Brett

Brett comes from an English surname meaning "Breton", originally used to refer to someone who came from Brittany though it may also have been given to the Celtic inhabitants of Strathclyde, Scotland, who were called Bryttas/Brettas up until the 14th century. Brett is also a German word meaning "plank, board, shelf, tray" which comes from Proto-Germanic *burdą (board, … Continue reading Brett

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Braith

Braith is a male name of uncertain meaning though it may be derived from Welsh brith, braith meaning "speckled, mottled, brindled" derived from Proto-Brythonic *briθ (painted, speckled, variegated) which comes from Proto-Celtic *mrixtos (speckled). Braith is also a surname likely derived from the given name though it may be related to Old Norse breiðr meaning "broad". Origin: Proto-Celtic Variants: Brayth (English)  

Carlyle

Carlyle is a variant spelling of Carlisle, a surname derived from the name of a city in Cumbria, England. The place was originally called Luguvalium, originally a Roman settlement named by the Ancient Romans meaning "strength of Luguvalos", made up of Lugus, a Celtic god associated with the Roman god Mercury; the origin of his name is unknown though it's … Continue reading Carlyle

Maeve

Maeve is the anglicized form of Gaelic Medb, the name of a warrior queen in Irish mythology. The name may be derived from Proto-Celtic *medu- (mead) and *medua- (intoxicating) so the name either means "mead woman" or "she who intoxicates". Origin: Proto-Celtic Variants: Maeva (English) Medb (Old Irish) Méabh (Irish) Meadhbh (Irish) Meave (Irish) Mave (Irish)  

Teague

Teague is an anglicized form of Tadhg, an Irish male  meaning "poet" derived from Proto-Celtic *tazgos (poet, storyteller). Teague is also a surname derived from the given name, while Teagan is a diminutive of Tadhg meaning "little Teague". Origin: Proto-Celtic Variants: Tadhg (Irish, Scottish) Tadg (Irish, Scottish) Teige (Irish) Teigue (Irish) Tadhgán (Irish) Teagan (English) Tighe (Irish)  

Rhian

Rhian (pr. ree-an) is a Welsh female name meaning "maiden" from Welsh rhiain which derives from Proto-Celtic *rīganī- (queen). It could also be used as a short form of Rhiannon meaning "great queen" from Celtic Rigantona. In Welsh mythology, Rhiannon is a major figure in the Mabinogion and has been associated with the Gaulish goddess of horses, Epona. Rhian is also a Welsh male name, … Continue reading Rhian

Devon

Devon is the name of a county in England which derives its name from a Celtic tribe who inhabited the area known as the Dumnonii which is made up from Proto-Celtic *dubno- meaning "deep" or "world" and *nanto meaning "stream" or "valley" so the name would mean "deep valley" or "deep stream". It may also be a variant spelling … Continue reading Devon

Fiona

Fiona seems to have first been coined by Scottish poet James Macpherson who based it on the Fianna, the name of a group of warriors in Irish mythology, or as the feminine form of Fionn. The name comes from Old Irish finn meaning "fair, blond, white" from Proto-Celtic *windos- (white). Origin: Proto-Celtic Variants: Fionna (English, Scottish)   Male forms: Fionn … Continue reading Fiona

Alan

Alan is a male name of uncertain etymology which may possibly mean "little rock" or "noble" from Old Irish ail. It also means "beautiful, handsome" from Scottish Gaelic àlainn (beautiful, fine, splendid). Alan may also be derived from the name of a Celtic god, Alaunus, which may be derived from Proto-Celtic *aleti meaning "to nourish, grow" from Proto-Indo-European root word *h₂el- (to grow, … Continue reading Alan

Keith

Keith comes from a Scottish surname of uncertain meaning though it may be derived from Proto-Brythonic word *koɨd meaning "wood, forest", ultimately from a Proto-Celtic origin. The name may have come from an ancient Germanic tribe known as the Catti who came to Scotland in the 11th century to help the native population defend themselves against the … Continue reading Keith