Terry

Terry is an English unisex name originally used as a diminutive of Terence (which comes from Roman family name Terentius which is of uncertain meaning though it could be derived from Latin terens meaning “rubbing, wearing away” from Latin terere (to rub, to wear out) though it might also be related to Sabine terenus meaning “soft”) or Theresa ( comes from Greek Therasia, the name of an island (the name is of uncertain meaning but has been linked to several possible meanings such as Greek theros “summer”, therizo “to harvest, to reap”, ther “wild beast”, or therao “to hunt”).

As an surname, however, Terry comes from medieval given name Thierry, the Norman French form of Theodoric meaning “ruler of the people” from Germanic elements theud (people) and ric (power); it could also be an anglicized form of Gaelic surname Mac Toirdhealbhaigh meaning “son of Toirdhealbhach”, the latter being a personal given name meaning “one who is like Thor” or “one who is like thunder”; or it’s a French surname deirved from Occitan terrin meaning “earthenware vessel, earthenware vase”, an occupational surname for a potter, which comes from Latin terra (earth).

Origin: Latin, Greek, Germanic, Gaelic

Variants:

  • Terrie
  • Terri
  • Teri

 

Hermes

Hermes is the name of the Greek god of commerce and trade, known as the trickster god and the protector of thieves, travelers, and athletes, as well as a messenger of the gods and the god of boundaries. He guided the souls of the dead to the underworld. The son of Zeus and Maia, one of the Pleiades, the day after his birth when he was just an infant, Hermes stole his half-brother Apollo’s cattle. When Apollo tracked him down, Hermes gave him a lyre he had just invented from the shell of a tortoise as an apology. He is the father of Autolycus, the Prince of Thieves, and the great-grandfather of the hero Odysseus. Although the etymology of the name has been linked to Greek herma meaning “cairn, pile of stones, boundary marker” it could also be related to Proto-European *ser “to bind, put together”; or it could be related to an older word of non-European origin.

Hermes is also a surname, either derived from the name of the Greek god or it could be a Germanic matronynic surname from the given name Ermens, a short form of either Ermelendis (derived from Germanic elements ermen “whole, universal” and linde “soft, tender”) or Ermgart (likely a short form of Ermengarde, also a Germanic name from Germanic ermen “whole, universal” and garde “enclosure”). As a French surname, it could have arisen as a topographic name for someone who lived in a deserted spot or a patch of barren land from Greek eremia “desert, desolate, lonely uninhabited” and the local suffix –ès.

Origin: Ancient Greek, Proto-European, Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Hermès (French)
  • Ermes (Italian)
  • Ermete (Italian)
  • Ermis (Modern Greek)

 

Female forms:

  • Hermione (Ancient Greek)
  • Hermia (English)

 

Dietrich

Dietrich is a Germanic male name meaning “ruler of the people” or “people ruler” from Germanic elements theud (people) and ric (power, ruler). It’s also a surname originating from the given name.

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Diederich (German)
  • Theodoric (Latinized form of Dietrich)
  • Theodoricus (Ancient Germanic Latinized)
  • Derek (English)
  • Diederik (Dutch)
  • Dederick (English)
  • Derick (English)
  • Derrick (English)
  • Deryck (English)
  • Theoderich (Ancient Germanic)
  • Thierry (French)
  • Dirk (Dutch, German, English)
  • Teutorigos (Ancient Celtic)
  • Tudor (Welsh)
  • Tudur (Welsh)

 

Rie

Rie (pr. ree-eh in Japanese; Forvo) is a Japanese female name with a variety of meanings depending on the kanji used. Some possible meanings are: 理恵 “logic, reason + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 利恵 “profit, advantage, benefit + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 梨絵 “pear tree + picture, painting, drawing, sketch”; 理江 “logic, reason + inlet, bay, creek”; 理絵 “logic, reason +picture, painting, drawing, sketch”; 里枝 “village, hometown + bough, branch limb, twig”; 梨恵 “pear tree + favor, blessing, grace, kindness”; 里依 “village, hometown + reliant, depend on, consequently, therefore, due to”. There are likely other meanings depending on the kanji used.

Rie is also a Dutch female name (pr. rhee), used as a nickname for Hendrika, the feminine form of Hendrik, the Dutch and Estonian form of Henry which comes from a Germanic name meaning “home ruler”; and Marie, which comes from Maria, the Latin form of Hebrew name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian name either meaning “beloved” from myr, or from mr “love”. Rie has also been used as a male nickname for Henri, the French male form of Henry.

