Hannibal

Hannibal is the name of a famous Carthaginian general who is considered one of the greatest military generals in history and caused the Ancient Romans great fear. His name comes from Phoenician haan (grace) combined with the name Ba’al meaning “grace of Ba’al”, Ba’al being the name of the chief god of the Phoenician pantheon which means “lord, husband”. Hannibal is also a surname, either derived from the given name or else a variant spelling of Hunnibal or Hunnabell, an Old English surname perhaps derived from Germanic given name Hunnbald meaning “brave bear cub” from Germanic elements hunn (bear cub) and bald (bold, brave). It may also be a derivative of female given name Anabel derived from Late Latin Amabilis meaning “lovable”.

Origin: Phoenician, Germanic, Late Latin

Variants:

  • Annibale (Italian)
  • Aníbal (Spanish, Portuguese)

 

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Tyrus

Tyrus has several possible meanings and origins such as

  • being the Latin name of Greek Tyros, the name of an ancient Phoenician port city now known as Tyre, Lebanon (or Sur/Sour in Arabic). It was supposedly the birth place of Europa, who was the mother of King Minos of Crete who was abducted by the Greek god Zeus in the form of a white bull; the continent of Europe was named after her; and Dido, the ill-fated lover of Aeneas and the founder of Carthage (in what is now modern day Tunisia). The name means “rock” after the rocky formation of the island from Phoenician ṣūr (rock);
  • Tyrus could also be a combination of given names Tyrone, which comes from Irish meaning “land of Eoghan”, and Cyrus which comes from Kyros, the Greek form of Persian Kurush of unknown meaning though possibly meaning “far-sighted”, “young”, “sun”, “hero”, “one who bestows care”, and “humiliator of the enemy in verbal contest”. The name has also possibly been associated with Greek kyrios meaning “lord”;
  • as a surname, Tyrus could be a variant of Tyer, which comes from a Germanic personal name Theudhard meaning “hardy people” or “brave race/strong race” from Germanic elements theod (people, race) and hard (hardy, brave, strong); it may also be related to Tye, a Middle English topographic name meaning “common pasture”, referring to someone who lived near one;
  • Tyer may also be a shortened form of McIntyre, a Scottish surname meaning “son of the craftsman”.

Origin: Phoenician, Irish, Persian, Greek, Ancient Germanic, Middle English, Scottish

Variants:

  • Tyros (Greek)
  • Tyre

 

Dido

Dido (pr. die-do) is the name of the Carthaginian queen featured in Virgil’s Aeneid. She was the founder and very first queen of Carthage (located in modern day Tunisia), who killed herself by throwing herself onto a funeral pyre after the Roman hero Aeneas left her to find a new home for the Trojan people. Though Dido’s real name was Elissa, she was also known as Dido later on, a name which seems to have been given to her by the Libyans meaning “wanderer” since she and her people had been wandering, searching for a new home before arriving at North Africa where she founded Carthage. Other possibly meanings for the name I’ve seen are it could possibly be from Phoenician meaning “virgin”, or related to Akkadian didu used to refer to a woman’s robe (dida) meaning “loosened” or “torn”.

Origin: Libyan, Phoenician, Akkadian

Variants:

  • Didone (Italian)
  • Didon (French)

 

Sidonie

Sidonie is the French form of Sidonia, the feminine form of Sidonius, a Latin name meaning “of Sidon”, referring to someone from the ancient Phoenician city of Sidon (in what is now modern day Saïda, Lebanon). Sidon itself most likely comes from Phoenician Tzidhon meaning “fishing place” or “fishery” from tzud (to hunt, capture).

Origin: Phoenician

Variants:

  • Sidony (English)
  • Sidonia (German, Late Roman)

 

Male forms:

  • Sidonius (Late Roman)