Baylor

Baylor comes from an English surname with several possible meanings: either a variant spelling of Bailor, which comes from a legal term meaning "one who delivers goods", referring to someone who transferred property to another person (bailee) for safekeeping, from Old French bailler (to deliver, hand over) ultimately derived from Latin bāiulus (one who bears a burden; porter, carrier); it could … Continue reading Baylor

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Henry

Henry comes from Germanic given name Heimirich meaning "home ruler" from Germanic elements heim (home) and ric (power, rule). It's also a surname derived form the given name. Origin: Ancient Germanic Variants: Heimirich (Ancient Germanic) Heinrich (Ancient Germanic, German) Henricus (Dutch, Latinized Ancient Germanic) Henrik (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Armenian) Endika (Basque) Enric (Catalan) Jindřich (Czech) Herry (Medieval … Continue reading Henry

Hannibal

Hannibal is the name of a famous Carthaginian general who is considered one of the greatest military generals in history and caused the Ancient Romans great fear. His name comes from Phoenician haan (grace) combined with the name Ba'al meaning "grace of Ba'al", Ba'al being the name of the chief god of the Phoenician pantheon which means "lord, husband". Hannibal … Continue reading Hannibal

Lyndon

Lyndon comes from an English surname meaning "lime tree hill" or "flax hill" from Old English elements lind (lime tree) derived from Proto-Germanic *linþaz (flexible, supple, mild), or lin (flax) and dun (hill). It was originally used as a topographical name for someone who lived near lime trees. Origin: Old English, Proto-Germanic Variants: Lindon (English) Linden (English)  

Herman

Herman is a male name made up of Germanic elements hari (army) and man (man) meaning "army man". It's also a surname derived from the given name. Origin: Germanic Variants: Hermann (German) Hermanus (Dutch, Ancient Germanic) Hariman (Ancient Germanic) Hermanni (Finnish) Armand (French) Ármann (Icelandic) Armando (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese) Ermanno (Italian) German (Russian)  

Warren

Warren comes from an English surname with a few possible origins: it could be derived from Norman French warrene meaning "animal enclosure" or "game park" possibly originating from Gaulish *varenna (enclosed area) from *varros (stick, post); it may also refer to someone who lived near a game park; it may be derived from a town called La Varenne in Normandy, France; … Continue reading Warren

Parker

Parker comes from an English surname, an occupational name for someone who was a gamekeeper, meaning "keeper of the park" or "park keeper". It comes from Proto-Germanic *parrukaz (enclosure, fence). Origin: Proto-Germanic  

Caroline

Caroline is the French form of Carolina, the feminine form of Carolus which is the Latin form of Charles, derived from Germanic Karl from Proto-Germanic *karilaz meaning "free man", used to refer to men who were not thralls or servants but who still lived at the bottom of society so it connotes the idea of a free man. Nicknames: Carrie Origin: Proto-Germanic   Variants: … Continue reading Caroline

Elendora

Elendora seems to be a unique name. There wasn't much information I could find out about it, though if I had to take a guess it could be a combination of Eleanor and Dora;  Eleanor is the Od French form of Occitan Aliénor which could possibly mean "the other Aenor" derived from Latin alia meaning “another” derived Proto-Indo-European *h₂élyos (beyond, other) from the root … Continue reading Elendora

Runa

Runa has several possible meanings and etymologies such as: it is the Scandinavian feminine form of Rune, derived from Old Norse rún meaning "secret lore" which comes from Proto-Germanic *rūnō (whisper, murmur). it's also a Latin word meaning "dart" or "javelin"; it's also a Latvian word meaning "speech, delivery, talk"; it's also a Quechua word meaning "man, person, … Continue reading Runa