King

King comes from Old English cyning meaning “king, ruler”, which is derived from Proto-Germanic *kuninggaz, coming from “kin, family, clan”, originally used in reference to someone who was a leader of the people or perhaps someone born of noble birth. It’s used as a royal title referring to a male monarch, though in the modern world it’s used less for someone who’s descended from noble birth and more as a modern appellation (or even from a woman’s maiden name). As a surname, it came about as a nickname for someone who acted in a kingly manner or someone who played the part of a king in a pageant.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

 

Frey

Frey is a variant of Freyr, the name of the Norse god of fertility and the weather, and the twin brother of Freya, as well as the husband of Gerd, a frost giantess, for whom he gave up a magical sword just to be with her though, without it, he will be killed during Ragnorak. His name comes from Proto-Germanic *frawjaz meaning “lord”.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Variants:

  • Freyr (Norse mythology, Icelandic)
  • Frej (Danish, Swedish, German)
  • Frei

 

Female forms:

  • Freya (Norse mythology, English)
  • Freyja (Norse mythology, Icelandic)
  • Freja (Danish, Swedish, German)
  • Frea (Norse mythology)
  • Frøya (Norwegian)

 

Odin

Odin is an Anglicized form of Old Norse Óðinn which comes from óðr meaning “inspiration, rage, frenzy”. It comes from Proto-Germanic *Wodanaz meaning “poetic fury” derived from *wodaz (rage, manic inspiration, mad, furious, possessed). In Norse mythology, Odin is the chief god of the Norse pantheon, a complex character who presided over war, art, wisdom, death, and magic, as well as poetry and seers. He has one eye and a large beard, and likes to wander, often in a relenetless pursuit of knowledge. Odin also presided over Valhalla and the valkyries, and is supposed to be killed by the wolf Fenrir at the end of the world known as Ragnarok.

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Variants:

  • Oden (Swedish)
  • Óðinn (Icelandic, Old Norse)
  • Woden (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Wodan (Germanic)
  • Wotan (Germanic)

 

Brandy

Brandy is the name of an alcoholic drink, the shortened for of brandywine which is derived from Dutch brandewijn meaning “distilled wine” or “burnt wine”. It could also be a short form, or a feminine form, of Brandon, an English surname derived from a place name meaning “hill covered with broom” from Old English brom (broom, gorse) and dun (hill), likely referring to someone who lived near a place covered with gorse or broom shrubs.

However, Brandon could also be derived from Old French brandon from Frankish *brand meaning “firebrand, torch, sword” which ultimately comes from Proto-Germanic *brandaz, a cognate of Old Norse brandr.

Origin: Dutch, Old English, Proto-Germanic

 

Variants:

  • Brandee (English)
  • Brandi (English)
  • Brandie (English)
  • Brande (English)
  • Branda (English)

 

Male forms:

  • Brandon
  • Branden

 

Dalton

Dalton comes from an English surname derived from a place name meaning “valley town” or “valley enclosure” from Old English elements dael (dale, valley) ultimately deriving from Proto-Germanic *dalan (curve, arch); and tun (enclosure, settlement).

Origin: Proto-Germanic, Old English

 

Ingram

Ingram is an English surname derived from Norman French Enguerrand which is the Medieval French form of Engilram, a Germanic name. The second part of the name comes from Germanic hramn (raven) though the first part of the name is a little trickier. It could be from Angil, the name of a Germanic tribe possibly meaning “angel”, though it could also be derived from Proto-Germanic *anguz possibly meaning “narrow, tight”.

Another possible origin for the first element is that it comes from Ing, a Germanic name possibly meaning “ancestor” from Proto-Germanic *Ingwaz; Ing is an Old Norse cognate of Yngvi, the name of an Old Norse fertility god, possibly an alternate name for Freyr, the Norse god of fertility, prosperity, sunshine, and rain.

Origin: Ancient Germanic

 

Linden

Linden comes from a surname as well as a place name meaning “linden tree” or “lime tree” from Germanic element lind, which comes from Proto-Germanic *lindo meaning “soft, tender, flexible”. It was used to refer to someone who lived near a lime/linden tree.

Spelled Lindon, or Lyndon, it comes from an Old English surname derived from a place name meaning “flax hill” from Old English lin (flax) and dun (hill).

Origin: Proto-Germanic

Variants:

  • Lindon
  • Lyndon

 

 

Brandon

Brandon is from an English surname derived from a place name meaning “hill covered with broom” from Old English brom (broom, gorse) and dun (hill), likely referring to someone who lived near a place covered with gorse or broom shrubs.

However, Brandon could also be derived from Old French brandon from Frankish *brand meaning “firebrand, torch, sword” which ultimately comes from Proto-Germanic *brandaz, a cognate of Old Norse brandr.

It could also be a various form of Brendan, an Irish name derived from Welsh brenin meaning “prince” from Celtic brigantinos meaning “king, prince”, “lord” or “high one”.

Origin: Old English, Proto-Germanic, Old Norse, Celtic

Variants:

  • Branden (English)
  • Brendan (Irish, English)