tree” or a variant of Darrell, from French surname D’Airelle meaning “of Airelle”), or Jared (from Hebrew meaning “descent”) and Darren. It’s just as likely that Jerrin is a variant spelling of Jaron, either a variant transcription of Yaron, Hebrew male name meaning “to sing, to shout”, or which also happens to be another spelling of Jerrin.

Origin: English, Hebrew, Irish, French

Variants:

  • Jerin (English)
  • Jerron (English)
  • Jeron (English)
  • Jerren (English)
  • Jerryn (English)
  • Jaron (Hebrew, English)

Perry

Perry is a nickname for Peregrine, from Latin Peregrinus meaning “traveler”, or Percival, likely based on Welsh Peredur meaning “hard spear” though the spelling of the name was altered to resemble Old French percer val “to pierce the valley”. Perry is also an English surname which comes from Middle English perrie meaning “pear tree”, referring to someone who lived near a pear tree. As a Welsh patrynomic surname it comes from ap Herry meaning “son of Herry”, the latter a medieval English form of Henry meaning “home ruler”. Spelled Perriit’s an Italian surname derived from given name Peter meaning “stone”.

Origin: Latin, Welsh, Old French, Greek

Variants:

  • Peregrine
  • Percival
  • Perri (u)
  • Peri (u)
  • Perrie (u)

 

Russ

Russ is a short form of Russell, an English male name which comes from a surname meaning “little red one” from Old French rousel. It was originally given as a nickname for someone who had red hair or a reddish complexion.

Russ is also an archaic word for Russian.

Origin: Old French

Variants:

  • Russell (English)
  • Russel (English)
  • Rusty (English)
  • Russett (English; unisex)

 

Lakisha

Lakisha is a female name which is composed of the French prefix La meaning “the” combined with the given name Kisha, a variant spelling of Keisha which could be a variant spelling of Keziah meaning “cassia, cinnamon”.

Origin: Hebrew

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Variants:

  • Lakeisha
  • LaKisha
  • LaKeisha
  • Lakeshia

 

Beck

Beck is an English surname derived from German surname Bach meaning “brook, stream”, a cognate of Old Norse bekkr (stream, brook). It could also be a short form of Becker, another Germanic surname meaning “baker”.

Beck could also be a short form of Beckett, another English surname that comes from the same source as Bach.

It also comes from Middle English beke by way of Old French bec meaning “beak”. It was used as a nickname for someone who had a prominent nose, or which resembled the beak of a bird.

Beck is also a word, used in the idiom “at someone’s beck and call”, referring to someone ready to obey someone’s orders or subject to their slightest whims.

Origin: German, Old Norse, Old French

 

 

Twyla

Twyla is a variant spelling of Twila, a name of uncertain etymology though it could perhaps be based on the English word twilight, referring to the period before sunrise and after sunset during which a soft light is seen in the skyThe word comes from Old English twi (double, half) and light (light) essentially meaning “second light” or “half light”. Another possible meaning is that it’s based on the French word étoile meaning “star”.

Origin: Old English

Variants:

  • Twila
  • Twilight (unisex)

 

Brandon

Brandon is from an English surname derived from a place name meaning “hill covered with broom” from Old English brom (broom, gorse) and dun (hill), likely referring to someone who lived near a place covered with gorse or broom shrubs.

However, Brandon could also be derived from Old French brandon from Frankish *brand meaning “firebrand, torch, sword” which ultimately comes from Proto-Germanic *brandaz, a cognate of Old Norse brandr.

It could also be a various form of Brendan, an Irish name derived from Welsh brenin meaning “prince” from Celtic brigantinos meaning “king, prince”, “lord” or “high one”.

Origin: Old English, Proto-Germanic, Old Norse, Celtic

Variants:

  • Branden (English)
  • Brendan (Irish, English)