Tawna

Tawna is an English female name, a variant of Tawny, the name of a color, referring to something that is light-brown or brownish-orange. It comes from Old French tané (tan-colored) which ultimately derives from Proto-Celtic *tannos (green oak). Origin: Proto-Celtic Meaning: refers to a light-brown to brownish-orange color Usage: English Variants: Tawny (English)  

Kaylee

Kaylee is an English female given name, a combination of Kay (a unisex name with various possible meanings depending on where it comes from) and Lee, which comes from an English surname meaning "meadow, clearing". Kaylee is also a surname, likely a variant spelling of Cayley which seems to have originated from a place in France called Cailly which …

Bretton

Bretton comes from an English surname meaning "Breton", originally used to refer to someone who came from Brittany, the English form of Latin Britannia which comes from the name of a British-Celtic tribe *Pretanni via Proto-Celtic *mrixtos meaning “speckled, mottled, brindled”, which the Ancient Romans used to refer to the Picts. It’s the name of a region in France. Origin: Proto-Celtic Variants: Breton (English) …

Olwen

Olwen is a Welsh female name meaning "white footprint", made up of Welsh elements ol (footprint) and gwen (white, fair, blessed). This was the name of a figure in Welsh mythology who apparently received her name because white trefoils would grow where she walked. However, it's also possible that Olwen comes from Welsh olwyn meaning "wheel" and that …

Culhwch

Culhwch (pr. keel-hookh; Forvo) is a Welsh male name meaning "narrow pig", made up of Welsh elements cul (narrow) and hwch (sow), though I've also seen it listed as meaning "hiding place of the pig". In Welsh mythology, Culhwch's mother Goleuddydd becomes mad when she gets pregnant and wanders the countryside; when her time came to give birth she regained her …

Fenella

Fenella is a female given name, the Scottish form of Fionnuala, made up from Irish elements finn (fair, white) and guala (shoulder) meaning “fair shoulder” or “fair-shouldered”. In Irish mythology, Fionnuala is the name of a figure in Irish mythology, the daughter of King Lir and the sister of Aodh, Fiachra, and Conn. She and her brothers were changed into swans by their stepmother Aoife, …

Vortigern

Vortigern is the name of a British warlord in 5th century Britain, though he's an obscure figure and there's not much known about him. He did invite the Saxons (Hengist and Horsa) to Britain in order to fight against the Picts and the Scots, eventually leading to the Anglo-Saxon invasion of Britain; there have been various portrayals …

Finnian

Finnian is an Irish male name which comes from Irish element finn meaning "white, fair, blessed" via Proto-Celtic *windos (white). Finnian is also a surname originating from the given name. Nicknames: Finn Origin: Proto-Celtic Variants: Finnén (Irish) Fionn (Irish) Finn (Irish) Gwenneg (Breton) Winoc (Breton, French) Gwyn (Welsh) Gwynn (Welsh) Wyn (Welsh) Wynn (Welsh) Wynne (Welsh)   …

Devontae

Devontae is a modern English name (of primarily African-American use), an elaborated form of Devon, the name of a county in England which derives its name from a Celtic tribe who inhabited the area, known as the Dumnonii, made up from Proto-Celtic *dubno- meaning “deep” or “world” and *nanto meaning “stream” or “valley” so the name would mean “deep valley” or “deep …

Breccan

Breccan is an anglicized form of Breccán, an Irish male name meaning "speckled, freckled", made up of Old Irish brecc (speckled, freckled) via Proto-Celtic *brikkos combined with diminutive suffix -an.   Origin: Proto-Celtic Variants: Breccán (Irish) Brychan (Welsh)    

Fiachra

Fiachra (pr. fee-akh-ra; Forvo) is the name of one of the children of Lir who, along with his brothers Aodh and Conn and sister Fionnuala, were turned into swans by their stepmother Aoife, a curse that lasted for 900 years before being broken. The name comes from Irish fiach meaning "raven" which derives from a Proto-Celtic root word. Origin: Proto-Celtic Variants: Fiacre (French) …

Lir

Lir is the Irish cognate of Llyr, the name of the Welsh god of the sea in Welsh mythology. The name means "sea" or "ocean". In Irish mythology, Lir is the Irish god of the sea and the father of Manannan mac Lir, also a sea deity. There's also an Irish legend called The Children of Lir, in …