Spelled ríe, it’s the Spanish verb of ríer meaning “to laugh” which comes from Latin rīdēre (to laugh).

Origin: Japanese, Ancient Germanic, Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Latin

 

 

Ella

Ella comes from Germanic element alja meaning “other, another, foreign” and from which the name Eleanor/Alianor comes from. Ella could also be a nickname for names beginning and ending with ella such as Gabriella (feminine form of Gabriel meaning “God is my strong man” or “God is my strength”) and Daniella (feminine form of Daniel meaning “God is my judge”), Elizabeth (meaning “God is an oath” or “my God is abundance”) and Eleanor, which comes from Old French form of Occitan name Aliénor which could mean “the other Aenor” from Latin alia meaning “another” and the given name Aenor, possibly a Germanic name of unknown meaning, though it’s been linked to Adenorde or Adenor, made up of Germanic elements adal (noble) and nord (north), or even as a contracted form of Azenor, a Breton name of uncertain meaning and etymology though it could also be derived from Breton enor “honor”. Another possible origin of Eleanor is that it originated from the name Helen, an Ancient Greek name of uncertain etymology though it’s been linked to Greek helene meaning “torch” or “corposant”, though it might also be linked to selene meaning “moon ”. Ella is also the Spanish and Italian word for “she”.

Origin: Ancient Germanic, Hebrew, Latin, Ancient Greek

Variants:

  • Alia (Ancient Germanic)

 

Emmeline

Emmeline is an Old French form of Germanic name Amalia, derived from Germanic word amal meaning “work” in reference to the idea of industriousness and fertility.

Origin: Germanic

Variants:

  • Emmaline (English)
  • Emmalyn (English)
  • Emmelyn (English)
  • Emelina (Spanish)
  • Amelina (Ancient Germanic)
  • Amalia (German, Spanish, Dutch, Italian, Romanian)
  • Amelia (English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German)
  • Émeline (French)

 

Jared

Jared is the English form of Hebrew name Yared or Yered meaning “descent”, so named because in his time angels descended from Heaven down to earth. Jared could also be related to a root word meaning “to rule, command” and I’ve also seen it listed as meaning “rose”, although I don’t know how accurate that last part is. Jared is also a surname though it doesn’t come from Hebrew but from a patrynomic surname meaning “son of Gerard”, Gerard meaning “brave spear” or “hardy spear” from Germanic elements ger (spear) and hard (brave, hardy);

Origin: Hebrew, Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Jarod (English)
  • Jarrod (English)
  • Jarred (English)
  • Jerrod (English)
  • Jerred (English)
  • Jered (English)
  • Iared (Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin)
  • Yared (Hebrew, Ethiopian)
  • Yered (Hebrew)

 

Gilberte

Gilberte (pr. zheel-bert in French; Forvo and Youtube) is the French female form of Gilbert, an English male name meaning “bright pledge” or “bright hostage” from Germanic elements gisil (pledge, host) and beraht (bright).

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Gilberta (Dutch, Italian)

 

Male forms:

  • Gilbert (Ancient Germanic, German, Dutch, French, English)
  • Giselbert (Ancient Germanic)
  • Gisilbert (Ancient Germanic)
  • Gilberto (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese)

 

Rosie

Rosie is usually treated as a nickname for Rose, the Norman form of Rohese meaning “famous type, famous kind” from Germanic elements hrod (fame) and heid (kind, sort, type). Rose later became associated with Latin Rosa meaning “rose”, referring to the flower. Spelled Rosy, it refers to a pinkish-red color as well as used to refer to something that is cheerful, bright, and optimistic, or it can be used to refer to someone who has rosy cheeks i.e., having a healthy pink complexion.

Origin: Ancient Germanic, Latin

Variants:

  • Rosy (English)
  • Rose (English, French)

 

Wilhelmina

Wilhelmina is the feminine form of Wilhelm, the German cognate of William meaning “willful protection” or “desiring protection” made up from Germanic elements wil (will, desire) and helm (helmet, protection”.

Nicknames: Will, Mina, Willie/Willy

Origin: Ancient Germanic

Variants:

  • Wilhelmine (German)
  • Wilhelma (German)
  • Wilma (German, Dutch, English)
  • Vilma (Spanish, Hungarian, German, Swedish, Finnish, Czech, Slovak, Coatian)
  • Vilhelmiina (Finnish)
  • Vilhelmina (Lithuanian, Swedish)
  • Willamina (English)

 

Female forms:

  • Wilhelm (Ancient Germanic, German, Polish)
  • William (English)
  • Willem (Dutch)
  • Wilhelmus (Dutch)