Horatio

Horatio is the English form of Horatius, an Ancient Roman family name that could possibly be derived from Latin hora meaning "hour, time, season", although it's more likely that the name is Etruscan in origin and its real meaning lost. Horatio is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's play Hamlet, as well as also being a … Continue reading Horatio

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Maraya

Maraya is a variant spelling of Mariah, itself a variant form of Maria which comes from the Hebrew female name Miriam, a name of unknown meaning though possible meanings ascribed to it are “sea of bitterness”, “rebelliousness” or “obstinacy”, and “wished for child”. It’s also possible that it might be derived from an Egyptian source either meaning “beloved” from myr, … Continue reading Maraya

Quentin

Quentin is the French form of Quintinus, an Ancient Roman cognomen meaning "fifth" from Latin quintus (fifth), which may have originally been given to a fifth child or a child born in the fifth month of the year. Quentin is also a surname derived from the given name. Quinton is a variant spelling though it's also an English place name … Continue reading Quentin

Annalora

Annalora is an English female name, a combination of Anna, the Latinate form of Hannah which comes from the Hebrew name Channah meaning “grace” or “favor”, and Lora, another spelling of Laura which means "laurel" derived from Latin laurus; laurels were a symbol of victory in Ancient Greece, their leaves used to make a crown for the victors. Origin: Hebrew, Latin Variants: Anna Lora Anna-Lora … Continue reading Annalora

Clemency

Clemency is the feminine form of Clement meaning "merciful, gentle", deriving from Latin clemens (merciful, lenient, mild, gentle). Origin: Latin Variants: Clemence (English) Clémence (French) Clémentine (French) Clementine (English) Clementina (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Late Roman) Clementia (Late Roman) Klementina (Slovene, Croatian) Klementyna (Polish) Klimentina (Macedonian) Clementa (Romanian, Spanish, Dutch, English)   Male forms: Clement (English) Klement (Czech, Slovak) … Continue reading Clemency

Karina

Karina is either a variant spelling of Carina, a Late Latin name derived from carus meaning "dear, beloved" though it may also be from Latin carina meaning "keel", referring to the keel of a ship and is also the name of a constellation. In Greek myth, Carina is the name of the keel of the ship Argo Navis, which is also the name of … Continue reading Karina

Mario

Mario is the Italian and Spanish form of Marius, an Ancient Roman family name which could be derived from Latin mas meaning "male" or Latin mare meaning "sea". It could also be derived from Mars, the Roman god of war (the Roman counterpart of the Greek god Ares), a name of uncertain etymology though it's possible that Mars was … Continue reading Mario

Beatrix

Beatrix is a variant form of Viatrix, the feminine form of Viator meaning "voyager, traveler, wayfarer". The name was later changed to resemble Latin beatus meaning "happy, blessed". Nicknames: Bea/Bee, Trix, Trixie Origin: Latin Variants: Beatrice (Italian, English, Swedish) Béatrice (French) Beatrise (Latvian) Beatriu (Catalan) Beatrycze (Polish) Beatriz (Spanish, Portuguese) Beitris (Scottish) Betrys (Welsh) Viatrix (Latin)   Male forms: Viator (Latin) … Continue reading Beatrix

Talia

Talia has several meanings depending on the origin: it's a variant transcription of Talya, a Hebrew female name meaning "dew from God"; Talia is also an Aboriginal word meaning "near water" and is the name of a town in Australia; it's also an Aramaic unisex name, a variant of Talya meaning "young lamb", derived from taleh; it's also … Continue reading Talia

Dixie

Dixie was once used as a generic name for the southern U.S. states from the Mason-Dixon line which defined the border between Pennsylvania and Maryland, and which later defined the boundary between free states and slave states. The name may have originated as a nickname for Dixon, an English patrynomic surname meaning "son of Dick", the … Continue reading Dixie