Belisarius

Belisarius is the name of a renowned and famous general of the Byzantine Empire under the rule of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I and was called the Last of the Romans because he was believed to embody the values of the Ancient Roman civilization. The meaning behind the name is unknown. Belisarius was born in Illyria, the western part of the Balkan peninsula, so his name might be Illyric in origin. Another theory I’ve seen posted is that it might be derived from Slavonic Beli-tzar meaning “white prince” although that origin seems to be seriously in doubt. It’s also possible that his name is related to Belisama, a Celtic goddess whose name is uncertain though the first part of the name, bel-, which means either “bright” or “strong” or “powerful” while the second part of the name, -isama-, means “most” or “greatest” so the name essentially means “brightest” or “most powerful”. The second part of the name might also be related to Proto-Celtic *samos (summer) so the name may also mean “summer bright” which may make sense she is the goddess of fire and light as well as possibly being a goddess of the Ribble river in Merseyside, England.

Belisarius is also the name of a genus of scorpion.

Nicknames: Bel

Origin: Slavic, Proto-Celtic

Variants:

  • Belisario (Spanish, Italian)
  • Bellisario (Italian)
  • Bellisarius (English)
  • Bélisaire (French)

 

Female forms:

  • Belisaria (English)
  • Bellisaria (English)

 

Sabrina

Sabrina is the Latin form of Old Welsh Habren or Hafren, the original name of the River Severen in the United Kingdom. The name might be derived from Proto-Celtic *samaros meaning “summer fallow, fallow land” from Proto-Celtic *samos (summer) and *aros (ploughing, ploughed land), or from *samos (summer) and *renwo- (quick, fast) or it could possibly mean “boundary” from an unknown source. Sabrina could also be an Arabic name derived from Arabicصبر (sabr) meaning “patient”. 

According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, the river received its name from the daughter of Locrinus, a king of the Britons, and his mistress Estrildis, a captured Germanic princess who was originally brought to Britain as a captive by the Huns. Locrinus fell in love with her but he was already bethrothed to Gwendolen, the daughter of Corineus and an ally of his father’s, and though he went through with the marriage and had a son by her, Locrinus kept Estrildis a secret by locking her in a cave underground and visiting her there. He had his daughter by her. When Corineus died, Locrinus left Gwendolen and took Estrildis as his queen. In response, Gwendolen assembled an army during which he was killed in battle, and Gwendolen had Estrildis and Sabrina/Habren drowned in the river which now bears her name.

Origin: Proto-Celtic, Arabic

Variants:

  • Sabryna (English)
  • Zabrina (English)
  • Habren (Welsh)
  • Hafren (Welsh)
  • Severn (English)
  • Sabre
  • Sabren
  • Averne

 

Finn

Finn comes from an Irish name meaning “fair”, “blessed” or “white” derived from Proto-Celtic *windos (white). Finn is the older spelling of Fionn, which belongs to the name of a warrior in Irish myth known as Fionn mac Cumhaill (or Finn MacCool in English) and the leader of the Fianna. His birth name was Deimne but he was later nicknamed Fionn when his hair turned prematurely white.

Finn also comes from Old Norse Finnr meaning “a Finn, a Sami, Lapp”, a given name and byname used to refer to someone who came from Finland or was part of the Sami people (also known as Lapps). Although the origin behind  finnr is uncertain it has been linked to Old Norse meaning “wanderer”. Finnr is the name of a dawrf mentioned in the Völuspá, the first poem in the Poetic Edda, a collection of Old Norse poems. Finn is also a surname which could be be derived from both sources, as well as being a short form of names like Finley, Finnegan, or Thorfinn/Torfinn

Origin: Proto-Celtic, Old Norse

Varinats:

  • Fionn (Irish)
  • Fion (Irish)
  • Finnagán (Irish diminutive of Fionn)
  • Fionnán (Irish diminutive of Fionn)
  • Finnán (older form of Fionnán)
  • Finnr (Ancient Scandinavian)
  • Finnur (Icelandic)
  • Fína (Greenlandic)
  • Finna (Greenlandic)

 

Female forms:

  • Fiona (Scottish, English)
  • Finna (female form of Finnr; Old Norse, Icelandic, Danish, Norwegian)