Baylor

Baylor comes from an English surname with several possible meanings: either a variant spelling of Bailor, which comes from a legal term meaning "one who delivers goods", referring to someone who transferred property to another person (bailee) for safekeeping, from Old French bailler (to deliver, hand over) ultimately derived from Latin bāiulus (one who bears a burden; porter, carrier); it could … Continue reading Baylor

Advertisements

Octavia

Octavia is the feminine form of Octavius, an Ancient Roman family name meaning "eighth" from Latin octavus. Origin: Latin Variants: Ottavia (Italian) Octávia (Portuguese) Otávia (Brazilian Portuguese) Octavie (French)   Male forms: Octavio (Spanish) Octavius (Ancient Roman) Ottavio (Italian) Octávio (Portuguese) Otávio (Brazilian Portuguese) Octave (French)  

Devon

Devon is the name of a county in England which derives its name from a Celtic tribe who inhabited the area known as the Dumnonii which is made up from Proto-Celtic *dubno- meaning "deep" or "world" and *nanto meaning "stream" or "valley" so the name would mean "deep valley" or "deep stream". It may also be a variant spelling … Continue reading Devon

Hannibal

Hannibal is the name of a famous Carthaginian general who is considered one of the greatest military generals in history and caused the Ancient Romans great fear. His name comes from Phoenician haan (grace) combined with the name Ba'al meaning "grace of Ba'al", Ba'al being the name of the chief god of the Phoenician pantheon which means "lord, husband". Hannibal … Continue reading Hannibal

Massima

Massima is the feminine form of Massimo, the Italian form of Maximus, which comes from an Ancient Roman family name meaning "greatest". Massima is also an Italian word meaning "maxim, rule, maximum". Origin: Latin Variants: Maxima (Ancient Roman) Maximiliana (Ancient Roman) Máxima (Spanish) Maximiliane (German) Maximilienne (French) Maxine (English) Maxene (English)   Male forms: Massimo (Italian) Maximos … Continue reading Massima

Purvis

Purvis comes from an English surname, originally used as a metonymic occupational surname for an appointed official responsible for providing supplies for a monastary or manor house. The name comes from Middle English purveys meaning "provisions, supplies" from Old French porveoir (to look at, procure) which is ultimately derived from Latin providere (to foresee, anticipate). Origin: Latin Variants: Purves Purvess  

Viatrix

Viatrix is the feminine form of Late Latin Viator which means "voyager, traveler" in Latin, so Viatrix means "female traveler/voyager". The name was later changed to Beatrix to make it resemble Latin beatus (blessed). Nicknames: Via, Trix, Trixie Origin: Late Latin Variants: Beatrix (Late Roman, English, Dutch, Hungarian, German) Beatrice (English, Italian, Swedish)   Male forms: Viator (Late Roman)  

Letitia

Letitia is a variant form of Laetitia which comes from Latin laetus meaning "joy, happiness, glad". In Roman mythology, Laetitia is the goddess of happiness and gaiety. Nicknames: Letty/Lettie, Tisha Origin: Latin Variants: Laetitia (Ancient Roman, English, French) Lettice (English) Letizia (Italian) Leticia (Spanish) Letícia (Portuguese, Hungarian) Latisha (African-American, English) Lateesha  

Bailey

Bailey is a unisex given name which comes from an English surname with several possible meanings: it's an occupational surname meaning "bailiff", referring to someone who was an officer of the court, similar to a sheriff or a sheriff's deputy in charge with keeping order; it derives from Latin bāiulus (carrier, porter; manager, steward); it also … Continue reading Bailey