Vida

Vida is a Spanish and Portuguese word meaning "life" as well as the Slovene feminine form of Vitus, a Roman name which derives from Latin vita (life) from Proto-Indo-European *gʷeyh₃- (to live). Vida could also be the Slovene feminine form of Wido which comes from an Ancient Germanic element witu "wood" or wid "wide". Vida … Continue reading Vida

Advertisements

Eden

Eden is the name of the biblical garden where Adam and Eve came from before being expelled, becoming synonomous with paradise and anyplace that is fertile and utnouched. Although I've seen it listed as meaning "place of paradise" from Hebrew, it could perhaps be derived from an older source, Sumerian edin meaning "steppe" or "plain". … Continue reading Eden

Drew

Drew is used as a short form of Andrew, which is the English form of Greek male name Andreas, derived from Greek andreios meaning “manly, masculine”. It's also the anglicized form of Drogo, itself an Ancient Germanic personal name either derived from Gothic meaning "to bear", "to carry" or from an Old Saxon root meaning "ghost" or "phantom". Drew is also a surname … Continue reading Drew

Yolanda

Yolanda is the Spanish form of French Yolande which seems to be possibly influenced from Greek Iolanthe meaning "violet flower" from Greek elements iole (violet) and anthos (flower), though it's just as likely that it's derived from Violante derived from Latin viola meaning "violet". Yolanda could also be Germanic in origin, perhaps deriving from Old Germanic iv … Continue reading Yolanda

Howard

Howard comes from an English surname with several possible sources: it may be derived from Anglo-Norman Huard from Germanic name Hughard meaning "brave heart" from hug (heart, mind) and hard (brave, hardy); it may also be derived from Anglo-Scandinavian Haward derived from Old Norse Hávarðr meaning "high guardian" or "high defender" from Old Norse elements há (high) and varðr (guardian, defender); it may also be derived from Middle English ewehirde meaning "ewe … Continue reading Howard

Walter

Walter comes from Germanic elements wald (ruler, leader, power) from Proto-Germanic *waldaną (to rule) via Proto-Indo-European *h₂welh₁– (to rule; strong, powerful); and hari (army), also derived from a PIE root word; so the name means "ruler of the army". Walter is also a surname derived from the given name. Nicknames: Walt, Wally Origin: Proto-Indo-European Variants: Valter (Portuguese, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Croatian, Estonian) Gualtiero … Continue reading Walter

Leopold

Leopold is made up from Ancient Germanic elements leud (people) and bald (bold) meaning "bold people", likely referring to a tribe or nation of strong or fearless people, though the first part of the name has also been associated with Latin leo (lion). Leopold is also a surname derived from the given name. Nicknames: Leo, Poldi (German nickname) Origin: Ancient Germanic Variants: … Continue reading Leopold

Randall

Randall is a variant spelling of Randel, a medieval diminutive of given name Randolf, a Germanic male name meaning "shield of a wolf" or "wolf's shield" from Germanic elements rand (rim 'of a shield') and wulf (wolf). Randall is also a surname. Nicknames: Randy, Rand Origin: Ancient Germanic   Variants: Randel (Medieval English) Randell (English) Randle (English) Randolf (German, English) Randolph (English) … Continue reading Randall

Dixie

Dixie was once used as a generic name for the southern U.S. states from the Mason-Dixon line which defined the border between Pennsylvania and Maryland, and which later defined the boundary between free states and slave states. The name may have originated as a nickname for Dixon, an English patrynomic surname meaning "son of Dick", the … Continue reading Dixie

Wilfrid

Wilfrid is a variant spelling of Wilfred, an English male name meaning "desiring peace" or "desires peace" from Ancient Germanic elements wil (will, desire) and frið (peace). Nicknames: Wil/Will, Wilf Origin: Ancient Germanic Variants: Wilfred (English) Willifrid (Ancient Germanic) Wilfrith (Anglo-Saxon) Wilfrið (Anglo-Saxon) Guifré (Catalan) Vilfred (Danish) Wilfried (German) Vilfredo (Italian) Wilfredo (Spanish)