Jared

Jared is the English form of Hebrew name Yared or Yered meaning “descent”, so named because in his time angels descended from Heaven down to earth. Jared could also be related to a root word meaning “to rule, command” and I’ve also seen it listed as meaning “rose”, although I don’t know how accurate that last part is. Jared is also a surname though it doesn’t come from Hebrew but from a patrynomic surname meaning “son of Gerard”, Gerard meaning “brave spear” or “hardy spear” from Germanic elements ger (spear) and hard (brave, hardy);

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Jarod (English)
  • Jarrod (English)
  • Jarred (English)
  • Jerrod (English)
  • Jerred (English)
  • Jered (English)
  • Iared (Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin)
  • Yared (Hebrew, Ethiopian)
  • Yered (Hebrew)

 

Bellicent

Bellicent could be an Old French form of Belissendis, a Germanic name made of elements bili (gentle, kind, fitting, suitable, proper) and swind (strong, brave, powerful) so essentially meaning “gentle power” or “gentle strength”. It could also possibly be related to Belenus, the name of a Celtic god of the sun, whose name possibly means “bright, brilliant”

In the Arthurian legends, Bellicent is the half-sister of King Arthur (though in some versions she goes by Morgause) and is the mother of Gareth and Gawain.

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Belisent
  • Belisant

 

King

King comes from Old English cyning meaning “king, ruler”, which is derived from Proto-Germanic *kuninggaz, coming from “kin, family, clan”, originally used in reference to someone who was a leader of the people or perhaps someone born of noble birth. It’s used as a royal title referring to a male monarch, though in the modern world it’s used less for someone who’s descended from noble birth and more as a modern appellation (or even from a woman’s maiden name). As a surname, it came about as a nickname for someone who acted in a kingly manner or someone who played the part of a king in a pageant.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

 

Gilberte

Gilberte (pr. zheel-bert in French; Forvo and Youtube) is the French female form of Gilbert, an English male name meaning “bright pledge” or “bright hostage” from Germanic elements gisil (pledge, host) and beraht (bright).

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Gilberta (Dutch, Italian)

 

Male forms:

  • Gilbert (Ancient Germanic, German, Dutch, French, English)
  • Giselbert (Ancient Germanic)
  • Gisilbert (Ancient Germanic)
  • Gilberto (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)

 

Rosie

Rosie is usually treated as a nickname for Rose, the Norman form of Rohese meaning “famous type, famous kind” from Germanic elements hrod (fame) and heid (kind, sort, type). Rose later became associated with Latin Rosa meaning “rose”, referring to the flower. Spelled Rosy, it refers to a pinkish-red color as well as used to refer to something that is cheerful, bright, and optimistic, or it can be used to refer to someone who has rosy cheeks i.e., having a healthy pink complexion.

Origin: Ancient Germanic, Latin

Variants:

  • Rosy (English)
  • Rose (English, French)

 

Haydn

Haydn is a German surname meaning “pagan” or “heathen” from German Heide, which also means “heath, heathland”. It’s also been used as a variant spelling of Hayden, derived from Old English elements heg (hay) and denu (valley) or dun (hill) meaning “hay valley” or “hay hill”.

Origin: Old English, Germanic

Variants:

  • Hayden (English)

 

Wilhelmina

Wilhelmina is the feminine form of Wilhelm, the German cognate of William meaning “willful protection” or “desiring protection” made up from Germanic elements wil (will, desire) and helm (helmet, protection”.

Nicknames: Will, Mina, Willie/Willy

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Wilhelmine (German)
  • Wilhelma (German)
  • Wilma (German, Dutch, English)
  • Vilma (Spanish, Hungarian, German, Swedish, Finnish, Czech, Slovak, Coatian)
  • Vilhelmiina (Finnish)
  • Vilhelmina (Lithuanian, Swedish)
  • Willamina (English)

 

Female forms:

  • Wilhelm (Ancient Germanic, German, Polish)
  • William (English)
  • Willem (Dutch)
  • Wilhelmus (Dutch)

 

Umberto

Umberto is the Italian form of Humbert, a Germanic name meaning “bright warrior” or “bright bear cub” from Germanic elements hun (warrior, bear cub) and beraht (bright). I’ve also seen the first element of the name hun as being connected to the Huns, a nomadic tribe who came from somewhere between the Caucasus and Central Asia. Humbert is also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Humbert (German, French, English)
  • Hunberct (Ancient Germanic)
  • Humberto (Spanish, Portuguese)

 

Female forms:

  • Umberta (Italian)

 

Hilda

Hilda comes from Germanic element hild meaning “battle” as well as being a nickname for any name beginning with Hilde such as Hildebrand or Hildred. Hilda is also a cogante of Old Norse Hildr, the name of a Valkyrie in Norse mythology who had the power to revive the dead.

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Hildy (English)
  • Hylda (English)
  • Hilde (German, Dutch, Norwegian)
  • Hildur (Icelandic, Norwegian)
  • Hild (Old English)
  • Hildr (Ancient Scandinavian, Norse mythology)
  • Ilda (Italian)
  • Elda (Italian)